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NQTs with children

(37 Posts)
littlebid Mon 11-Jan-16 12:15:55

I'm starting the second term of my PGCE (secondary MFL) and beginning to look at jobs. When I start (hopefully) in September, my little girl will be 18 months old and I'm realising that the other parents on my course are all looking for part time work. They've all said they feel the workload will be unmanageable with a family at home.

PT just won't be an option for us financially so really I was just hoping for some reassurance that I will survive. I'm a career changer after 10 years in fairly high pressure roles, I'm a very organised person and I have excellent family support.

Has anyone been in the same situation and can offer reassurance or tips?

Thanks!

jellyfrizz Mon 11-Jan-16 16:47:40

I do 3 days and still struggle for time with my children but I have no family nearby and my partner works long hours.
Friends of mine are lone parents and make ft work with the help of supportive family. I think it also depends on the school, they can differ vastly in what is expected. At my current school we are in at 7.30 and don't leave until 6.
It's not a family friendly career at many schools.

jellyfrizz Mon 11-Jan-16 16:48:29

If you need to make it work, you will. Good luck!

jellyfrizz Mon 11-Jan-16 16:51:55

I'm primary too though. From what I hear secondary can be slightly easier in terms of workload.

SisterViktorine Mon 11-Jan-16 18:16:18

Look for a school where the Head and as many of SLT as possible also have young children.

In my school the Head regularly does her own school runs and accepts that other people will be doing that too.

kaitlinktm Mon 11-Jan-16 18:28:37

I'm primary too though. From what I hear secondary can be slightly easier in terms of workload

Swings and roundabouts.

TheFallenMadonna Mon 11-Jan-16 18:32:32

You will survive. I mentored an NQT last year with small children. She struggled first half term, then got in her stride. Teaching is family friendly. The holidays make it so.

Blue14 Mon 11-Jan-16 18:36:44

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TheFallenMadonna Mon 11-Jan-16 18:38:30

Secondary MFL? I would disagree about those hours.

TheFallenMadonna Mon 11-Jan-16 18:39:47

14 hours a day, 7 days a week? No.

Blue14 Mon 11-Jan-16 18:40:42

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TheFallenMadonna Mon 11-Jan-16 18:42:15

Unusual, in my experience.

Louise43210 Mon 11-Jan-16 18:43:04

I teach and have 4 children. Its not ideal. But its doable in the right place. At work don't be a martyr but always be honest. If you miss a deadline because your child is I'll say so. If you (later) need time off for Christmas concerts / Sports day, ask. Try to work like crazy in the week to take the load off the weekends. Good luck. X

Blue14 Mon 11-Jan-16 18:43:42

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Louise43210 Mon 11-Jan-16 18:44:19

I'll = unwell!

TheFallenMadonna Mon 11-Jan-16 18:47:35

I don't know any teacher who works 100 hours a week. We have pinch points of course. But I think saying it is standard for a secondary MFL teacher is misleading.

wannabestressfree Mon 11-Jan-16 18:50:55

I work full time and have three children. Am also a single parent and have a crohnic illness! Of course its doable and I don't do 100 hours a week! I teach English, have a strict routine and tend to get up early. I also have a day off at the weekend!

oscarandelliesdad Mon 11-Jan-16 19:01:18

I managed with a one year old. It was a slog though. Good luck!

Tillyscoutsmum Mon 11-Jan-16 19:55:50

I'm an NQT with an 8 and 6 year old. Single mum. No family support (albeit ex h does have regular access). I'm in primary if that helps. Is it doable? Yes imo. Do I have much of a life outside of my dc's and work. No. I still love it though smile

FannyGlum Mon 11-Jan-16 19:58:01

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DitheringDiva Mon 11-Jan-16 20:42:13

I did it, but that was about 10 years ago. In the right school, it's doable, even now I would say. I've actually found it much harder to work full-time as my children have got older. At 18 months, I took them to nursery at 7.30, drove to work, worked as late as I dared, pick up from nursery 6pm, home, no need for tea for them, because they'd eaten every hour at nursery, in bed by 7-7.30. I could sit down and eat with my husband, and do an hour or so of work before bed. There's never any assemblies/nativities/coffee mornings/activity mornings at nurseries in work-time because they know everyone's working, whereas our primary school is always organising this kind of thing, and I feel so guilty if I miss them.

Now - as well as the stuff going on in school that I want to attend, both children (mainly my older DD) also do stuff after school, every night of the week, and Saturdays and sometimes Sundays. I either have to rush off early to get my younger DD to whatever she's doing that evening and/or my older DD is doing something which doesn't finish until 9pm. I also have to get them their tea at some point between one activity and another. I now work part-time!

jellyfrizz Mon 11-Jan-16 21:36:49

kaitlin, yes maybe, just going on the DfE figures for hours worked and from friends and colleagues.

kaitlinktm Mon 11-Jan-16 23:08:01

Used to be secondary MFL myself - now semi-retired - I always felt it was hard work but I hate it when the primary versus secondary argument arises. I do part-time in primary now and yes, they do work hard, but heck - so did I!

strawberryandaflake Mon 11-Jan-16 23:13:59

Nqt year is fine as you get a reduced timetable. It's the year after when you get a full load that sucks. That's when most trainees quit.

rollonthesummer Mon 11-Jan-16 23:18:50

Nqt year is fine as you get a reduced timetable. It's the year after when you get a full load that sucks. That's when most trainees quit

I totally agree with this. PGCE was hard, NQT year was harder but the year after nearly finished me off-total responsibility, no regular NQT release time and a subject responsibility thrown in!

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