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Slightly belated question about rescue dogs and rehoming with kids

(5 Posts)
Elibean Fri 30-Sep-11 14:30:19

I know reputable rescues (of which MTAR certainlly seems to be one) won't rehome dogs of unknown background - ie pound - to homes with small children.

Our about-to-be dog did spend the first couple of months of his life in the pound - then the rescue, and only 10 days in foster (with dogs, cats, chickens but no children - although he has met a few on days out with foster carer).

The rescue website did describe him as an ideal family dog, to grow up with kids...hence why I noticed him, along with good looks and soppy expression....and dd (4.5) has met him, no problems....but am I missing something? It doesn't feel like I am, iyswim, but??

Or does that rule generally just apply to adult dogs rather than big pups? He's 4-5 months old.

sununu Fri 30-Sep-11 16:16:29

I can't help at all, but I've been wondering the same. I've been totally converted to rescue by MN, but when I read eg. Ian Dunbar on the all-important young puppy window of socialisation that must not be missed, I worry about the poor start they may have had.
Actually I'm sitting here with a completed application form to Many Tears open that I have not quite got up the nerve to press send on.. (not exactly for that reason but just cold feet generally now I come to think that theoretically that puppy could possibly live with us, soon and for ever...)

DooinMeCleanin Fri 30-Sep-11 16:54:35

At 4/5 months old his personality is still shaping. The rescue will have spoken with the pound and will be liasing with the foster carer to build up a full background on him.

I can only speak for myself here, but I imagine most fosterers are the same. I try to expose my fosters to as much as possible so as to build a fuller picture on what they are good with/scared of/need training on. I don't live with parrots or newborn babies, but I can tell you with confidence that niether would be an issue with my foster Grey, ducks otoh hmm

My foster grey had no socialastion at all during that all important 'window', she spent her days alone in a dark shed sad. I can honestly, hand on heart say of all the dogs in our family right now she is the best both with the dc and with other dogs and pets and I socialised Whippy myself, so I know she at least has had all the relevent training, she is not as solid or trustworthy as my Grey. Socialising is important, it is better to do it when they are young, but it's not the end of the world if it's done.

Many Tears work mainly with foster carers, this is particularly the case with yound dogs and puppies. The pups they have that have been raised within their rescue network will have had the best start that is is possible in life, with very experienced and dedicated carers.

Elibean Fri 30-Sep-11 17:53:12

Dooin, thank you once again - you are up there with Val now in my Doggy Help-Heroes gratitude stakes smile

I kind of thought that, but its good to have an experienced opinion. And our boy's foster carer is very experienced, she is the daughter of the rescue owner and has been fostering for ages....she says she takes our boy to shows (agility) with her and he has met loads of kids there.

sununu, I get the cold feet - totally relate. Cold feet are good, IMO, they make us think hard and be responsible. Once your cold feet warm enough to press 'send', I would be more than happy to share the nervy moments with you as we wait for our new family member!

silentcatastrophe Fri 30-Sep-11 19:58:02

It so much depends on what you want. If you want a dog for you, and you are looking after it, then you treat the relationship accordingly. I think a lot of people forget this. Two of our dogs do not like children, but the children have learned from the dogs and the dogs have learned from the children and we live peacefully. There is a huge respect between the humans and the dogs. Our 3rd dog is more of a family dog. It rather depends on what you are prepared to put up with!

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