adopting a greyhound

(40 Posts)
Roodog Sun 16-Aug-20 16:26:53

After years of wanting to qdopt a greyhound, we are finally in a position where we're looking like we can do it.

I've been in touch with a couple of places that rehome greyhounds, some retired racers and others that haven't raced for whatever reason.

I've done lots of research and have what appears to be a very helpful book, Retired Racing Greyhounds for Dummies'. I just wondered if anyone had any experiences they'd like to share, or dos and don'ts to help us on our way.

We are hoping to find an adoptee in the autumn.

Thank you

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Scattyhattie Sun 16-Aug-20 17:54:58

They're a fabulous breed, I've had mix of youngster's that trained and a racers over the years. I've only a bull greyhound now but want another racing bred grey in future.
I liked the greyhound for dummies book it covers pretty much everything, the racing side is a bit different in America & they are also much more foster based grey rescue than here. Clicker training does work well for them, although they've short attention spans & need a reward they deem worthwhile, you'll find that as such amenable dogs often people don't do much with them & viewed as dim.

From my experience I'd say some greyhound rescues are much better at assessing their dogs around other animals & different environments and that can make a huge difference to success in matching with the right owner.
Most people the adjustment to living in a house & toilet training is manageable but you don't want the shock of finding the dope on a rope dog switches to a rearing, spinning nutter on sight of some dogs running at the park or super shy of strangers & tries to bolt, if not then in a position to be able to work on those things.

Roodog Sun 16-Aug-20 22:12:05

Thank you, good to hear the book is recommended.

The people I've been in touch with seem to take it very seriously. We've had a call today and weregoing to meet a 2 Yr old female next week. I'm excited and apprehensive. Plan to take the kids with us but need to make sure they're prepared to accept that we might meet this one but she might not be for us.

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Ccccchanges Sun 16-Aug-20 22:40:02

This thread might be helpful -
www.mumsnet.com/Talk/the_doghouse/3964906-Greyhounds

They are an absolutely fantastic breed - we have a retired racing greyhound and now looking to rehome another! In a way I think the right dog will pick you, but do make sure you go up and walk them more than once and at different times during the day. Feel free to Pm me if you have any specific questions.

Have fun!

greyhoundexplorer Sun 16-Aug-20 23:29:02

We've had ours for 2 weeks and wouldn't be without her. She never raced and is young. She's quite nervous but coming out of her shell slowly.
They don't bark or shed particularly and are very lazy.

Ours won't do her business in the garden so she's getting 3-4 walks a day of between 10 and 30 minutes. The rest of the time she sleeps!

She's so laid back and placid, great with kids and very tolerant.

I'll be pushing for another in a few years

Roodog Mon 17-Aug-20 08:38:50

Thank you both. @Ccccchanges I will have a look at that thread and might message you if we have questions. Congratulations @greyhoundexplorer, sounds like you're very happy!

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Hoppinggreen Mon 17-Aug-20 08:45:29

They are a lovely breed, beautiful looking and generally very calm.
I would say be careful though as a retired couple near us adopted one and although she is lovely with humans she tries to eat smaller dogs and is terrified of bigger ones. Within days of her arriving she almost killed another neighbours small dog and now has to be muzzled when out at all times. Unfortunately the action the owner had to take to get her to drop the small dog seems to have made her afraid of one of her owners too and only his wife can walk her now, although they are working on this and there has been some improvement.
She quakes in terror if she sees us with our dopey retriever and we have to be very careful not to get too close to her.
I think in this case it is just a case of naivity and a bit of a mismatch, they cant do the things they hoped to do with her and I dont think the Rescue were entirely honest so if you do your research it should be ok

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greyhoundexplorer Mon 17-Aug-20 13:08:18

Ones that have raced can have a very high prey drive, and must be muzzled around small animals. Often this includes cats and small dogs.

Ours never raced as she was too timid. Consequently she spots the wild rabbits on our walks but doesn't chase them, so we safely ditched the muzzle

Scattyhattie Mon 17-Aug-20 15:37:19

Greyhounds often only see other greyhounds during their lives at kennels so can be unsure what these creatures of various shapes & sizes are, something to be chased or something that may attack them?

