Talk

Advanced search

I'm more confused than ever (after the ***poo thread)

(23 Posts)
hillyhilly Thu 26-May-16 20:08:53

I have school aged children and a cat, I don't work and I want a dog that we can be relaxed with - (ie not aggressive or snappy or inclined to chase the cat). I want to walk the dog off the lead in the countryside and on the lead twice per day so dog will get around 1.5 hours/day minimum.
The longer I spend trying to decide, the more people I talk to, the more confused I end up!
I have posted before as I would dearly like to adopt an adult lurcher but so many people think it's a bad idea that I'm not sure I'll ever find the non chasing, known history, non aggressive one that I need.
I would be happy to rescue in principle but I'm not willing to have a staffy and am nervous of not knowing a dogs history.
I do think that cross breeds with poodle in could be perfect for us but am wary of puppy farming and the whole designer "it's a watsit-poo" thing - I can't adopt until September but am getting more and more confused as time goes on!
Tel me about your family dogs please, I need the good news stories, not the raised eyebrows and sucked in teeth.,

tabulahrasa Thu 26-May-16 22:47:55

If you've read that thread, you'll know the ins and outs of poodle crosses...

But if a poodle cross would suit you, why not a poodle?

SeemsLegit Thu 26-May-16 22:50:10

Poodles are extremely intelligent dogs. What about a non racing greyhound if you like lurchers?

You can rescue cross breeds if that's what you want to do

Bubble2bubble Fri 27-May-16 08:04:11

I strongly believe that you can find a rescue dog, though it may take time and effort ( whereas it is sadly very easy to go out and buy a puppy today ).

The Doodle Trust could be a good place for you to look, or there is lot of information here

Its been said before, but always worth repeating - many dogs end up in rescue and their history is known, and they are there because of a family illness/death/marriage breakup or other good reason.
Good rescues which use foster homes will give an honest assessment of the dog, which often includes their attitude to kids and cats.

AlcoChocs Fri 27-May-16 08:54:56

Maybe stop thinking about breeds and just look at individual dogs?
There are loads of gorgeous mongrels in rescue and if they're fostered you'll be able to get a lot of info about them before committing.

SleepForTheWeak Fri 27-May-16 08:55:35

We have an adult lurcher that we rescued - she's honesty the best dog in the world. She was fairly young when we got her and we had no history on her as she was a stray.

There were teething issue at first, of course. We let her off the lead in the park everyday, she will chase birds etc but that's just her nature and gives her a good run. She has caught a couple rabbits before, and she's interested in cats but hasn't chased one and gets on fine with my parents cat.

She is so laid back and gentle and is so patient with my toddler.

How that helps

SleepForTheWeak Fri 27-May-16 08:57:24

We have an adult lurcher that we rescued - she's honesty the best dog in the world. She was fairly young when we got her and we had no history on her as she was a stray.

There were teething issue at first, of course. We let her off the lead in the park everyday, she will chase birds etc but that's just her nature and gives her a good run. She has caught a couple rabbits before, and she's interested in cats but hasn't chased one and gets on fine with my parents cat.

She is so laid back and gentle and is so patient with my toddler.

How that helps

SleepForTheWeak Fri 27-May-16 09:02:58

*Hope that helps

Also, check it lozzas lurchers on fb. She looks after them in her own home so knows the dogs really well, and cat tests them (no cats harmed in the process!!!)

needastrongone Fri 27-May-16 09:05:09

What about a cocker spaniel? Even my working type is fine with 1.5 hours of walking a day, but a show type definitely would. They are honestly such a family friendly breed. Mine is the most gentle, quiet, placid sweet soul you could imagine.

I have a springer too, but he's harder work, the cocker is pretty much your ideal first dog.

Lonecatwithkitten Fri 27-May-16 12:06:10

Pure poodles tick every box on your list they were breed as working dogs and love walks. Bright keen to please, sociable dogs who tend to love cats and people.

LilaTheTiger Fri 27-May-16 12:15:52

Lurchers are the best dogs in the world. There's no contest. Mine lives happily with cats, ducks and chickens and I've had him as a rescue since he was 10mths (he's nearly 8 now).

