Is it a terrible idea to let a new cat out the house on day 9?

(24 Posts)
TinyBit Thu 14-May-15 15:55:03

He's 9 months old and seems to have settled well with us. He's dying to get out and it's getting tricky stopping him making a dash for freedom every time the door opens.

I was thinking I might let him out tomorrow on Day 9 as I'm around all day to keep an eye on him.

Is it a stupid idea?

Fluffycloudland77 Thu 14-May-15 16:31:56

Yes.

TinyBit Thu 14-May-15 16:35:51

Ok

CloserToFiftyThanTwenty Thu 14-May-15 16:50:57

Well... We've never managed to keep ours inside for that long, and they have both always come back...

What is your situation: if you've only moved him around the corner he could remember where he used to live. If you back onto big fields with no fence to climb he could go for a wander. If not, well , he's got to go outside for the first time at some point

TinyBit Thu 14-May-15 16:56:42

I've no idea where he was from originally.

Our garden backs on to other gardens (and there's a few other cats around).

roomonmybroom Thu 14-May-15 17:02:36

I have with all of mine, they are just itching to explore and have a sniff around, if your garden is quiet and secure it should be fine, I usually wander around the garden with them the first few times, don't just let him out and leave him to it, and have something tasty to hand to tempt back indoors.

kinkytoes Thu 14-May-15 17:10:11

Two weeks is standard isn't it?

bonzo77 Thu 14-May-15 17:11:58

Terrible idea. unless you don't mind fretting for hours when he wont come back. I keep mine in for at least a month while they learn the feeding routine and to come to call.

mrsdavidbowie Thu 14-May-15 17:13:12

Ours escaped the first day shock
Sauntered back in that evening.

Fluffycloudland77 Thu 14-May-15 17:13:22

4 Weeks is advised.

It's less stressful than losing them. I kept an active Bengal in for 4 weeks when we moved. I know it's not fun for any of you, and they are so good at the plaintive miaows.

dailyfix Thu 14-May-15 17:15:49

We're getting a 2 year old, do we need to keep her in 2 weeks? We would be distraught if we lost her.
DH thinks he'll take her out in the garden on a lead, is that mad?
We're very rural, surrounded by fields if that makes a difference.

Fluffycloudland77 Thu 14-May-15 17:19:48

I've always kept ours in for 4 weeks, by then he's spent hours looking longingly and reproachfully out of windows so he knows where he's going.

Losingmyreligion Thu 14-May-15 17:23:17

I think 2 weeks is standard advice ( I googled it when weoved recently). Try to stick to that if he's new to you.

imjustahead Thu 14-May-15 17:27:54

i have always kept mine in for about a month, as tricky as it is and as vigilant you have to be I wouldn't risk it before then.

Nothing worse than thinking they have scarpered, or have been hit by a car.

I also have a cat harness, which i have used on mine for a wander around the for the first few sessions. I might be overly cautious but, a scared cat can bolt, and get disorientated, plus other cats or dogs can be intimidating.

noddyholder Thu 14-May-15 17:29:55

Depends on the garden etc and the cats I suppose. I let mine out straight away we have moved many times and its never been an issue Leave the back door open and they come back in once they have sniffed around a bit

RubbishMantra Thu 14-May-15 17:33:33

Yup, unless it's a cat who's very bonded to you, at least 4 weeks. I may have read your posts incorrectly, but it seems as if he's only been living with you for 9 days?

Like Fluffy says, they get their bearings from looking out the windows. During that time, he'll bond to you and work out his core territory. Use that time to get him addicted to Dreamies/treat of choice. So he'll come running at the rattle of a packet. Useful indeed.

TinyBit Thu 14-May-15 18:03:08

4 weeks??

OK, I'd hate for anything to happen to him so we'll keep him in.

SweetCicely Thu 14-May-15 19:15:43

We kept our rescue cats in for six weeks when we got them. The shelter recommended four weeks as a minimum but said they'd be more likely to stick near the house if we kept them in for six as they'd really see it as their territory to protect. They were fine indoors so I think we were lucky. Now they can't wait to go out.

lljkk Thu 14-May-15 19:19:11

My mom never waited more than 3 days. <<Shrug>> Worked for us.

Archfarchnad Thu 14-May-15 19:35:04

We were told at least four weeks by the rescue shelter and intended to stick to that, but Archcat thought differently and turned out to be damn good at slipping out of slightly opened doors. He got out the first time after living with us for two weeks, and I pessimistically assumed that was it, we'd lost him for good - it was dark when he got out and we couldn't see him anywhere. Sat down on the doorstep and started wailing at my own incompetence at losing a cat so quickly. Obviously he sauntered back half an hour later, doing the 'what's your problem' face. And in the nine months since then, he goes out regularly in the daytime, but has never been gone longer than 2-3 hours, so he seems fairly attached to us and the house.

Stinkersmum Sat 16-May-15 14:34:22

I've always let my cats out after one night when we've moved house. But I guess that's because they know me. I never really understand how a cat is supposed to get to know it's surroundings if you don't let them out....

As it's a new cat to you, maybe leave it a few more days. And the day you do, let them out before you've fed them. It's easier to entice a hungry cat back in.

Monten Sat 16-May-15 14:43:05

4 weeks shock. Wow. Have always let mine out after a couple of days, but they area new to me and they're homebodies really who don't stray far.

Did you get him from a shelter op? If so just think of all the lovely extra space he has indoors now smile

Monten Sat 16-May-15 14:43:54

They aren't new to me

PolterGoose Sat 16-May-15 15:05:51

Assuming he's generally settled and bonding well in the house I would be tempted to let him out, but I would do it in the morning when he's hungry. There's a risk at the moment of him making a dash and darting off, so letting him out in a more controlled way could be less risky.

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