rescue greyhound

(24 Posts)
karala Wed 09-Sep-20 18:33:04

We're going to meet a rescue greyhound at the weekend and according to his report he is quite nervous but once he gets to know you he is friendly. There's no aggression with him but the one thing that worries me is that he is not happy to get into a car and the report said that he will need training with this. How realistic is this? I mean, we need to get him home for one thing and I'm reluctant to make a timid dog do something he doesn't want to do just before moving to a new place. We need him to get used to a car because of our lifestyle and I wondered how realistic it is that we can train him into this. We have no greyhound experience - we've had jack russells and labradors. Any advice, experience would be much appreciated

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CadiM Wed 09-Sep-20 19:57:36

I've had my rescue grey for 2 months now. She refused to jump into the car for the first month and needed to be lifted in: completely disinterested in bribery with treats and her front legs would shake so badly if I tried lifting them in first that she would start to collapse. And then one day after a trip to a dog field she just suddenly did it. I think she realised that the car trips meant fun so it was worth the (minimal) effort. She needs encouragement to lie down though and that's where the cheese bribery comes in handy. I think she would have mastered in faster but I don't need to use the car much. Good luck with your meeting!

karala Wed 09-Sep-20 20:52:09

CadiM

I've had my rescue grey for 2 months now. She refused to jump into the car for the first month and needed to be lifted in: completely disinterested in bribery with treats and her front legs would shake so badly if I tried lifting them in first that she would start to collapse. And then one day after a trip to a dog field she just suddenly did it. I think she realised that the car trips meant fun so it was worth the (minimal) effort. She needs encouragement to lie down though and that's where the cheese bribery comes in handy. I think she would have mastered in faster but I don't need to use the car much. Good luck with your meeting!

thank you - that sounds very encouraging. I'll report back on our date

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Scattyhattie Wed 09-Sep-20 23:02:39

My dogs struggled a bit negotiating the boot lip, I think roof height on our car probably also looked low as they'd travelled in a van previously which is much easier to get in. For a while so would just lift (easier for me to do front legs in and then boost rear) sometimes they'd attempt to get in & they did eventually jump in. Can feed very tasty treats or all meals in the boot to give a good association without moving the car. Like PP associating going on walks with car is eventually a motivation.

If really struggle there's ramps/steps
which may make easier, sometimes if have very high boot its a good idea to use anyway as the impact on landing isn't good for the joints. However they also require time to train.

UnexpectedItemInShaggingArea Wed 09-Sep-20 23:08:12

My sister's dog (not a greyhound) vomits in fear every time it has to travel in a car. It's been 2 years...

Borderstotheleftofme Wed 09-Sep-20 23:19:44

I wouldn’t knowingly purchase or rescue a nervous dog.

They say he isn’t aggressive and that may well be true but equally, if he’s in kennels he probably isn’t showing his full ‘true’ personality and the vast majority of aggression is based in fear.

Even if he genuinely is ‘just’ nervous with no aggression whatsoever I wouldn’t underestimate just how hard behavioural issues can be.

karala Thu 10-Sep-20 07:38:50

thanks all for your replies - we need to think very carefully where we go from here. I'm very grateful for you all sharing your experience and knowledge

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Roodog Fri 11-Sep-20 12:06:58

Are you getting him from one of the greyhound rehoming organisations? How much support have they offered regarding training and car things etc?

RuthW Fri 11-Sep-20 12:16:49

One of our greys doesn't like the car. A lot of greys are nervous but they make lovely pets, but do your homework. They are not normal dogs at all.

karala Fri 11-Sep-20 15:07:47

Roodog

Are you getting him from one of the greyhound rehoming organisations? How much support have they offered regarding training and car things etc?

he is with the Dog's Trust and they say that they offer lifetime support - I have never gone down the rescue route before so would appreciate any words of wisdom

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Roodog Fri 11-Sep-20 19:02:04

I'm afraid I can't offer much advice. We're due to get our rehomed greyhound at the end of Oct, coming from The Greyhound Trust. They've given us a lot of advice and reading material but also seem to be very clear on warning of pitfalls and making sure we're prepared for training etc. They have sort of matched the dog to our circumstances and explained that they have other dogs they're rehoming, but they wouldn't match them to us for various reasons. I kind of feel reassured by this process. I supposed I'm saying make sure you're happy with their support now and ongoing and whether they and you have been completely open and are completely prepared (although there will always be an element of the unknown).