I'd avoid busy parks early on as all the movement can be overstimulating and tends to always be those 'friendly' rude dogs that charge over. Its better to control interactions so can make positive experiences not scary.

It depends where adopt from but majority of greyhound rescues include a muzzle at adoption & advise its use while dog adjusts to new world & owner learns its reactions needn't be forever & is a useful bit of kit (I've trained my mutt to be happy to wear one since).
My super, high prey drive ex-racer (well 5 racesgrin) was eventually great with dogs of all sizes once had realised what they were & seems most greyhounds become ok with dogs. Still would exercise caution letting them run with smaller dogs in open spaces.

Dogs that are unraced can be for various reasons like too small or large, injury, too slow, they also get struck off for interfering with other dogs or not running in a safe way on the track. So would be unwise to assume a lack of prey drive, also they chase a flappy lure or bit of fluffy sheepskin training so real prey could be of more interest.

Depends on the individual but at 2yrs they are like big puppies, bit silly & may still be in a chewy phase. A more active greyhound still isn't going to be like a busy spaniel though.

Elderflower14 Mon 17-Aug-20 16:06:20

My Mum owned the naughtiest most loving and gorgeous greyhound called Tyler. In the time she has him his exploits included ripping open a packet of 16 loo rolls and biting every one.. Snaffled 3/4 of a Simnel Cake including the disciples... He smashed a bottle of wine to get to and eat a whole box of chocolates. He ate six bird fat balls, got his head stuck in an empty grab bag of crisps and most terrifying was one morning after breakfast and a walk he flopped down in front of Mum on his bed. I was reading the newspaper and he suddenly started choking... We were terrified... He suddenly went BLEUUUUUGH and something bounced across and landed at Mum's foot surrounded by his breakfast... Mum picked it up "Oh my god he's swallowed a battery....!" "Hang on dear, its a bit squishy..." . It was only a bloody wine cork which he'd found in the garden the precious day. Thankfully it went down lengthways!
He got his tail shut in the car boot once, also flicked his tail on the radiator which resulted in the house looking like set of a slasher film. Blood trickling down the walls. He had the tip of his tail removed after that... He also put his paw down a drain as well which resulted in several weeks wearing a tee shirt on his front paws...
One piece of advice. Greyhounds like the whole sofa.. Tyler used to spread out so we ended up sitting on the arms of the sofa!

greyhoundexplorer Mon 17-Aug-20 19:22:26

Elderflower14

My Mum owned the naughtiest most loving and gorgeous greyhound called Tyler. In the time she has him his exploits included ripping open a packet of 16 loo rolls and biting every one.. Snaffled 3/4 of a Simnel Cake including the disciples... He smashed a bottle of wine to get to and eat a whole box of chocolates. He ate six bird fat balls, got his head stuck in an empty grab bag of crisps and most terrifying was one morning after breakfast and a walk he flopped down in front of Mum on his bed. I was reading the newspaper and he suddenly started choking... We were terrified... He suddenly went BLEUUUUUGH and something bounced across and landed at Mum's foot surrounded by his breakfast... Mum picked it up "Oh my god he's swallowed a battery....!" "Hang on dear, its a bit squishy..." . It was only a bloody wine cork which he'd found in the garden the precious day. Thankfully it went down lengthways!
He got his tail shut in the car boot once, also flicked his tail on the radiator which resulted in the house looking like set of a slasher film. Blood trickling down the walls. He had the tip of his tail removed after that... He also put his paw down a drain as well which resulted in several weeks wearing a tee shirt on his front paws...
One piece of advice. Greyhounds like the whole sofa.. Tyler used to spread out so we ended up sitting on the arms of the sofa!


He sounds amazing!

Elderflower14 Mon 17-Aug-20 20:09:16

@greyhoundexplorer. He was. We lost him very suddenly three years ago... House is very different without him..

Roodog Mon 17-Aug-20 22:20:34

@Elderflower14 what a character! We've known a labrador that ate an entire big box of Cadbury's Roses, wrappers and all, a Weimaraner that habitually got it's tail caught in the screen door and flicked blood all over the place, and the Springer we looked after when I was a kid swallowed a 200g block of cheddar cheese whole. Having all those incidents with one dog is pretty impressive.

