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Qualified or Unqualified?

(9 Posts)
fatowl Mon 09-Oct-17 00:53:23

Hoping for some guidance here.

I live overseas but I am moving back to the UK (North Wales) in July 2018. I will need a job, poss not for Sept 2018, but hopefully Jan 2019.

My degree in in MFL and I did PGCE in 1992-3. I did my NQT year in London in 1993-4, but left at the end of that academic year as I was pregnant and didn't return to that job.
I returned part time in 1996-7 teaching MFL on a 0.6 timetable in Surrey.
I then left teaching when I was expecting DD2 and retrained as a childminder and did NVQ III in Early Years. I was a registered childminder from 1997-2004.

I then moved abroad and was an expat wife blush until 2014. I then did CELTA and now teach a 0.6 timetable at a very small private school teaching ESL to KS3.
I also have a Trainers Qualification through Girlguiding and I am knowledgeable about Child Protection, risk assessments and strategic planning through my role as a parent governor (at my DDs school - not the one I work at)

If I were to return to teaching, would I be considered Qualified? I don't feel qualified to be honest, not to teach in a state school.
What could I teach? I couldn't teach MFL - have not used my languages for 20 years and they really have gone.
Are there jobs for ESL?
I do fancy a pastoral role but don't think I have the experience.
Oh and I'll be 48- too old? I can speak welsh though.

BlessYourCottonSocks Tue 10-Oct-17 22:32:48

You are certainly a Qualified Teacher. Don't know enough about it (HoD History, Secondary) but how do you fancy Primary School?

PGCE, ESL, Childminder, Early Years NVQ III and Guiding qualification all sounds perfect for that! You are not too old.

BlessYourCottonSocks Tue 10-Oct-17 22:34:07

Also, however much your MFL has gone, I bet you could do Primary School French (or Spanish - whatever your MFL speciality was). I reckon me and my O level French could probably dabble in a bit of Y5 teaching grin

Fffion Tue 10-Oct-17 22:34:11

You have a PGCE - you are qualified.

leccybill Tue 10-Oct-17 23:49:35

Massive shortage of MFL teachers out there. With all of those additional skills, schools will bite your hand off.

elephantoverthehill Tue 10-Oct-17 23:53:43

If you have the magic number - DES, in my day, you are qualified.

BackforGood Tue 10-Oct-17 23:58:13

Agree with others. You are still a qualified teacher.
There used to be 'Return to Teaching' courses.... do they still exist or were they another fad idea that went by the wayside?

In England, for sure every KS2 pupil is supposed to be learning another language, and someone with your skills could probably find a lot of work in Primary schools teaching an MFL (often done as 'cover' or PPA time for the usual class teacher). You think you've lost your languages, but I'm pretty sure your French (for eg) is going to be FAR better than another teacher who never ever studied French's French is going to be. I'm not sure in N Wales if this is compulsory though as so many schools are already dual language ??

My friend who is a secondary MFL teacher LOVES her 3 Primary schools she works in. Plus of course the same lesson plans work across the different classes smile

fatowl Wed 11-Oct-17 11:22:26

Thanks for your responses, Yes I do have the old fashioned magic number!
My Languages were German with French (I only have A-level French and used to do KS3 French and struggled) I get the impression less German is taught these days and Spanish (of which I have none) is much more popular in schools
I really don't feel qualified to teach MFL, I would be a couple of pages ahead of them in the book - it would be a nightmare. I feel more comfortable teaching English - I'm well read, have a literature based degree, but not an English one.

I feel I would at a minimum need a return to teaching course, if such a thing exists anymore.
As an age group I like upper KS2 and KS3.

fatowl Wed 11-Oct-17 11:29:53

In England, for sure every KS2 pupil is supposed to be learning another language, and someone with your skills could probably find a lot of work in Primary schools teaching an MFL (often done as 'cover' or PPA time for the usual class teacher). You think you've lost your languages, but I'm pretty sure your French (for eg) is going to be FAR better than another teacher who never ever studied French's French is going to be. I'm not sure in N Wales if this is compulsory though as so many schools are already dual language ??

I'm pretty sure in North West Wales, which is where I am going, there is no MFL at Primary as everything is Welsh first language with English taught almost as an MFL. It is the Welshest part of Wales and all teachers are required to be able to teach in Welsh. I could just about do this (I think)

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