Talk

Advanced search

Dog scratched baby by mistake

(35 Posts)
crispysausagerolls Fri 21-Jun-19 17:55:11

Our working cocker (3) is a complete angel with our baby (1), and they love each other very much. I never leave them alone together but the problem is DS and spaniel play together (passing a toy back and forth etc) and chase each other round, and it’s not possible/fair to stop this. However today my dog scratched DS on his face whilst playfully pawing him. It wasn’t a deep scratch and DS didn’t cry (or seem to notice) but it was SO close to his eye and I am now terrified and don’t know what to do.

OP’s posts: |
Bookworm4 Fri 21-Jun-19 17:57:51

Stop panicking, the scratch was an accident. I would teach your DS to play calmly with the dog, running around chasing is no doubt making your dog very excited, of course it’s possible to control what interaction they have.

BiteyShark Fri 21-Jun-19 17:58:50

You need to keep them separate unless you can actively supervise.

Of course things like this are going to happen if you let effectively two babies play together, one of those having sharp teeth and nails and can jump.

OverFedStanley Fri 21-Jun-19 18:00:40

chase each other round, and it’s not possible/fair to stop this.

You have to stop this as a toddler and a dog chasing is a really really really bad idea.

Use stairgates to separate them if they start chasing each other, distract both the dog and the baby is chasing starts

Thursday452poh Fri 21-Jun-19 18:02:04

You need to stop them playing together, disaster waiting to happen.

yellowblueorange Fri 21-Jun-19 18:11:15

I think the young age of both is the problem. My toddler and cocker spaniel play together fine but the dog is quite a bit older at 10 years old. (He's still crazy because he's a spaniel but significantly less crazy than he was at 3 years old!)

Personally I wouldn't stop them playing but I might change the games so his paws aren't at a level where he can hurt with scratches.

crispysausagerolls Fri 21-Jun-19 18:35:28

Please explain how I can stop them? The only solution is to keep them in separate rooms at all times, which would mean our dog being stuck in the kitchen all day as I’m not leaving a 1 year old alone in a room. This is cruel and our dog would just bark.

I am actively supervising but its very hard. i remove the toy from DS and the dog runs and gets another one and brings it.

OP’s posts: |
crispysausagerolls Fri 21-Jun-19 18:36:38

You need to stop them playing together, disaster waiting to happen.

Please give me ideas of how to stop them!

OP’s posts: |
BiteyShark Fri 21-Jun-19 18:40:08

Get a big dog play pen. Put dog in playpen when you need to or the other way round. When supervising make sure no running about and if dog or child gets over excited separate to calm them down.

I am not sure what you are asking really as you say you can't stop them. What do you want to do?

crispysausagerolls Fri 21-Jun-19 18:40:43

I also don’t think a stairgate would be a good idea because they would both just be trying to touch each other through it and our spaniel would feel shut out and upset.

I am really panicking. Our spaniel is a very important part of our family but I am worried I cannot keep our son safe/can’t think of any solutions where both will be happy and safe

OP’s posts: |
crispysausagerolls Fri 21-Jun-19 18:42:01

I wanted to know what people do with their dogs!

Like a playpen - I see what you are saying but my spaniel would just go apeshit and bark constantly if in one. I suppose I can just try removing all toys from them both whenever they try to play, and shutting him in the kitchen to bark: what do other people do in this situation?

OP’s posts: |
BertieBotts Fri 21-Jun-19 18:42:05

Link at the end of this article about how to "de-magnetise" your toddler from the dog. I'm linking to this one first because the other doesn't make a lot of sense without this context.

www.dogsandbabieslearning.com/2011/01/24/mamas-dont-let-your-babies-get-magnetized-to-dogs/

BiteyShark Fri 21-Jun-19 18:42:52

Do you want someone to say you should rehome because you seem very negative to any suggestions of keeping them separate unless you can actively supervise?

Babymamamama Fri 21-Jun-19 18:43:15

I think you’ve answered your own question OP. You can’t keep them safe as you say. They are playing too closely together. Dogs shouldn’t be encouraged to play with young children. Training is key here.

crispysausagerolls Fri 21-Jun-19 18:45:43

Ffs Biteyshark back off. I am just upset and I want to know if people had any suggestions. Eg the lady who posted an article. I have to be realistic about whcih solutions might work - shutting my active spaniel in a playpen won’t. Removing and training 24/7 might.

OP’s posts: |
Lordamighty Fri 21-Jun-19 18:47:18

our spaniel would feel shut out and upset
You are prioritising the feelings of your dog over the safety of your 1 year old child.

BiteyShark Fri 21-Jun-19 18:48:40

* - I see what you are saying but my spaniel would just go apeshit and bark constantly if in one*

Feed him treats so he gets a good association with it. Give him a stuffed kong to occupy himself.

I also don’t think a stairgate would be a good idea because they would both just be trying to touch each other through it and our spaniel would feel shut out and upset.

Keep your baby away from the gate. Use a combination of two or a playpen and gate. Interact with both separately so both get your attention. A gate would stop the dog jumping up and both getting each other over excited.

BiteyShark Fri 21-Jun-19 18:50:22

I am trying to help but you discounted each suggestion that was made by everyone to separate to keep both of them safe when you couldn't actually be supervising.

NoSquirrels Fri 21-Jun-19 18:50:58

the problem is DS and spaniel play together (passing a toy back and forth etc) and chase each other round, and it’s not possible/fair to stop this.

You do have to stop this - it’s an accident waiting to happen as you’ve unfortunately discovered.

Can you get a trainer in to work with you and see the behaviour?

You will need to be very consistent both with your dog and your DS.

You need to teach a new game that is less boisterous.

thesnapandfartisinfallible Fri 21-Jun-19 18:51:59

I think it's a complete overreaction tbh. The scratch was an accident. Your child could be playing with a toy and do exactly the same to himself, you can make accidents less likely but never remove the risk. If they get on well just let them play.

crispysausagerolls Fri 21-Jun-19 18:52:23

bertie

Thank you this is very interesting. I’ve made the mistake of letting them get too close to encourage a bond

OP’s posts: |
Topseyt Fri 21-Jun-19 18:54:53

This will go too far one day. You must stop them playing like that.

Teach DS to throw a dog toy for the dog to retrieve. Stuff like that. Involve him in an age appropriate way in things that will gradually train the dog to behave as you would wish. Train dog to go to it's basket after a decent game or walk. Ensure that DS does NOT go and disturb dog at that point. Do something with DS like reading a story etc.

You were lucky this time, but you do need to keep a lid on this rough play or DS could get injured. So could the dog, come to that.

Many years ago now I had a two year old daughter and an eight week old mad furball of a labrador puppy. It is hard. It is very trying. I had no choice though.

Nesssie Fri 21-Jun-19 18:55:58

Honestly, I don’t think you need to do anything. Accidents happen. If your children scratched himself on the table would you make drastic life changes?
Supervise them at all times and stop the play when it gets too out of control. Otherwise it sounds like your dog and child get on fine and this was an accident.

Nesssie Fri 21-Jun-19 18:57:40

I don’t see what you are describing as rough play or the child annoying the dog. If the dog is bringing the toy to the child and happily playing then no problem.

YouKidsKeepMeYoung Fri 21-Jun-19 18:59:34

Nail covers for dogs. You glue them on.

www.softpaws.com/soft-paws-dogs/

Join the discussion

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.

Join Mumsnet

Already have a Mumsnet account? Log in