79andnotout Sat 12-Sep-20 08:35:47

Both of mine really struggled getting into our car to begin with, they were used to ramps and vans. They needed lifting in (awkwardly as they're as big as me!).

That was pretty short lived though. Now whenever I take them for a walk they stand hopefully by the car looking at me first, they bloody love a car journey, the lazy sods!

Wolfiefan Sat 12-Sep-20 08:40:58

I would want to know what happens when you try and get him in a car. What happened when he was transported to them?
He may struggle not to get in. But once in does he bark or tremble or wet himself in fear? Is he better in a crate? I would want as much info as I could get.

BovaryX Sat 12-Sep-20 08:44:45

Had a rescue greyhound as a teen. They are a lovely, gentle dog and she was an adored pet. I agree with PP, hopefully he will get over his car anxiety once he associates it with enjoyable activities, not a past trauma. Good luck and would like to hear update.

karala Sat 12-Sep-20 13:19:48

Wolfiefan

I would want to know what happens when you try and get him in a car. What happened when he was transported to them?
He may struggle not to get in. But once in does he bark or tremble or wet himself in fear? Is he better in a crate? I would want as much info as I could get.

my understanding is that so far he just refused to get in a car when the staff were doing his observations - we're having a meet this afternoon and I will raise these points.

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karala Sat 12-Sep-20 13:22:23

thanks to all who have replied - we are off to meet him this afternoon and I have done a lot of reading and have many questions. I'll report back. We won't be taking him immediately because he has to be neutered so it would be a little while yet.

We've been in touch with this rescue centre a lot and they sort of know us and I know that sometimes they have had dogs who are so timid they can't be rehomed immediately and have to have multiple visits before they can leave the centre. Anyway thanks again and I'll report back

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userxx Sat 12-Sep-20 13:31:43

Greyhounds are fabulous, I'm sure you'll haven fallen in love by the end of the afternoon!

Wolfiefan Sat 12-Sep-20 15:35:26

Could be as simple as it didn’t smell right!! Or he didn’t feel comfortable jumping in. Good luck.

karala Sat 12-Sep-20 17:32:31

Hello everyone

we met the dog who was lovely but timid. After spending some time together and with a member of staff we agreed that we weren't the right people to take this dog. However we were introduced to another dog they felt would be more suitable to our life-style, a bit younger and very energetic and we are thinking seriously about it. It's a collie crossed with every other dog you could imagine and has some training needs but nothing that is insurmountable.
We come from dog families and we've had dogs previously and are both very much of the view that it's like getting married - any doubts then don't commit - thanks for the advice and help and interest

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Wolfiefan Sat 12-Sep-20 18:59:56

Hoping you find the right match. Years ago we were looking for a pair of rescue cats. I remember being shown a pair of nervous black cats. They let us touch them and the shelter were eager we consider them. But we worked full time and felt we couldn’t spend the hours they needed every day. We opted for another pair. It was the right decision. Here’s hoping you’ve found your one!

karala Sat 12-Sep-20 20:15:40

thanks Wolfie

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UnexpectedItemInShaggingArea Sun 13-Sep-20 08:59:07

Dog 2 sounds fab. I think we have one of those. Fingers crossed both dogs find their forever homes.

userxx Sun 13-Sep-20 09:13:44

Greyhounds can be very timid, a lot of them have had really shit lives. Some come out of their shell after time, others don't. Good luck with dog number 2, he sounds more suited to your needs.

Tappering Sun 13-Sep-20 09:17:42

Greys don't tend to respond well to change. They like familiarity and routine. But once they've got used to something they're fine. @userxx is correct in that lots tend to need some TLC as they've had quite shit lives up to that point. But a worthwhile investment as once they settle they make very loyal and affectionate house dogs. Glad you've found the right dog for your needs.

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