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Thinking of getting a great dane.

(13 Posts)
vampiresdontsparkle Thu 30-Jun-11 12:09:53

hey we are thinking of getting a great dane, and are looking for any advice and expriences. tia xx

PacificDogwood Thu 30-Jun-11 12:33:05

I think Great Danes are gorgeous dogs.

But they die too young sad- will always put me off that particular breed.
Sorry, no practical advice.

Scuttlebutter Thu 30-Jun-11 12:40:08

They are particularly prone to bloat so you need to be very careful with feeding. Having said that they are beautiful dogs. Have a look at [[ http://www.great-dane-care.org.uk/index.htm Great Dane Care ]] - I've met them several times at various charity dog events and they do a great job and really know their stuff.

coccyx Thu 30-Jun-11 22:17:45

have/ had 2 2 great danes so far!!!!
Wonderful nature, great with children.
Need to consider that they do take up quite a bit of space!!! Particularly on the settee!
Got our first dane puppy from GREAT DANE ADOPTION SOCIETY Lots of advice on reducing bloat, how to care for them etc on their website ( also some lovely pics!!!)

extremepie Fri 08-Jul-11 10:51:01

Do it! They are gorgeous, loving, gentle dogs!

Yes, they do tend to have a shorter life span than other breeds but I don't think that should be a deterrent, as the time you do get with them is so wonderful smile

They are also prone to a number of health problems due to their size:
Bloat - very dangerous but the risk can be reduced by feeding them from a raised bowl and feeding small meals throughout the day (3/4 times a day).

Arthritis and Hip Dysplasia - Bone and joint problems in general are more common but again risk can be reduced by not allowing them to jump and run too much, especially when young and the bones are still growing.

Unfortunately problems like cardiomyopathy (enlarged heart) there isn't really much you can do about it, they will get it or not whatever you do. One thing I would really recommend is insurance with lifetime cover, ie, if they develop a condition like arthritis which will need long term care you are covered for that condition for the life of the dog, not just the first year.

Dane vet care tends to be pretty expensive due to their size but if you have a good insurance company this should take care of most of it.

They don't need that much exercise, don't really shed, are usually good with kids and other dogs, curious rather than aggressive but obviously ever dog is different!

Totally recommend them, just do a bit of research :D

walesblackbird Fri 08-Jul-11 10:56:04

Never owned one but known a couple and they are beautiful, soft and friendly dogs. My mum's neighbour has one and he is just gorgous and as soft and dopey as anything. My 5 year old daughter adores him and on one occasion before I could get to her quickly enough she stuck her head through the neighbour's open window where said doggie was. And he just licked her!

Big, loving and playful - but take up a lot of space and have a tendency to bowl you over when they run at you playfully!

coccyx Fri 08-Jul-11 20:26:46

Forgot to say males of household need to watch out when tail is furiously swishing!!!!

sharbie Fri 08-Jul-11 20:28:41

lovely dogs, only live to about 7 though sad and lots of running down your arm drool when you pat them

MotherJack Fri 08-Jul-11 21:19:32

My friend has a young Dane (around 1 now, I think) and my teeny OldLady loves him. She fusses all around him (and tells him off when he sniffs her bum too hard!). He is such a gentle creature and is absolutely hilarious when hiding bones from OldLady in his chops (he has her constantly in his field of vision and stops chewing the minute she casts him a gimlet eye.... then restarts chewing the minute she wanders off, confused as to where the bone is grin).

Anyway, he is a lovely gentle soul, even as a (mahoosive) puppy. My friend got him to spark a glimmer of interest in her son, who is sick and she chose the breed because they are good with kids and don't need a lot of exercise. Also, she has the biggest house in the kingdom, which I believe helps - as someone pointed out previously, they do take up an awful lot of space.

OldBagWantsNewBag Sun 10-Jul-11 15:37:14

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MotherJack Sun 10-Jul-11 23:18:40

You say that, OldBag, but surely it's more of a case that no one would notice another one, surely (overlooks size issue).

OldBagWantsNewBag Sun 10-Jul-11 23:31:24

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

NunTheWiser Mon 11-Jul-11 09:06:51

All the GDs I have met have been beautiful dogs with the most amazing temperaments. Another mum at the DC's school has 2 GDs and says they are totally chilled, need very little exercise (although lots of space), eat much less than you would think but do GINORMOUS poos. grin
I hadn't appreciated how big they get until we met a GD pup who has become another regular at the dog park. He is 5 months old and weighs over 40kgs. When he is an adult, they think he will get to 90kgs - apparently his dad is a "Big Boy" even for GDs.

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