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My dog is a bit naughty

(6 Posts)
AlphaBravoHenryFoxtons Mon 29-Jun-15 11:29:11

She's lovely and we adore her. She's gorgeous natured and smart. But I've realised we've let her get a bit naughty and I'm not sure entirely how to go about correcting it.

She is a nearly 9 months old Cockerpoo.

She still jumps up at people in a waggy enthusiastic way. She doesn't jump up at me. But she does at others.
She barks at next door's cat who sits on top of the fence looking haughtily down his nose at her.
She begs at the table when we're eating. (Unfortunately DS3 kept sneaking her titbits but I have been super vigilant about him not doing this). But she hangs around the table expecting something and sometimes jumps up. hmm
She runs off with stuff like socks and bits of Lego and thinks it's a marvellous game.
If we take the stairgate away she shoots upstairs and we don't want a dog that goes upstairs as we have cream carpets.
She jumps on the furniture. I allow her onto the sofa at night in the little sitting room and I see we've created confusion for her as she thinks all sofas are fair game.

Otherwise she's magic. Her recall is excellent. She sits, lies down, gives a paw and rolls on demand. She walks beautifully on the lead. Is fully housetrained. Sleeps well. Is gentle and playful with the children. Hardly ever barks (except when next door's cat is sitting on the high fence). Is very good with other dogs. But I think she thinks she's a human being.

We did a lot of dog training classes but her behaviour is less than perfect.

It's not her is it? It's us?

Any ideas as to how to correct these things.

foolonthehill Mon 29-Jun-15 11:40:44

You have an intelligent, enthusiastic dog.....you can train her and yes it is (nearly) always we humans who make it difficult...not the dog.

Dog gets tit bits from the table...dog will beg. Solution no food ever from the table, only ever in her bowl or from hand when training. You may have to put her in her bed whilst you eat, or outside, or crate as her optimism will get the better of the new rules and you won;t be concentrating whilst you look after your family.

The running is fun for her...she steals to get attention and you running after her. teach a good "drop" and give her frequent chase plays with her ball/frizbee/rope. however you are unlikely to stop her being a opportunist with games or table scraps!

teach a bark to command and you may find she barks less at the cat...however as cat is taunting her on her turf I am not surewhether that will work. You could try a water pistol to get the cat off the fence! (mean)

be consistent...either she is allowed on furniture or not. And remember rules only apply when you are there to enforce in your dog's mind...so don;t leave her with access to sofas when you can;t correct her.

Ditto stairs.

good luck. it's exhausting but worth it!

IME it's harder to get the other humans in the house to work with this than the dog!

FlumptyDumpty Mon 29-Jun-15 11:52:13

She sounds delightful! IME she is doing very well for a puppy of not quite 9 months, but fool's advice is very sage for further training and development. Completely agree that training the humans is the most crucial - and hardest - bit!

Any piccies?!

DunelmDoris Mon 29-Jun-15 20:37:53

She's not naughty smile she actually sounds really well trained for her age.

She's doing what all dogs would do in her shoes - being opportunistic. If you don't want her upstairs or on furniture then prevent her accessing these places. Don't feed her at the table - put her to her bed with a chew or Kong instead. Make sure any visitors ask her to sit before fussing her so she learns to keep her feet on the ground - a lead hanging by the front door can come in handy. And Google "doggy zen" for an easy way to train a reliable leave it smile

AlphaBravoHenryFoxtons Tue 21-Jul-15 23:07:36

Thanks for your encouraging advice. I've worked really hard with her over the past few weeks and she has improved.

AlphaBravoHenryFoxtons Tue 21-Jul-15 23:10:51

In fact some days I get glimpses of the exceptionally well trained dog she could have been in more experienced hands.

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