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One kitten or two?!

(29 Posts)
theSnuffster Wed 07-Nov-18 21:28:24

We've been talking for years about getting a kitten. The opportunity has now come up via someone that my OH knows, so we went to see them a few days ago. There are two- a very lively and playful male or a placid, quiet female. Both looked to be in good health, the owner of the parents was very knowledgable etc so we've decided to go for it. We intended on choosing one but I'm now so tempted to get both! My main reason is that they'd most likely be indoor cats, and days a week we're all out at school and work for 6 hours- I worry that one would be lonely and bored- is that even a thing?!

I'd be really grateful for any advice please!

OP’s posts: |
viccat Wed 07-Nov-18 21:31:03

Absolutely 100% two!
I volunteer for a rescue and can say kittens that grow up with a sibling/another kitten are much, much better socialised and generally happier and healthier. They will support each other in the adjustment to a new home, keep each other entertained by playing and it will be much easier for you as well.

ChocoBanana Wed 07-Nov-18 21:34:28

Definitely both - they keep each other entertained when you're out and once you've got one furniture shredder and hair shedder you might as well have two! Ours burn off lots of energy chasing each other through the house and then curl up together - we have a boy girl pair.

FourteenCows Wed 07-Nov-18 21:35:34

Definitely two if it’s an option! They are fun to watch together

zzzzz Wed 07-Nov-18 21:36:27

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Varmints Wed 07-Nov-18 21:38:26

Definitely take them both 😻

theSnuffster Wed 07-Nov-18 21:40:06

Thank you! I'll be honest I'm a little worried about the cost. I want to be realistic and not get caught up in how adorable they are!!

I've had a quick look and it's looking like the pet health plan at the vets (to cover annual vaccinations, flea prevention, etc) is £13 a month per cat, insurance about £8 a month per cat. Spay £80, castration £56. No idea what it'll cost for food and litter. Are there any other costs involved?

OP’s posts: |
Santaispolishinghissleigh Wed 07-Nov-18 21:41:15

Another vote for 2.

itsbritneybiatches Wed 07-Nov-18 21:45:09

We have two brothers from the same litter. They play fight, keep each other company, Snuggle up, chase each other, but are totally different personalities.
It's nice to watch them be affectionate and groom each other.

One literally has no fucks to give. The other one is timid and more loving.

viccat Wed 07-Nov-18 22:00:09

I think in general if you can afford one, you can afford two... vet's plans and insurance usually have a multipet discount of a few pounds, and most of your big purchases like litter trays, cat trees, carrier, toys etc. you would be getting anyway.

At the charity where I volunteer we don't rehome solo kittens at all because it's just not good for them to grow up alone. If someone can only adopt one, we recommend an adult cat.

Wolfiefan Wed 07-Nov-18 22:03:09

Two. They will tore each other out. Well eventually.
A word of caution though. Responsible people neuter their pets so either these are pedigrees from a breeder or some idiot trying to make some cash for Christmas.
Not too late to rescue.

MsNowtyBach Wed 07-Nov-18 22:36:28

Two from the same litter works well. They like the company, less needy of you etc.

There are more cats than homes, so take two if you can.

AnnaMagnani Wed 07-Nov-18 22:43:20

Two. They chase each other instead of shredding your furniture.

Plus it's double the cuddles, double the cuteness, double the purring, Double the love.

Grumpyoldpersonwithcats Thu 08-Nov-18 05:43:57

To reiterate everything above - get two. Much better for the kittens and easier on you.

MoonlightMedicine Thu 08-Nov-18 05:49:33

Definitely two!

JanetLovesJason Thu 08-Nov-18 06:06:36

Two

Villanelle123 Thu 08-Nov-18 06:12:56

Absolutely two.

MrsSchadenfreude Thu 08-Nov-18 06:14:05

Two! 😻

theSnuffster Thu 08-Nov-18 06:42:45

Looks like it could be two then! 🙊

OP’s posts: |
theSnuffster Thu 08-Nov-18 07:40:17

Is there anything else I need to consider with two? This is possibly silly but I'm worried about things like food- what if one of them eats all of it leaving the other with none?! What if they're fussy and I end up having to buy different foods for each?!

OP’s posts: |
Wolfiefan Thu 08-Nov-18 07:52:31

The biggest issue would be getting them neutered early enough.

theSnuffster Thu 08-Nov-18 08:01:35

That's definitely top of the list, the vet I've spoken to offers a free check for new kittens/ puppies (the idea being that you take them in the day or day after you get them) so I can get the neutering booked then.

OP’s posts: |
Grumpyoldpersonwithcats Thu 08-Nov-18 08:07:04

I've never found feeding a problem with multiple cats. Here are my current cats (two 8 year old siblings and two 8 month old siblings.)

tumpymummy Thu 08-Nov-18 08:25:26

We have 2 but just to let you know that siblings don't always get on! A bit like humans. Ours used to play together when little but as they have got older (Now 5) they have grown further apart and now pretty much avoid each other. The only time they do anything together is when they go hunting as they will catch mice together. Also feeding them isn't a problem as they are happy to eat together. So all I'm saying is if you are worried about the cost of 2 having 2 isn't always wonderful! I think mine would be quite happy if the other weren't around. A friend also has only one female cat and has done from a kitten.

AnnaMagnani Thu 08-Nov-18 09:30:29

Cat siblings naturally drift apart at about 2-3. They might still be bonded or they might hate each other. But you don't get the kitten years forever.

In terms of fussiness, well cats are fussy and they would convince you that they can only eat fresh wild caught Alaskan salmon - if you let them!

A bit like toddlers, there is a difference between genuine food preferences and 'You are havin' a laugh matey'. Unless it's for a genuine health problem, mine don't get different diets.

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