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A strange thing about reading classic books on Kindle

(13 Posts)
Catzpyjamas Tue 01-Dec-15 23:40:49

I just downloaded a book by Louisa May Alcott and the first page reads:
"Thank you for reading. In the event that you appreciate this book, please consider sharing the good word(s) by leaving a review, or connect with the author."

So, can anyone advise me how to start a seance? wink

TheHouseOnTheLane Wed 02-Dec-15 06:06:19

Dear Ms Alcott,

Your latest book displeased me greatly due to the lack of paper pages! What is this strange light box in the guise of a book?

I have attempted to find the leaves within the bindings to no avail. I did pass the "book" onto my local scrivener who kindly threw it in the fire having examined it and come to the conclusion that it is the work of the Devil himself.

Please refrain from writing such outlandish "books" in future.

Yours disconsolately,

Partridge Crimpy

sassytheFIRST Wed 02-Dec-15 06:25:27

When you do make contact at the Victorian Writers' Seance, could you put my qu to her please? Oh, and if Emily Bronte is there can you let me know - I've a few for her too.

Louisa May, I know you had a dad complex but why oh WHY did you make Jo marry that drippy Prof Bauer and hand the delectable, rich Laurie to whiny Amy on a plate?

TheHouseOnTheLane Wed 02-Dec-15 07:18:58

Oh no! The Prof was a hero! He "saved" Jo's faith in the face of all those scholarly forward thinking types who had her questioning the existence of God!

He spoke up even though he was shy and he debated with them until all was well in Jo's mind again.

Laurie couldn't have done that.

Jo was an intelligent woman who needed more than the eye-candy and millions that Laurie could offer.

Catzpyjamas Wed 02-Dec-15 08:00:11

Jo was too strong for the lovely Laurie and would have been bored with him within a year. They'd be making each other miserable and we'd be saying LTB.

A Victorian writers' seance would be fascinating if it worked, wouldn't it?

Are you there, Mr Dickens? Can you tell us who you based Ebenezer Scrooge on?

KurriKurri Wed 02-Dec-15 13:13:32

Dear Ms Alcott (may I call you Lou?)

Seriously - before the next edition, you can't let <spoiler alert> Beth die. Many readers will never get over this.

But you were right about Laurie and Jo - she was out of his league. He deserved better than Amy though !

Jo would have hated living with Laurie and he'd have tried harder and harder and made her crosser and crosser. I think the Prof is perfect for her - but once Laurie marries Amy he's doomed to boring smuggery. I think Meg should have married him, post John, and Amy doomed to spinsterhood.

HarrietVane99 Fri 04-Dec-15 11:56:34

Laurie was too young for Meg. He was still behaving like a spoilt brat when she was a parent.

Beth should have lived and married Laurie. Amy could have gone out and earned her own living. It would have been good for her.

When I was doing A levels some of us tried a seance (not very seriously) to try to raise Shakespeare to tell us whether Hamlet was really mad.

But she'd have been ready for a new 'toy' after losing John, and helping the children financially would have given him a purpose that he was lacking.

I'd like to talk to Jane Austen - Hi Jane. Which of your male characters would you most like to go to bed with and why? And btw - Fanny Price - just WHY???

HarrietVane99 Fri 04-Dec-15 17:09:58

Fanny Price - just WHY???

Quite. Mansfield Park was also on our A Level syllabus. We all thought Fanny was a drip and Edmund a prig.

I think Jane would have chosen Capt. Wentworth. He's not as rich as Darcy (although he's not poor), but he's got a whole lot more life experience.

LifeHuh Fri 04-Dec-15 18:48:49

Am I the only person who thinks Amy and Laurie are very well suited? Yes? Ok then! 😃

Yes - I also think Jane would have chosen Wentworth, but I bet she'd have had great fun having a season or two of dancing with Henry Crawford.

SaltyGoodness Sat 05-Dec-15 09:14:11

once Laurie marries Amy he's doomed to boring smuggery

No no no their secondary infertility & poor health of their only child softens them and rteaches valuable lesson (of course) that money can't buy happiness etc

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