I'm ready for lots of recall training and wearing a muzzle for some time until we get to know their personality.

Even if we fall for this one we're going to see, she's in heat at the moment so it will be a while before we can bring her home. I understand the adoption people will get her spayed first.

Thanks for all the tips and tales.

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Elderflower14 Mon 17-Aug-20 22:26:08

Forgot to add the time my niece hollowed out a beautiful pumpkin for Halloween and Tyler pinched the lid... Niece repeated the exercise... So did Tyler!!! 🙊 🙊 🙊 🙊 🙊
Very orange poos for a few days!! 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣

greyhoundexplorer Mon 17-Aug-20 23:18:17

Elderflower14

**@greyhoundexplorer**. He was. We lost him very suddenly three years ago... House is very different without him..


I'm so sorry to hear that daffodil

Pacif1cDogwood Mon 17-Aug-20 23:33:21

Greyhounds make fab pets - I'm glad you have arrived at the same conclusion smile

We have had ours for over 5 years now, had him from 18/12 old, he never raced as 'too playful', read absolutely nuts!

We fostered a dog before we adopted and would have kept him but he was promised to a family with a cat as he was 'cat safe'. They are definitely individuals though - ours goes after squirrels and cats (thankfully only when he gets a chance which is, like, never and it has led to the neighbourhood cats no longer pooing in our garden. Nor do the foxes, come to think of it).
Foster dog chewed remote controls and books, DHound has never chewed anything.
Foster dog was v laid back and tolerant of all sorts, DHound can be grumpy around tall, young men ?bad experiences in his past.
Foster dog ate quite well and gained some weight from his previous racing weight, DHound weighs not a single gram more than when we got him, delisted my best efforts to feed him up a bit.

So, race characteristics are one thing, but individual dogs can still surprise you.

Go for a rescue that fosters their dogs and knows them well.

We had a crate because he was used to one. We stopped using it after maybe a year or so. Sometimes I miss it when he's booed in the kitchen.

He is nervous and absolutely terrified of fireworks, I am already dreading Guy Fawkes as he turns in to a shaking, salivating, panting, pacing wreck, even with meds from the vet.

His farts would clear whole stadiums!! envy <-not envy

Kids love him, his zoomies impress other dog walkers, he's really easy around the house (although he does follow me everywhere, including the bathroom) and we would not be without him.

Look up 'greyhound scream of death' - mine definitely does this when there is a minor bump, but he was recently quite stoic when he dislocated a toe! shock

The one thing I had not thought about when I v carefully researched what breed to go for was the size of a large breeds' poos.... just saying'.

Pacif1cDogwood Mon 17-Aug-20 23:33:41

Goodness, that was an essay! Sorry blush

Roodog Tue 18-Aug-20 06:03:33

Thanks again all of you.
On a practical note, how do you transport your dog in a car? We have a Renault Scenic so I'm wondering about something in the boot?

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greyhoundexplorer Tue 18-Aug-20 09:28:54

We have 1 dc so she sits on the back seat with him. She wears her harness and I got a clip that slots in the seatbelt and fastens to her harness. It works really well as you don't have to worry about escapees when someone opens the door
Think i got the clip in big Sainsbury's

greyhoundexplorer Tue 18-Aug-20 09:30:46

Here she is

Roodog Tue 18-Aug-20 11:25:01

@greyhoundexplorer thank you that sounds like a good option. She is beautiful.

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greyhoundexplorer Tue 18-Aug-20 23:30:48

She's getting cheeky now. So far tonight she has stolen a slice of bread and some Lego 😂😂😂

somm Sat 22-Aug-20 21:57:40

greyhoundexplorer > love to know rescued dogs are feeling safe. I'm not sure our boy would have been taken on if we hadn't found him. Now, he's living out his old age in a very comfy environment.

thatplaceinjordan Sat 22-Aug-20 22:01:14

They can be food obsessed so get some childlocks for the fridge, bin, microwave, oven and freezer- these are all places my greyhound had opened to steal food from.

Roodog Sun 23-Aug-20 16:55:45

We went to meet the potential pet today, and it's safe to say it was love at first sight. We're so excited, but got to wait a few weeks as she's in heat and will be spayed before coming to us. Thanks all for your tips and thoughts.

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