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If, in theory, I was to admit that BLW might NOT be a load of old bollocks...

(20 Posts)
tethersend Fri 02-Nov-12 11:20:01

...What advice would you give me?

DD2 is coming up for six months and has CMP allergy (although this may be a misdiagnosis). The GP advised starting her on baby rice to address her constant hunger- however, this just made her constipated. She has what I now suspect to be an undiagnosed Tongue tie.

Due to all this, I just might be prepared to consider the slim chance that BLW might not be the hyped-up choking bonanza I had it down as... So I have two questions:

1. What do you actually do?

2. Why isn't it a load of old bollocks?

Any attempts to rid me of my unhealthy cynicism gratefully received.

ManifestingMingeHooHoosAgain Fri 02-Nov-12 11:26:03

You sit them up straight. They have to move the food upwards to the back of the mouth to swallow it. That's why they hardly ever choke, a slumped baby having puree spooned in can have the food run to the back of the mouth and choke on it.

I read the BLW book and it made loads of sense to me, esp as it explains about why choking is really unlikely. And I have nursed lots of stroke patients, it's quite similar to why they have thickened liquids so they can control it better in the mouth and throat.

Golden rules - don't put food in their mouth.
Sit them upright

a few things are riskier - I didn't give whole slices of raw apple but a pile of grated apple is fine

Using a crinkly chip cutter makes it easier to pick up fingers of slippery fruit.

Best done with a dog to clear up the dropped stuff.

Cut everything into big long chip shapes for a while, they need part to hold and part to chomp on.

I weaned one on puree and one on BLW - BLW was miles better, easier, and ended up with a much more adventurous eater.

forevergreek Fri 02-Nov-12 11:26:40

Just try her on healthy bits that you normally et at home. Avoid salt and hunny but otherwise anything goes really

At this age easy to try food here were avocado, banana, steamed veg, etc etc

Then just chop up/ give parts of you dinner and let them try

ManifestingMingeHooHoosAgain Fri 02-Nov-12 11:28:18

Not putting food in the mouth - when they are able to pick up small round things like peas/raisins with their fingers/pincer grip, they are developmentally ready to eat them.

It's loads easier when you go out for a meal too - I would put some pieces on veg and strips of meat and a chip or two on a side plate to cool down then DS ate them at the table with me. Took extra money for tips if he made a mess though grin

TeaBrick Fri 02-Nov-12 11:33:19

I had a lot of problems and heartache with breastfeeding ds, and felt really down about my lack of ability to get nutrition into him etc, it was a really hard time for me. When I started BLW with him, it was just lovely to see him feeding himself and enjoying the food, and also weirdly reassuring to see him gag, note: GAG, not choke, on food sometimes, and to realise that his gag reflex did the job it was meant to, and pushed the food out of his mouth so he couldn't choke on it. It was also a lot easier than pureeing I imagine, but I'm not very domestic. It also forced me to cut down on the amount of salt in my cooking. They can eat anything you eat as long as no salt added.
And it's just really entertaining to see your baby experiment with food!

ManifestingMingeHooHoosAgain Fri 02-Nov-12 11:38:47

It made me eat more veg and healthy stuff too - you don't eat pizza every night if you are sharing it with your baby. Although he does love pizza grin

Same banned stuff as for purees though really - choking hazards like nuts, no honey, avoid salty stuff.

Toast is better than bread because it dissolves more but bread goes claggy. And as PP said, occasional gagging is normal and totally different to choking.

Come on, you know you want to come over to the dark side. Tis a piece of piss, really.

notcitrus Fri 02-Nov-12 11:50:11

You can do finger foods as well as spoon feeding you know!
Which makes it even easier to have them eat what you eat. I suppose I could just let dd feed herself porridge and yoghurt but I'm still finding gunk on the walls from when I did...

CMOTDibbler Fri 02-Nov-12 11:51:58

What do you do ? You cook healthy food for the whole family, and chuck some on your babies high chair tray, or sit them on your lap and let them snaffle food from your plate. And relax about what they do or don't eat - they'll get the hang of it soon enough

AitchTwoOhOneTwo Fri 02-Nov-12 11:54:40

HAH! grin

good luck, tethers, hope you both enjoy it. and if you don't, deffo do something else.

BlueyDragon Fri 02-Nov-12 12:03:56

Don't pin your hopes on BLW meaning that your child will eat anything. DD (purée and finger food weaned) loves veg but won't eat mushrooms, tomatoes or eggs. DS (2.5) (BLW), having eaten anything that was put in front of him, has got fussy about green veg. But he will eat eggs and tomatoes. TBH, whatever you do they hit an unadventurous patch I reckon.

