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Best breed of dog if not at home all day

(13 Posts)
Giddyuphorsey Sat 03-Jan-15 23:13:04

In the very early process of thinking about and researching getting a dog. I have 2 children (7 and 10) and a reasonable size house and garden with access to countryside. I do however work and whilst there are days I work at home there are other days I may be out for about 6 hours. Is there a breed of dog that is more likely to be able to cope with this? I'm hoping to rehome a dog rather than get a puppy.
Just after some advice/experience of others.
Thanks in advance

Buttholelane Sat 03-Jan-15 23:22:05

Just ask the rescue for a dog that is good with kids and can be left on it's own for a few hours smile

lemisscared Sat 03-Jan-15 23:23:51

a cuddly toy wink

lemisscared Sat 03-Jan-15 23:25:31

just japing - i think each dog is different but mist rescues would be reluctant to rehome a dog if left over 4 hours. could you employ a dog walker?

MrsPnut Sat 03-Jan-15 23:28:34

We have an elderly collie lab cross, the most stupid dog in the world but she is happy to snooze all day so long as she gets a few decent walks.

I work 6 hours a day and we have a friend who walks the dog at lunchtime most days, she can cope if a day is missed but it does mean she needs walking the minute we get home opposed to waiting until 6pm or so.

butterfliesinmytummy Sat 03-Jan-15 23:31:59

Not even a behaviourist will recommend a certain breed if you are looking for a particular temperament. Some breeds require more or less exercise or stimulation based on physical size and working backgrounds but dogs are like people, there are anxious ones, laid back ones, nervous ones, lazy ones etc. Breed rarely comes into it.

We have a mixed breed rescue and I've had to find a job where I can work from home because we don't think dogs should be left all day. We got her at 8 weeks from a shelter and her true temperament was unknown. She was a shivering wreck with visible ribs, now she's super playful, everyone's friend and ruler of our household..... It's so difficult to tell.

butterfliesinmytummy Sat 03-Jan-15 23:32:42

Not even a behaviourist will recommend a certain breed if you are looking for a particular temperament. Some breeds require more or less exercise or stimulation based on physical size and working backgrounds but dogs are like people, there are anxious ones, laid back ones, nervous ones, lazy ones etc. Breed rarely comes into it.

We have a mixed breed rescue and I've had to find a job where I can work from home because we don't think dogs should be left all day. We got her at 8 weeks from a shelter and her true temperament was unknown. She was a shivering wreck with visible ribs, now she's super playful, everyone's friend and ruler of our household..... It's so difficult to tell.

OneDayWhenIGrowUp Sat 03-Jan-15 23:33:37

A cat!

LeoandBoosmum Sat 03-Jan-15 23:33:46

Inquire at local dogs' homes. I think it's really nice and admirable that you want to get a rescue dog. However, I think some dogs' home will not adopt out to people who will not be home for around six hours at a time. I know someone who was turned down for that reason. I suppose they want to be reassured that you can commit and won't be bringing the dog back because it's not fitting in with a family's timetable (can't do dogs much good when they get returned).
As long as dogs are fed, kept warm, interacted with, walked regularly etc, they can normally cope with being left up to six hours. A rescue centre may ask if you are willing to get a dog walker for the days you will be out for around six hours. Maybe that wouldn't be a requirement in summer when being outdoors for six hours would be okay as long as the dog has good shelter, food, water, maybe a toy or two, and he or she gets plenty of attention when you're home smile
IMO being with a loving family and being left alone for six hours at a time is preferable to being in a dogs' home, as long as there's plenty of interaction and walkies when you're home. smile
Keep us updated.

18yearstooold Sat 03-Jan-15 23:36:21

Dammit

I just came on to say cat but was beaten to it

LoveVintage Sat 03-Jan-15 23:42:13

Generally six hours is too long to leave a dog home alone. Four is more acceptable. You would need to make arrangements for a dog walker or someone to at least come in to let dog out for the toilet and fill up water bowl. Even then dog would probably need walking soon after you get home. Think hard about how/if this will fit in with you and your DC.

Trust me when using say that when you get a dog, and you work, you spend your whole life juggling how to fit in work, DC and dog walks into each day. Dogs still need walked during school holidays, despite illness etc. It us not a decision to be made lightly.

Don't buy from internet, gumtree etc. You never know who you are buying from.

butterfliesinmytummy Sat 03-Jan-15 23:47:32

Agree with lovevintage, I think 6 hours is a long time to leave a dog. Ours has been left that long once and I was rushing to get back to her. We don't do days out as a family any more unless I book the dog in with the dog sitter for a weekend. It's a bit like having a very small child..... Except that you have to walk every day come hell, high water, snow, ice or horizontal rain. And having just about got to the end of the Christmas holidays, you have to drag your whingeing kids along too. Don't forget picking up poo from the lawn too.

Don't get me wrong, I dearly love our dog and wouldn't ever be without her but, even as a dog owner a few years ago, it's easy to underestimate the amount of constrictions they place on your life.

Mitzi50 Sat 03-Jan-15 23:49:13

I have 2 rescue dogs - greyhound and staffie cross - on the days I work they are left for 6 hours. I told the rescue centres, the days and hours I work and left it to them to choose a suitable dog. Both dogs are fine with being left possibly because they have each other. The greyhound did get very depressed when his first companion died and he was left on his own.

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