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Dog-owner Virgin: what to do about the Christmas tree???

(20 Posts)
Queenofknickers Mon 01-Dec-14 17:59:06

This is our first christmas with our DDog and I don't know what are the do's and donts when it comes to christmas trees. She is 9 months old and large (collie x) and I have no idea how she will react to a tree with lights appearing. Also we usually get a real tree - will that hurt her if she gives it a chew? Plus she sleeps in the sitting room overnight where is where we always have the tree (not really anywhere else...) and I don't know if she's likely to chew/shred wrapping or presents. Any advice please?

tabulahrasa Mon 01-Dec-14 18:28:49

Is she a chewer anyway?

If she's still chewy you might be better having one up out of the way (I have a small tree on a shelving unit because my dog is a git, lol)

If she's not a chewer, she'll probably ignore it like anything else that's not hugely interesting to dogs...though I once had one that was adamant that baubles were dog balls.

Floralnomad Mon 01-Dec-14 18:33:46

We have an artificial tree ,because of the needles . My dog doesn't take any notice of the tree but he would unwrap presents if left with them . He likes unwrapping things !

Queenofknickers Mon 01-Dec-14 21:22:08

She loves balls, tearing paper and chewing.....not looking good is it?!

tabulahrasa Mon 01-Dec-14 21:26:07

Nope, lol.

I'd go for up off the floor where she can't reach, one you can move at night to a different room or just one in a different room.

If it's any consolation you might be ok for next year.

NCIS Tue 02-Dec-14 08:52:44

Have you got or could you get a playpen (the old fashioned wooden sort) and put the tree in that?
We had a real tree last year when ddog was five months old and supervised when he was in with it, good for practising a leave command. He didn't sleep in there and was crated at night though.

hoochymama1 Tue 02-Dec-14 09:43:39

Snap , Q o K, hoochypup is 8 months and we love real trees too hmm I was thinking, a small potted one highish up...I think our main problem will be pressies, most of which will be hers anyway lol grin

Hoppinggreen Tue 02-Dec-14 10:13:08

Our dog wasn't generally a chewer but he did love eating presents!!!
Glittery poo as well!!!

Aked Tue 02-Dec-14 13:10:54

Here you are

averylongtimeago Tue 02-Dec-14 14:20:18

This year go for one on a table - I wouldn't put prezzies where they can be chewed either - and absolutely don't put chocolate things on the tree!

BreconBeBuggered Tue 02-Dec-14 15:00:25

I gave up on the notion of a tree altogether this year when DoggyBeBuggered decided the fluffy pompom on the end of a Santa hat had to be a new kind of dog toy. Goodness knows what he'd make of a plant covered in lovely shiny things: I only have one plant in the house, a cactus, and he thinks that's his to maul and use as an alternative drinking bowl.
Other decorations and lights are up and out of reach. We've always had resue dogs and never one this young before, so we hope he'll be ready to leave a proper tree unmolested next year.

kippersmum Tue 02-Dec-14 23:30:26

Love the playpen idea NCIS. Am I right in thinking you own a young collie? Kipper is 14mo old & I have also been thinking about the christmas tree problem.

Littlemeg37 Tue 02-Dec-14 23:37:06

I must of just been lucky, Ive never had any bother with any dog (when a puppy) or cat (when a kitten) bothering my tree. Tbh I just never thought about it and tree went up as normal, cats have a bit swipe at bottom baubles but thats it. I have had chewers before, my current dog (whos nearly 15) chewed every chair, edge of table and destroyed my cooker buttons (twice) when she was a pup but never bothered the tree smile

ErrolTheDragon Tue 02-Dec-14 23:44:37

Our dog and the current one pretty much ignore the tree. Obviously no chocolate decorations. The one exception was that the year before last he left us a 'present' under the tree twice. hmm

I keep the pressies out of the way till xmas eve so the dog isn't left with them unsupervised (he adores unwrapping his own) and any edible ones are kept out of his reach.

NCIS Wed 03-Dec-14 05:23:42

Kipper I am 'owned' by a Collie, he's 16 months old now and , to be fair, never showed any interest in the tree last year, I'm only concerned this year as he obviously cocks his leg now and it is a real tree. He has never marked inside so I'm hoping his training stands firm.
He's generally still closely supervised if in the sitting room, I close the door if we're out and at night.
I've worked hard on the 'leave' command and he's generally pretty well behaved.

Queenofknickers Wed 03-Dec-14 14:42:37

I'm trying to keep DCs happy too, they want the usual 6ft real tree with all decs and pressies to shake underneath confused aaaaaaaaaaargh

Queenofknickers Wed 03-Dec-14 14:45:13

Add to the mix 3 cats (one is 14 and doesn't care) but the other 2 are 1 yr old and probably haven't seen an Xmas tree before (last year they were in a shelter). Maybe I should just go for it BUT film the inevitable carnage and send it to you've been framed - I need £250!!!!!!!!

cavkc Wed 03-Dec-14 14:53:13

With a real tree there is always the possibility of them cocking their leg against it!

My dogs are getting on a bit but they still remove the baubles and eat them ... Very festive glittery poo in the garden

Also, they following is really bad for them, some life threatening

Chocolate, one if mine ate a chocolate muffin and had to rush him to vets. You can't wait for symptoms to develop as by then it could be too late as they have ingested it.
Grapes
Raisins .. Christmas cakes, mince pies etc
Xylitol which is found in sugar free foods such as chewing gum
Onions
Garlic
Mushrooms
Peach and nectarine stones
Alcohol

holmessweetholmes Wed 03-Dec-14 17:14:40

Timely thread. I've been thinking about this too - we have a 10 week old German Shorthaired Pointer. I fear he will love a Christmas tree a bit too much. I think a small one out of reach may be the only option!

NCIS Fri 12-Dec-14 18:50:08

Our Christmas tree is up and being ignored by ddog.

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