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Anyone participating in the EAT study?

(9 Posts)
FrumpyPumpy Wed 10-Aug-11 16:55:48

We've had a leaflet through and am tempted to volunteer for it, but have a nagging concern that it could mean introducing solids from 12 weeks and I've been soooooooo to the letter of the guidelines with DC1, this goes against all that.

What helped you decide?

Cattleprod Wed 10-Aug-11 17:00:53

Is this the one researching allergies by introducing small amounts of solids (yogurt, fish, peanut butter, that stuff you get in hummous etc) at about 3 months? If so, I have one friend doing it, and another one who declined because she didn't want to commit to exclusive breastfeeding for the duration of the study.

FrumpyPumpy Wed 10-Aug-11 18:43:37

Yes that's the one. I'm just so unsure about introducing food that early.what if DC2's gut is immature?

charitygirl Wed 10-Aug-11 18:49:45

Ha! I have been considering it as seem to be a perfect candidate (currently pg, DC1 mulitply allergic, bf exclusively for 6m last time and plan to again). But it is just so far from 'the guidelines' isn't it? As the study points out, the guidelines aren't doing much to prevent the rise of allergies but there are other considerations re: gut maturity etc. My husband has digestive issues and if these are hereditary I certainly don't want to risk passing them on in any way. BUT I'd love DC2 not to have allergies and this sounds like a really interesting study. Don't know what I'll do, but interested in this thread!

RitaMorgan Wed 10-Aug-11 18:49:47

I thought about it, but felt it was a risk - and it wasn't my risk to take, as ds couldn't consent to it and it was being done to him. I'm glad I didn't, because when he was 12-16 weeks old he still seemed like a little baby to me and far too young for anything but milk.

Also it turned out I'm rubbish at expressing, so committing to exclusive breastfeeding would have meant never going anywhere without ds.

Cattleprod Wed 10-Aug-11 18:58:45

Well my friend's DC1 has multiple allergies and intolerances, as does her DP, which I guess is why she was chosen for the study. Her DC2 (the one taking part) is so far showing no signs of allergies, has normal poos and is much more contented than her DC1 ever was. DC2 has eaten all the foods suggested except for the fish, which was too lumpy in texture, and unable to be blended smoother. The only problem she has found is getting the food into DCs mouth, as obviously the tongue thrust reflex is still present. The support from the researchers is apparently pretty good.

FrumpyPumpy Wed 10-Aug-11 22:38:26

Oh, my dc1 has (touch wood) no allergies yet at 2.4, so prob will not want us anyway. Just feels wrong to give food at 12 wks when Ive been so anti in the past. And I positively dislike baby rice, and that's part of the programme.

okiecokie Thu 11-Aug-11 13:54:03

You don't need to have any food allergy or intolerances in the family to participate in the study. The study also does not permit wheat to be introduced earlier than 17 weeks. For any people considering it there is A LOT of support from the people running it including a very thorough assessment and consultation at 3 months before any foods are introduced. The only criteria at this point is baby is exclusively breast fed. If you choose to participate then you are randomly put into 1 of 2 groups - early introduction or standard indroduction (no food before 6 mths as per current Gov guidelines).

We know so little into why food intolerance and allergy is on the increase and what is best in terms of food introduction (ie abstain or introduce foods to prevent allergy) then the only way we can learn more is if research like this is done.

My DD is participating in the study.

charitygirl Thu 11-Aug-11 18:54:00

Very useful guys - I am leaning towards saying yes. It is so frustrating knowing so little about what causes/exacerbates allergies.

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