Red Setter or other?

(81 Posts)
KnobChops Thu 13-Aug-20 08:39:19

I’m planning to take early retirement (50) in the next 2 years, so will finally be ready for another dog. I’ve previously had a poodle and a cocker spaniel (long deceased).

Always loved the Red Setter and I want a dog that likes a walk so that I keep fit. We have 2 Burmese cats which were bred in a house with a dog, they’re pretty robust and confident and I’m sure can put a pup in their place. But it’s something to consider.

I always had the dogs sleep on the bed and the cats also sleep on the bed. I’m not sure if that’s the best way nowadays, I hear a lot of dogs sleep in crates?

Any experience of this breed or any others people might recommend? What is the moulting like? Any health issues to watch out for? Thanks

OP’s posts: |
bunnygeek Thu 13-Aug-20 12:06:21

Setters don't seem that common at the moment, don't see a lot of them about. They're beautiful dogs though.

My only experience is my grandparent's one. She was ancient by the time I came along but, as rescue Setter cross, her favourite game in younger days was start at the front door, run flat out through the house, out the back door, up the garden, turn around, come flying back, skid along the hallway INTO the front door, turn around and repeat. Be prepared for lunatic energy!

countrygirl99 Thu 13-Aug-20 12:08:22

Used to babysit for someone who had one. Lovely but loony.

KnobChops Thu 13-Aug-20 12:10:19

Oh she sounded lovely @bunnygeek, high energy not a problem.

OP’s posts: |
DramaAlpaca Thu 13-Aug-20 12:14:54

Beautiful dogs, mad as hatters, high energy and a can be a bit highly strung.

They are a gun dog breed so they need lots of exercise, so you'd need to be prepared to walk it a lot. I've never had one myself, so don't know about health issues or moulting.

In my experience gun dogs are generally good with cats. We have two springers and a cat, the dogs certainly know who's boss. I'll often find the three of them curled up together, which is very cute.

BeeyatchPlease Thu 13-Aug-20 12:15:07

My dad had a few red setters when I was growing up. They are beautiful dogs and like others have said, they're a bit nuts. I love them though.
It is a very headstrong breed, unbelievably stubborn as well so can somewhat tricky to train. They need a lot of firm, consistent handling and recall can be a nightmare so be mindful when letting them off the lead.
Having said that, they are lovely dogs and definitely the sort of breed if you plan to do lots of hikes. They can run and run and ruuuuun.

RandomMess Thu 13-Aug-20 12:15:31

Local couple had 2 stunning reds they walked them miles and were so calm out and about in town.

Then they got a third 😂😂😂 he was and still is a complete nutter and the next 2 also 90% nutter.

They are carriage dogs designed to run for miles every day...

You could teach a puppy to sleep where you want it to, would be a HUGE crate for a red!

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RandomMess Thu 13-Aug-20 12:18:32

I was confused they weren't a coach dog breed that predominantly dalmations and Great Danes!

Feralkidsatthecampsite Thu 13-Aug-20 12:20:02

My df had one when I was small. Ah she was adorable.. Only see 1 where I live. Majestic!!

BeeyatchPlease Thu 13-Aug-20 12:20:32

Forgot to add as well that they take a lot of grooming, certainly brushed at least every other day, that can help with the shedding about the house and the shedding is worse in Spring when the weather becomes more favourable.
Ours didn't have any health issues but they can be susceptible to hip and eye issues so perhaps ask about these types of checks when contacting breeders.

Feralkidsatthecampsite Thu 13-Aug-20 12:24:44

Not as much grooming as a Husky ime.

What about a Lurcher type?
We have 2 small ones and a saluki /deerhound Cross.
Love a walk or a sloth day!! Very affectionate and not much shedding!!
Fold up small also!

KnobChops Thu 13-Aug-20 12:28:25

Thanks everyone - happy to do a daily brush. The running miles and miles bit worries me a little as was thinking more 2 x 1 hour walks a day. We have a good sized garden.

Is the thinking these days to allow the dog to sleep on your bed? That would make me very happy (would persuade DH to upgrade to super king bed 😄). My last dog died 13 years ago. DD is 15 so we don’t need to worry about young children.

OP’s posts: |
Frlrlrubert Thu 13-Aug-20 12:30:01

Our two cockers (and occasionally the cat) sleep on the bed.

It's personal preference I think.

KnobChops Thu 13-Aug-20 12:30:57

Feralkidsatthecampsite

Not as much grooming as a Husky ime.

What about a Lurcher type?
We have 2 small ones and a saluki /deerhound Cross.
Love a walk or a sloth day!! Very affectionate and not much shedding!!
Fold up small also!

