Any tips for leaving a puppy alone?

(8 Posts)
LittleLongDog Fri 14-Dec-18 12:03:32

I’ve had my puppy less than a week and so far he hasn’t had to be left alone in the house...

We’ve done plenty of leaving him behind a stair gate while we get on and he sleeps alone at night (in a crate but not shut in) - we ignore him when he’s noisey and only return when he’s quiet.

I know not to leave him for more than an hour per his month (I don’t think I could leave him longer anyway as he’d need a wee).

He has a safe area in the kitchen, which his bed (inside crate) is also in.

I guess what I’m asking is; do I literally just leave? Or are there any steps I’ve missed?

He’ll cry won’t he? Will the neighbours hate me?

OP’s posts: |
BiteyShark Fri 14-Dec-18 12:09:35

I would definitely recommend buying a cheap IP camera that streams to your phone. I can hear and see my dog at all times when I am out as I can move the camera about.

I would then start to go in and out of the house for a few minutes and act as if nothing happened and then gradually build that time up (using the camera to see how your puppy reacts when you leave).

p.s. I love watching mine listen for us coming back as he then runs about trying to find us a present to greet us with.

Lauren5071 Fri 14-Dec-18 12:38:08

With mine I started gradually leaving my pup on his own. Sat outside the front door for one minute increasing to two, then three and so on. This meant I could gauge his reaction and keep an eye out for pining etc. Incidentally he wasn’t phased at all by being left, a quick peek through the window showed that he was just flopped in his bed. He’s not a yappy breed though. A good friend of mine has a miniature snauczer (sp?) and he goes totally beserk when he’s left alone and always has.

adaline Fri 14-Dec-18 14:01:05

The one thing I've learnt is not to make a big fuss of him when you go, don't go and fuss him and say goodbye, just go out as normal. You could leave him with a frozen kong or a safe chew to keep him busy if you wanted, and then just go out.

I second leaving a camera - mine barks a bit when we leave (only for a minute or so) and then settles and he's fine after that. He used to get himself really worked up though so we've had to work up to leaving him. He's 10 months now and I can only just leave him for an hour or so - we always leave him with a stuffed kong or chew to keep him occupied as well.

StarlightIntheNight Fri 14-Dec-18 14:25:15

Give your dog something nice to chew on, like a kong filled w something yummy or dog chew. This will keep them happy and occupied. I never had a problem leaving my dog, but early on I would make sure she has something nice to occupy her.

Whoseranium Fri 14-Dec-18 15:58:42

You need to start small and build up very gradually, at the puppy's own pace. Teaching them to be left shouldn't ever involve them crying, it's putting them in situations where they cry (often caused by moving too fast and expecting too much too soon) which teaches them that being left is something they should be distressed about.

The FB group Dog Training Advice and Support has some excellent guides in their 'Files' section on both crate training (which encompasses being left) and

I'd highly recommend giving these two a read:

Crate Training - Step By Step Guide to a Distress Free, Force Free Crate Trained Dog or Pup

Puppies and Time...

It's also well worth joining that group if you're on FB. This is a really common question that gets asked and there are some excellent trainers and behaviourists who have posted explaining things in even more depth.

LittleLongDog Fri 14-Dec-18 20:27:04

Thanks all. Love the idea of a camera. I need to be brave and leave him for a bit longer I think!

OP’s posts: |

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LadyLuna16 Fri 14-Dec-18 23:11:21

I downloaded an app called Alfred. You need a phone to wave at home to act as the camera and then you can see what she is doing while you’re out.

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