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new puppy logistics - some questions

(10 Posts)
thewalrus Mon 04-Jul-16 10:35:02

Hi everyone,
Our puppy was born last week and we'll be picking her up towards the end of August. To say I'm excited is an understatement (though suspect it'll be nothing to how the kids react when they find out). Am reading loads and getting my house in order, but I have a couple of questions (and maybe a tendency to overthink things!):

1. Main question - how does it actually work in the bit where the puppy can't go on the ground cos it hasn't been vaccinated but you're trying to socialise it. I get the idea that you can and should carry her around so she sees new things etc, but what about going to the loo? How long is it realistic to carry your puppy around for? (Eg if I was to take her to do a bit of shopping and have a coffee outside a café in town that might take an hour - am I going to get weed on?) Or do you just end up popping them briefly on the ground in practice?
2. When should I register with the vet - will they think I'm mad if I get in touch when I won't actually have a puppy for weeks yet? Ditto puppy classes.
3. How did you find it actually worked introducing your puppy to your kids' friends? My own kids (9 and 7) are reasonably dog savvy, and will definitely be able to take the nipping etc in their stride for the greater good. But my SIL will be distinctly unimpressed if her kids get nipped in the course of interacting with the puppy, and obviously I don't want to put them off. I know what to say to children about how to interact with a puppy, I just don't know what to do if they don't do it!
Thanks for reading, and thanks for any advice - did I mention I'm quite excited!

DiamondInTheRuff Mon 04-Jul-16 11:18:04

Congratulations! The first, and most important thing to remember is that new puppy photos are OBLIGATORY as soon as you bring pup home!

1) It's a bit of a juggling act, TBH. Yes, you may get weed on. I got weed on quite a lot when we had a puppy. Ultimately you have to make a decision - we decided that we would allow DDog to socialise with other dogs that we knew were vaccinated, in their gardens or ours. My Step brother decided to go down the "absolutely no contact with any dog at all" route. When Our dog was very young he was happy to be carried everywhere, but about a week before he was clear of his vaccinations he just screamed if you picked him up because he wanted to go and sniff around. Hard work!

2) I wouldn't have thought there'd be a problem with getting registered with a vet, places generally aren't limited, so no rush. However there's no harm in touching base and finding out about health care plans etc if you think you might be interested. With training classes I'd get your name down ASAP. There's only one decent puppy trainer around here and she has an insanely long waiting list. Look for somebody offering positive reinforcement / clicker training. Steer clear of anybody spouting dominance / pack theory.

3) Well, we didn't have DCs when we got our pup, and have only had rescues since then. Most of our friends are fairly clued up as they are dog people themselves. Although I had to have stern words with one at the weekend when he hit our new rescue. With children, I'd be tempted to keep separate as much as possible really - especially if you know parents will complain. Bare in mind sharp teeth can rip clothing, too, so you might find yourself being asked to pay for replacements!

thewalrus Mon 04-Jul-16 14:00:47

Thank you - that's all really helpful. And there will definitely be photos!

littlemissneela Mon 04-Jul-16 14:20:56

1. Main question - how does it actually work in the bit where the puppy can't go on the ground cos it hasn't been vaccinated but you're trying to socialise it. I get the idea that you can and should carry her around so she sees new things etc, but what about going to the loo? How long is it realistic to carry your puppy around for? (Eg if I was to take her to do a bit of shopping and have a coffee outside a café in town that might take an hour - am I going to get weed on?) Or do you just end up popping them briefly on the ground in practice? You can let your puppy on the ground in your own back garden. You just need to be careful in public places. Carry puppy as much as you can so they get used to roads noises and meet lots of different people. Be prepared for your usual 10 min stroll to take at least three times as long due to people wanting to come and say hello

2. When should I register with the vet - will they think I'm mad if I get in touch when I won't actually have a puppy for weeks yet? Ditto puppy classes. I didn't register mine with a vet until we brought her home, but I took her in for a vet check the day after we got her, and registered her then. I am sure you can go and see your chosen vet now, and see what they suggest.

3. How did you find it actually worked introducing your puppy to your kids' friends? My own kids (9 and 7) are reasonably dog savvy, and will definitely be able to take the nipping etc in their stride for the greater good. But my SIL will be distinctly unimpressed if her kids get nipped in the course of interacting with the puppy, and obviously I don't want to put them off. I know what to say to children about how to interact with a puppy, I just don't know what to do if they don't do it! Explain to all kids, and adults, and esp if you are crate training, that when puppy goes in their bed, you leave them alone. Its their safe space, free from all hassle. As for nipping, it will happen, but its not malicious its just play. Some puppies nip more than others. Mine is a cocker spaniel and she was a right nipper! She escially loved toes, and taking peoples socks off! You can do a high pitched yelp when they nip, and that should stop. If that doesn't work, you can either leave the room, or put them out of the room for a min or so, as they don't lilke being excluded.

The main thing is enjoy your new addition. They are small for such a short time, like babies, but are so much fun smile

thewalrus Tue 05-Jul-16 13:57:31

Thank you, Neela, that's helpful.

We will definitely be crate training - we have a fairly hectic household, so I want the puppy to have its own safe space. I guess that will help if there are any problems with overenthusiastic kids or puppy! I'm from a family of dog lovers, but my DHs family (who are the ones who live nearby) aren't keen at all. It's going to be hard for them to get used to us having a dog around the place, and I want to do my best to make it a positive experience if I can.

MaitlandGirl Tue 05-Jul-16 14:04:27

I've got toy breed dogs and have carried them in a baby sling (ring sling style) with a hand towel folded up underneath them in case of accidents.

It worked really well with the small dogs and meant I could carry them around for months until they were able to cope with longer walks and were less likely to be trodden on!

TheGiantSausage Fri 08-Jul-16 16:16:14

The only thing I'd suggest is register with the vet as early as possible, mine was still registered at the rescue but she got ill and the rescue wasn't open out of hours, I didn't know what to do! It was very manageable to be fair, the local vet saw us and registered there and then but it was a stress and panic I could have done without.

What breed is the pup?

Shriek Fri 08-Jul-16 19:57:49

good to have an open house event with children/adults/other [friendly well socialised dogs] and continue to invite round so dpup gets very used to the routine of having to be gracious and waiting whilst visitors get in through the door and get settled before being allowed to greet!

also, i would only take dpup to places where i could be fairly brief (like school run where lots of interest from all angles and ages), and local fetes, etc, but still i got wee'd on!

If it will help you to call and register and chat with the vet(s) so you can discover what local reception and services are like, and what they offer for dppups.

Its great to hear of someone planning such important and precious arrival so well smile

... and... CONGRATULATIONS on such exciting event.

Shriek Fri 08-Jul-16 20:00:46

As regards introducing to children, select carefully who you invite to your gathering and forewarn, also giving them tips on how to deal with chewing/biting, but put down plenty of distractions and make sure dpup doesn't get too tired when will naturally get more snappy, or too over-whelmed at one time.

also walking the streets regularly, like school run [walk] will familiarise with traffic sounds and lots of passerbys and street noises.

thewalrus Sun 10-Jul-16 07:39:41

Thank you, lots of good advice there. Puppy is a mini schnauzer, so should be small enough to carry around in a sling for school run etc. Will definitely be inviting some well chosen friends over to meet her too, will suit everyone as kids' style will be slightly cramped by having to be at home so much for the last bit of the summer holidays!

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