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The dog won't stop humping DD

(16 Posts)
JesusDontWantMeForASunbeam Tue 03-Jan-17 13:34:39

Please help before I lose my mind. Rescued DDog on New Year's Day. He's about 18 months old- staffy/ Rhodesian ridgeback cross. He was fine yesterday. He humped my mum a bit but she has a bitch so thought it was the smell.

He hasn't left DD (6) alone today. I've been pulling him away and saying a firm no but it's not working. I'm not sure why it's only her but she's quite shrill so maybe he thinks it's a game?

He hasn't been 'done' yet. The shelter said to give him a few weeks to settle in but maybe I need to book him in sooner rather than later?

DD can't even stroke him today as he just climbs on her. He's having 3 walks a day so I don't think it's a lack of exercise.

Would a spray device help? I'm at my wits end. He's a lovely dog apart from this and I want everyone to be happy!

TrionicLettuce Tue 03-Jan-17 14:17:50

Humping isn't necessarily a sexual behaviour, it can also be caused by either excitement or stress as well. As such neutering won't necessarily help (I've got three neutered boys who all have a bit of a hump on occasion when they get too giddy) so I wouldn't rush into getting him done any sooner than planned.

Rather than telling him off I'd work on teaching him a positive interruptor instead. There's a great video on how to do this here. Obviously the results won't be instant so for now I'd manage the behaviour by keeping him on a house line so you can keep him away from your DD more easily.

Definitely don't use anything like a spray collar, pet corrector or anything like that. If he's just overly excited the spray could just wind him up even more and if he's anxious you run the risk of making him fearful. There's also a real danger he could start to associate the unpleasantness of the spray with your DD which you definitely do not want.

As well as the positive interruptor I'd start working on teaching him to be calm in the house. This isn't always something that comes naturally to some dogs but you absolutely can teach them how to relax when they're at home. The same trainer in the above video has an excellent series of videos called Capturing Calmness which covers teaching an "off switch". The first video in the series is here.

JesusDontWantMeForASunbeam Tue 03-Jan-17 16:25:09

Thanks. I'll give the advice on the video a go. It's literally every minute or 2 he starts doing it again. He seems very unsettled so I'm hoping it's him reacting to a new home and environment.

OliviaBenson Tue 03-Jan-17 19:46:12

Ours did this, it was because he was unsettled and it was something that felt nice.

It's very early days yet. I second those videos. Please don't use any of the negative training techniques, they can do untold damage.

OrangeSquashTallGlass Tue 03-Jan-17 19:48:58

Have you tried a plug in adaptil to see if that helps him feel calmer? (Disclaimer, I don't have a dog - I saw it advertised on TV! grin)

Shriek Tue 03-Jan-17 20:27:55

A lot of young/excitable bitches and dogs will do this especially around the excitability of children and due to stress amd just because a pleasant feelimg that gives reassurance. Presumably he is completely over-powering dd?
Dd needs to Learn a way of mamaging this for herself too or she could become very fearful. Do you have backp from the rescue who coild work with you all?

JesusDontWantMeForASunbeam Wed 04-Jan-17 07:57:50

DD isn't knocked to the floor or anything. He'll jump on her on the sofa or if she's laying down, sitting down etc. He didn't do it last night when DP was home and we were all in the same room. Once DP left the room he did it.

JesusDontWantMeForASunbeam Thu 05-Jan-17 17:25:12

He's really starting to hurt DD. None of the techniques are making a dent of a difference. In the evenings when she's in bed or DP is home he's a lovely dog. The rest of the time I actually hate him and could cry.

TrionicLettuce Thu 05-Jan-17 17:42:33

Have you tried keeping him on a lead or otherwise keeping him separate so he can't physically get to her?

The more he practises a behaviour the more ingrained it will become so as well as the training you need to prevent the behaviour happening as much as possible.

JesusDontWantMeForASunbeam Thu 05-Jan-17 18:32:07

I haven't tried keeping him on a lead but it's worth a shot. There's nowhere I can contain him. He's big enough to jump stair gates and opens doors angry

He was lying in wait for her to get changed in the bathroom earlier, whining until she came out and he jumped on her again. Then when I wrestled him off he stuck his nose in her laundry basket for 10 minutes. DP is home now and he hasn't gone near her.

Amandahugandkisses Thu 05-Jan-17 18:37:15

I'm sorry but that is really awful for your DD. She must be terrified he sounds obsessed with her.

cherrycrumblecustard Thu 05-Jan-17 18:38:22

I'd just get him done, tbh.

luckylavender Thu 05-Jan-17 21:03:57

He's not the right dog for you. You have to put DD first.

mumonashoestring Thu 05-Jan-17 21:12:39

The fact that he's behaving differently when your DP is at home tells me this is a dominance behaviour - he won't try to assert his place in the 'pack' whilst your DP is there because he recognises him as the leader, he's all about trying to please when he's around.

Neutering will help but there are also some training/handling techniques that can help - a good dog trainer will be able to give you pointers but the simplest would be for you to hold him by the scruff of his neck every time the humping starts and then stand straddling his back. Not sitting on him - you're not trying to pin him down, just point out to him that he's not the boss. Putting yourself in a position of dominance points out to him that he's not the second in the pack structure.

parklives Sun 15-Jan-17 19:36:35

I agree with pp. You need to show that it's not only your dp that is the boss of the dog, all of you are.
Do you have a crate so your dd can get a break from him?

TrionicLettuce Sun 15-Jan-17 19:58:11

Jesus please don't get into any kind of "dominance" based training with your dog, particularly if it involves manhandling him. Have a read of any of the articles on this page (particularly 'The Truth About Humping' as it's very relevant for your situation) if you're tempted.

This is also worth a read. Although it's actually about general puppy raising you can apply all those points to this situation as well. Prevent him from performing the behaviour (whether by separating him and your DD completely or keeping him on lead when she's around), reward him as soon as he's in proximity with DD and isn't doing it, teach the positive interruptor for occasions when he does do it.

Have you been in touch with the rescue about this? They may have a behaviourist they work with who would be able to come and help. If not then you could look at getting a referral to a behaviourist. The best way to find one is through a reputable organisation such as the APBC or CAPBT.

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