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Moving to a 'no school hols off' job within education?

(8 Posts)
Rufus27 Fri 12-May-17 21:23:06

Have been a teacher for 20-odd years. Currently 0.6FT. Have just seen a post advertised within the LA which really interests me (quite unusual and related to something I'm particularly experienced/interested in). It's teaching related, but the hours are 0.6FT without school hols off. It involves countywide travel to schools and office work.

Has anyone made a similar move? Are you glad you did? Was it hard to adjust?

The pay is identical to my current salary, but without school hols off, it would mean having to pay a lot more for childcare (DC is in a term time only nursery) which worries me. (It also involves a lot of travel with my own car which again could affect me financially).

DP's response was, 'well you usually work half your holidays anyway' but even doing school prep at home in the hols is not the same as having to actually 'turn up', if that makes sense?

I have no doubts about the post itself. It's just the lack of hols, especially with a young DC) and just the unknown of working 'normal' hours. There's also getting my head around working more hours for what will effectively be less pay. I need to balance that against the reward of doing something new and different.

Any advice?

NuffSaidSam Fri 12-May-17 21:31:34

If you don't have the school holidays off then presumably you can choose your holidays for the first time?

You've got the option of finally having a cheap term-time holiday or possibly just taking your holiday in the holidays. Would DH be able to cover some of the childcare too? If so, you could continue with the term-time nursery, possibly.

Would the use of your own car not being reimbursed?

Will it really be more hours when you factor in all the extra work teachers do?

Does it offer any long term advantages over teaching? Promotions/pay rises that sort of thing.

Whatawaytomakealiving Fri 12-May-17 21:34:06

It maybe that even though you don't get school holidays (what holidays anyway with the work we do during them?) there maybe less of a need to be 'in the office' when schools are closed. I worked for an LA and this was the case. School holidays meant time to catch up with paperwork, read plans, write statements. This could be done at home. There were some meeting days but not as many. I didn't actually notice much difference. (But then reflecting on my last 6 week holiday from school, I can't remember having a break except for my week abroad)

It would be worth you asking the question?

rollonthesummer Fri 12-May-17 21:36:09

Can you take holidays during term time?

ASauvingnonADay Fri 12-May-17 21:41:25

I once had a school-but-no-holidays job, and I couldn't take holiday in term time, which was quite restrictive. Otherwise all was good.

youarenotkiddingme Fri 12-May-17 21:44:46

I'd consider what the hours involved over a year will be compared to the hours involved in teaching.
It may be less!

When does LO start school? When they do does the childcare cost compare to what you're paying now for term time only if it's wrap around care and holiday clubs?
I'd also look at WFH options during school holidays.

Sometimes quality of life improves with a job change even if financial circumstances remain the same.

1nsanityscatching Fri 12-May-17 21:50:48

Ds works for the LA in a school support role and works school holidays and travels around the County visiting schools. He receives a mileage allowance of I think 49p per mile (could be more now as I'm remembering from a few years back) which is standard for our LA.

Rufus27 Fri 12-May-17 23:05:00

Thanks so much. Lots to think about here that I'd not considered. DS is one so a while til he's at school and DP works really irregular shifts ( no two weeks ever the same) plus he's not allowed holiday in school hols which is annoying. I will call on Monday and find out more.

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