Have you tried lurcher link rescue? On Facebook or the Web if you don't have it.

mollie123 Fri 27-May-16 16:25:19

I have posted before as I would dearly like to adopt an adult lurcher but so many people think it's a bad idea that I'm not sure I'll ever find the non chasing, known history, non aggressive one that I need.
Op rest assured Lurchers (a crossbreed not a designer dog (except they are designed to hunt)) is not necessarily prey-driven and certainly not aggressive hmm
as many pointy hound owners on here will tell you they are the most delightful, gentle, quiet, lazy hounds ever smile

PetraStrorm Fri 27-May-16 16:31:52

I was going to say lurcher or cat-safe greyhound too. My ex-racer greyhound isn't cat safe yet, and sometimes still goes into shutdown race mode when she sees distant moving furry things, so can't be off lead, but in every other way she's the perfect gentle, sociable, quiet, lovely family dog. Sleeps a lot but is always up for a walk. Great with the kids (my youngest is 6)

As others have said, a cat-safe lurcher or non-racing greyhound might be perfect for you.

Scuttlebutter Fri 27-May-16 19:48:22

We have greyhounds plus an adorable little lurcher from EGLR(pic attached). She's small, round, and the most affectionate, gentle little dog you could ever imagine. She is let off lead regularly and I do training with her - Rally and we actually have our KC Bronze test next week which I am expecting her to sail through.

And have you been recently to a park and seen the level of recall among the non-sighthounds? Around 80% of them have zero recall. I'm not saying that's good but I think it's possible as a sighthound owner to actually get very hung up on this and paradoxically I'd say our recall is now pretty reliable as we spend so much time and effort working on it.

EGLR are a fantastic rescue who have some gorgeous family friendly dogs in and all their dogs are fostered before rehoming so you will get a very accurate and detailed picture of their behaviour/suitability before they come to you. I'd recommend them wholeheartedly.

likealaugh Fri 27-May-16 21:43:32

I have a cockapoo who is just perfect . He is gentle but playful. Enjoys walks but is happy with 3 short ones or two longer . Trains easily and enjoys interaction. Fun, silly and gets over excited at times. Ask away... And for those who don't like or agree with these so called designer dogs ....bog off !

likealaugh Fri 27-May-16 21:50:50

And forgot to mention he doesn't shed any hair.... Woop woop! One of the reasons I choose This breed ....aren't I awful , spending money on something I want rather than what people think I should get grin

taptonaria27 Fri 27-May-16 22:43:31

Thanks all, again I have been hugely reassured by talking to Pip at EGLR today that the dog we need/ want is not an impossible dream. Their system of fostering and really getting to know the dogs before matching them with a family sounds spot on

Scuttlebutter Fri 27-May-16 23:37:32

I'm so pleased to hear this, OP. Pip is immensely knowledgeable and has a fantastic team of foster homes. You will be in very safe hands, and there's quite a few Mnetters who are EGLR adopters - welcome to our club. smile

mollie123 Sat 28-May-16 06:57:23

like that was a bit rude on a very good-natured thread where we all were trying to chat amicably with the OP hmm

SharingMichelle Sat 28-May-16 07:02:49

The thing is OP, you have a lot of criteria for how you want your dog to behave, but literally no dog behaves perfectly by magic. You get out what you put in. The dog you have in mind sounds wonderful, and you will need to be very commited to teach it to be that way. Some breeds can be generally easier to teach than others, but there are no guarantees.

likealaugh Sat 28-May-16 08:26:39

Sorry my point was , YOU choose . You have to put your heart and soul into YOUR dog to make it work . It's bloody hard work at times but worth it. I should imagine if you choose a breed you've researched and you put the hard work in , it'll all work out fine.
As others have said , no breed is perfect but do your best , love it lots , set boundaries and you'll end up with a new family member ( maybe even a new 'favourite ' family member wink

LilaTheTiger Sat 28-May-16 14:19:22

Absolutely agree with likealaugh. My lurcher boy is a dream, and everyone falls in love with him and tells me how easy and great he is, I know! And it's because I put so much work in with him. We did weekly puppy classes, which were initially incredibly embarrassing because he had Jo idea how to behave and LOTS of practice and bonding exercises every day. Once we were properly bonded everything became easier, and now he has almost perfect the recall and I swear understands every word I say smile.

Only some of that is down to his good, sweet nature. The rest of it is training.

CMOTDibbler Sat 28-May-16 17:53:41

I'm so glad you had a good talk with Pip, they try so hard to make sure that they know about their dogs.
My two lurchers have had a lovely day, and ddog1 spent a considerable length of time lying on his back in the park while random small children came to stroke him. He's now snoring on the deck while the chickens wander around him!

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now