BLW was much easier because I wasn't fussing about introducing foods carefully, he just ate what we ate (I cook without salt mostly anyway and we try and cook from scratch) in a form he could get hold of it. It is more messy and some people think you are bonkers my granny. And he is a bit of a cutlery refusenik, unless cutlery is the only way he can get the food in. If I was having another DC I would go the BLW route.

nickeldaisical Fri 02-Nov-12 12:06:38

yesh, you just put them in a chair (or in our case, sit them on a large towel in the middle of the room (DD scratches when she's strapped in))
put chunks of food in front of them.
wait.

in theory, for the first couple of months, they'll just play with the food. they'll put it into their mouths and suck, or they'll try to chew it.
sometimes they'll eat it.

sometimes, it's okay to pick up the food and put it in front of them, to see if they'll grab for it - DD tends to then open her mouth to grab for it, rather than use her hand. it's frustrating, but she's lazy! grin

definitely let them snaffle food from your plate - that's good. DD loves to grab my food while I'm eating it. (like she knows it's safe!)

She's only really got the hang of helping herself to food over the last month or so - before then, she'd eat it if I held it to her, but now she'll happily sit and grab it all and shove it in her mouth.

new tastes, she won't help herself to - she'll wait until I put it to her mouth, then if she likes it, she'll grab it off me and eat it herself.

in the morning, I sit her down with a bowl containing a couple of things (usually a home-made savoury muffin and some fruit), and she'll eat it while I'm washing/dressing.

keep giving them their usual milk, as to start with, they won't really know it's food.

(ps - the NHS advocates BLW now)

nickeldaisical Fri 02-Nov-12 12:09:14

"why isn't it a load of bollocks?"

because it just works, that's why! grin
the baby sits there and gets on with it.
they learn to chew and move food around in their mouth, which means they're less likely to choke.
with purees, they just eat mushed stuff, and they don't learn to manipulate it till much later.

nickeldaisical Fri 02-Nov-12 12:11:28

Manifest - disagree about the apple!
I gave DD a whole apple at 7 months, she grabbed hold of it and just devoured it.
(she had 6 teeth by then, though)
she chewed it and sucked it and bit it and ate it.
it was incredible watching her!
(one of those little apples - if it's a big apple, I give her a slice, skin on because it's not so slippy)

ooh, there's another hint - always give them something to grip - skin on, they eat the fruit and leave the skin. it's very clever to watch

nickeldaisical Fri 02-Nov-12 12:14:20

you can still feed nuts, but nut butters or pureed.

(we add them to curries and other sauces by crushing them in a freezer bag with a rolling pin till they are mushed. or throwing them in the blender as soup etc)

and nut butters on toast are good.

Pascha Fri 02-Nov-12 12:18:13

DS has only ever used an apple for target practice hmm.

Quenelle Fri 02-Nov-12 12:20:44

If you have a Sure Start centre nearby that offers them, do an infant first aid course to give you more confidence if you're still worried about choking.

Read Gill Rapley's book.

Get on Aitch's forum.

Get a dog or put a tablecloth under the highchair so that you can give her back dropped food and it's easy to just shake outside/wash the cloth afterwards.

Agree with BlueyDragon about fussiness. That will happen whatever you do I reckon.

I would do it again because it's so easy.

forevergreek Fri 02-Nov-12 13:43:05

I have always put the food in a bowl though not just lobbed on tray! I wouldn't want my food just thrown on the table and it's awkward when out if they don't learn the whole 'bowl must stay on the table and not be thrown'. And give a spoon / baby fork straight away also. Under a year hey have been eating rice and yogurt like pros with a spoon. Now youngest is 17 months. Eats 98% with cutlery I would say, and occasionally just digs in with hands! ( so does elder brother!)

Also means that when your travelling/ in cafe/ at friends there is always something around they can eat .

tethersend Fri 02-Nov-12 15:57:11

Oooh, loads of replies smile

Ok, so the cynicism may be wavering... but there's no fucking way I'm getting a dog grin

Thanks all.

jaggythistle Fri 02-Nov-12 21:28:35

<hovering on thread due to attempted weaning of spoonaphobic DS2>

i was so going to go for mix of spoon and bits just like DS1, apparently spoons are for wimps though.

i remembered someone on here saying toast is better than bread for young babies blw, so i gave him a bit and he wired in...

also no chance of dog here.

nickelrocketgoBooooooom Sat 03-Nov-12 12:07:46

we made a batch of muffins (savoury) that we got from the internet - it's so easy to feed her that for breakfast.
(usually cheese and veg mix)

and give breakfast before you change them into the day clothes wink

we give our scraps to the chickens.
and you could compost them too.

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