I did think about a whippet. Or a Doberman but not sure about barking? Enjoy a quiet dog. The cats talk non stop.

OP’s posts: |
Feralkidsatthecampsite Thu 13-Aug-20 12:31:08

Dpuppy has a snooze with me first thing but sleeps with adult ddogs downstairs. Own sofa though! She is too long of leg to sleep all night!! Already battle a 6'4 dh for space!
Imo your bed will be perfect..

HopelessSemantics Thu 13-Aug-20 12:36:40

They're gorgeous dogs, OP. Definitely high energy, two hours a day minimum plus some kind of mental stimulation.

Our dog sleeps in a crate but with the door open. He goes between it and random spots on the floor. I would love him to sleep on the bed, and he used to, but he was starting to get territorial over it, so he was hoofed off (much to his consternation). Used to it now (but I still go out and sleep next to him sometimes.)

As you are taking early retirement, I'd go for it. Especially as you're used to high energy dogs since you've had a spaniel.

HopelessSemantics Thu 13-Aug-20 12:37:18

Whippets are lovely too!

KnobChops Thu 13-Aug-20 12:39:56

HopelessSemantics

They're gorgeous dogs, OP. Definitely high energy, two hours a day minimum plus some kind of mental stimulation.

Our dog sleeps in a crate but with the door open. He goes between it and random spots on the floor. I would love him to sleep on the bed, and he used to, but he was starting to get territorial over it, so he was hoofed off (much to his consternation). Used to it now (but I still go out and sleep next to him sometimes.)

As you are taking early retirement, I'd go for it. Especially as you're used to high energy dogs since you've had a spaniel.

Thank you. Really helpful.

The cocker could walk and walk and walk. I guess the only thing is they’re quite a bit smaller. I worry that I wouldn’t sufficiently wear out a bigger energetic dog. Hmm, need to have a think...

OP’s posts: |
KnobChops Thu 13-Aug-20 12:40:34

We live near the forest so poor recall might be an issue, unless I keep them on lead.

OP’s posts: |
tabulahrasa Thu 13-Aug-20 13:06:55

“Thanks everyone - happy to do a daily brush. The running miles and miles bit worries me a little as was thinking more 2 x 1 hour walks a day. We have a good sized garden.”

So I find sometimes opinion on this varies a bit, but... I wouldn’t be looking at high energy active breeds if all I wanted to do was two not particularly long walks a day tbh.

That’s active by human standards, not dog standards.

That doesn’t necessarily mean hours more walking, but it does mean time doing other things to keep an active dog busy...

GrumpyMiddleAgedWoman Thu 13-Aug-20 13:46:15

Setters are lovely dogs, stunning to look at and sociable with people.

Just be aware that red setters are very prone to spay incontinence, as are Dobes. With either breed, I would personally either keep a bitch intact, or at least delay spaying until she was 3-ish.

Recall is very much what you make it. It's harder with some breeds than with others and a lot of gundog breeds have considerable prey drive and will follow their noses so you really have to get on top of it when they're young and stay there (one of mine is currently in recall bootcamp grin). It must be possible with setters, or they wouldn't be worked.

Also mental stimulation will wear a dog out more than physical exercise. I'm a massive fan of the long stay, because the mental exercise of NOT moving brings the mania of a young working-line dog down a good few notches.

fivedogstofeed Thu 13-Aug-20 13:50:41

We live near the forest so poor recall might be an issue, unless I keep them on lead

Honestly, you can't get a setter and not let it off the lead. Setters are programmed to run in huge circles over a big area and if they're not allowed to do this they are miserable. This is where the idea that they are bonkers comes in, when IMO they're actually very misunderstood. A well exercised setter will lie around the house like a cat for the rest of the day.
They're gundogs, so no reason why they can't learn recall with a bit off effort.
IME setters and cats are not a great combination, though there can be exceptions. I've fostered quite a few and wouldn't have trusted any of them with a cat.

BarkingHat Thu 13-Aug-20 13:50:46

We had a rescue one when I was a kid, beautiful but loopy. Mental stimulation would be important, not that they are smart, they aren’t. But it keeps any dog occupied!

Greywind1523 Thu 13-Aug-20 13:51:01

How about a Standard Poodle or a Pointer/Vizsla? Possibly slightly less crazy than a Setter?

PickAChew Thu 13-Aug-20 14:02:59

My parents' setters all got on well with cats though our first, a rescue, always wanted to mother them. She was a bit of a nutter, anyhow. She had a particular taste for wasps and bees and nothing would stop her going back for more after pulling faces while chewing the first one. She and the cat were a bit of a food stealing double act. She'd open doors and bins and the cat would climb up high and knock things down and. Between them, they'd devour their spoils.

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