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Burnt plastic at nursery

(18 Posts)
kdoc Wed 12-Nov-14 20:01:03

Hi, wondering if anyone has any experience of this. A box of mixed plastic plates etc was left on a stove top at DS's nursery. Got burnt. Nasty plastic smell but since all toys/surfaces have been cleaned. How do you know when/if safe to let little ones back in? Been a couple of days but kitchen area still smells of burnt plastic.
Other parents have a wide range of views ie totally fine right up to we need to get independent chemical expert to test for toxins. Any advice / opinion welcomed.

Madlizzy Wed 12-Nov-14 20:02:54

I'd not be bothered. The smell will cling to fabrics etc for a bit and then go.

Lagoonablue Wed 12-Nov-14 20:04:38

No you don't need an expert in toxins for an independent survey.

kdoc Fri 14-Nov-14 20:05:54

Thanks for the feedback. Another parent rang the fire brigade for their opinion on this and they said it was not a problem once toys etc had been cleaned.

ChippingInAutumnLover Fri 14-Nov-14 20:09:33

Oh for the love of small fish. Some parents really do need a reality check. You air it out as best you can and get on with life for goodness sake. How on earth do you not just do >> hmm that face at them?!

bloodyteenagers Fri 14-Nov-14 20:16:53

Why isnt the manager of the nursery making various calls to fire brigade, environmental advice etc for advice rather than letting parents do it and relying on second hand info?

HedgehogsDontBite Sat 15-Nov-14 10:34:31

I'll ask DH when he gets in. He's a scientist and plastics is his area.

hollie84 Sat 15-Nov-14 10:43:05

I wouldn't worry for a moment tbh.

Coconutty Sat 15-Nov-14 10:45:20

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

chemenger Sat 15-Nov-14 10:58:01

Given that these same parents probably burn scented candles and don't give a second thought to the resulting chemical cocktail I think they should chill. Open the windows for a while. Some burning plastics would give off hazardous fumes but these would disperse quickly in a well ventilated room after the fire. The actual smoke might have contained hazardous chemicals (depending on the type of plastic) but I would think that the residual smell would not. Disclaimer; although I know something about hazardous chemicals I am not an expert on the products of combustion of plastics, this is not expert opinion. Ps the candles are probably harmless too.

chemenger Sat 15-Nov-14 11:02:55

Although, when I think about it, maybe I am an independent chemical expert, I am available at a very reasonable day rate, and I can even bring some test tubes for hazardous chemicals. I can also come in a full chemical protection suit, for a suitable fee, just to add gravitas.

HedgehogsDontBite Sat 15-Nov-14 11:36:39

DH agrees with the fire brigade advice. He says that anything toxic, which depends on the type of plastic, would be in the soot. The smell is just an annoyance which will disperse with ventilation.

lucidlady Sat 15-Nov-14 12:08:02

OP, is it you who's concerned about the toxins and wanting the independent advice? I think it's natural to be concerned but I'd trust the fire brigade's response.

ScrambledEggAndToast Sun 16-Nov-14 13:03:07

What would they do if they were at home fgs?? Move out??!!

IgnoreMeEveryOtherReindeerDoes Sun 16-Nov-14 13:16:16

I had a kitchen fire and the plastic melted on the oven. Fire brigade used a big fan blower to clear the smoke, left all windows open. Was fine to go back in house straight after had to wiped the walls and cupboards down because of smell never occurred to me about toxins. confused

AgentProvocateur Sun 16-Nov-14 13:19:46

Ha ha ha!

LynetteScavo Sun 16-Nov-14 13:26:53

Independant chemical expert? Seriously?

Where would one find such a person to offer this service? The yellow pages? confused

socially Sun 16-Nov-14 13:28:59

It would literally not occur to me that this would be a problem.

It must be exhausting to go through life with all these worries!

How terrifying it must have been though hmm

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