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Teaching non-degree subject

(8 Posts)
DetectiveLund Tue 28-Jul-15 10:45:26

I am passionate about one of my A level subjects (English lit) and less so about my degree subject (Mfl). Would I be able to train to be a secondary English teacher or would it need to be Mfl? And how about getting a job afterwards?

MrsUltracrepidarian Wed 29-Jul-15 12:13:51

For the training you will need to do you degree subject - however afterwards when you get a job you can offer to help out in other depts. and worm your way into a job like that.
I am an MFL teacher, but now teacher Physics and Maths (I don't even have a GCSE in Physics, but schools are desperate).

IHeartKingThistle Wed 29-Jul-15 12:15:42

I got in to teach English in 2000 with an English Language / Linguistics degree and even then they made it clear I'd only just got in and they'd rather I'd have had Lit!

Happy36 Wed 29-Jul-15 17:03:11

At my school, teachers are required (where needed) to teach any of the subjects they studied at A Level.

However, MrsUltra's advice above, about your training, is correct.

Luciferbox Wed 29-Jul-15 17:08:58

Both DH and I are teachers. DH's degree is not related to the subject he now teaches. Instead he worked for a number of years in his new field and gained a place on a pgce course because of his experience. Some universities are more flexible than others. Our local uni (not the one we trained at) has so few people on their teacher training degrees (60% drop) this year they've been rather open about who they accept.

Salmotrutta Wed 29-Jul-15 17:51:03

You wouldn't be able to do this in Scotland - you are only allowed to teach the subject(s) that your degree provides enough credit points in.

A physicist could probably teach physics and Maths for example and Historians can probably teach History and Modern Studies because their degrees have enough content in each subject.

And you have to be dual registered with the GTCS as well (or have Professional Recognition for the second subject as they call it nowadays I think)

noblegiraffe Wed 29-Jul-15 18:14:34

You can get up to £25,000 bursary to train to teach MFL (depending on degree class) but only up to £9000 for English.

I suspect with the new requirements for all children to sit the Ebacc you would find it easier to get a job teaching MFL as well.

getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding

DetectiveLund Wed 29-Jul-15 20:55:46

Thanks! I've been an English (as a foreign language) teacher for the last decade or so, but think will apply for mfl and then try and get my Shakespeare on once qualified grin

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