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Our Yorkshire Farm

(164 Posts)
sniffingthewax Sun 10-Nov-19 09:47:17

Have watched this family for years and read her books. Age is really catching up on Clive, he can hardly bend over now, it is very apparent in this new series. I don't like how the programme is becoming more contrived, it's obvious a lot of it is staged for the camera.

Acciocats Tue 03-Dec-19 18:35:37

Yes they’re certainly not a typical family. It seems impossible these days though to do a reality show without there being some attention grabbing angle to it

derxa Tue 03-Dec-19 18:28:21

This has been fascinating. The fact is that the Owens are very unusual in that they have so many children, Amanda has this media career etc.
Most farm children have lives just like your kids. They go to school, after school clubs and hobbies. They go to university and don't go into farming. Farmer's wives go out to work (they need to) and their children go to childcare and nursery.
There are many different types of farming apart from sheep farming which is probably the most child friendly. Farmers don't tend to have so many of their own machinery now. They hire in contractors. So many variables.

Sistercharlie Tue 03-Dec-19 18:08:10

I never said people weren't allowed an opinion housinghelp1.
I simply expressed my own!

Acciocats Tue 03-Dec-19 18:06:08

Derxa of course children should be outside on a farm! But it needs to be with proper supervision, not whizzing around on quad bikes like that or climbing on hay bales.

Farming is an interesting one because in practically any other job, you’d have to organise childcare, you couldn’t just drag your kids along to work, but of course there’s a lot of blurred boundaries when you’re living on the job like the Owens are. I do think there’s a balance to be struck though: if they were both needed to be working on the farm maybe organising some level of proper childcare would be sensible, because no way can you be supervising children adequately when you’re operating machinery. It’s hard to believe they’re really strapped for cash- why have 9 children (11 in his case) if they are? There was also a strong feeling (as with that other well known big family!) that the older children were there to serve the needs of the parents with childcare etc which really isn’t fair.

housinghelp101 Tue 03-Dec-19 18:00:31

Sister Amanda has made the choice to actively put herself and the family out there. I didn't realise quite how 'out there' she is - it seems her calendar is heavily booked - so I can't see why people are not allowed to have an opinion, even if it's criticism? I can't imagine she's the type to really care either, I don't suppose she's crying over the back of this thread. The HSE (and their opinion does matter) have spoken out against them since they first appeared and the Owens haven't felt the need to toe the line, so I doubt they are going to feel bullied into wearing overalls or donning helmets because a few mumsnetters have expressed concern.

derxa Tue 03-Dec-19 17:35:57

www.nfus.org.uk/userfiles/images/Policy/Farm%20Safety/2018%20-%20FSW%20030_sfl_July18.pdf
Farming is a dangerous industry and here is a cautionary tale. The above article features someone I know very well, Jimmy Warnock. What his daughter did was due to a lack of caution and being in a hurry. She's totally fine now.
However it is a dilemma. Should children never be outside on a farm?

Sistercharlie Tue 03-Dec-19 17:20:28

Acciocats if you read my post carefully you will see that I was referring to the overall thread as "horrible" : the general criticism of Amanda (her clothing choices, her leaving her child in hospital, her TV appearances etc ) I was not referring specifically to the quad bike safety issue in that context. Also - when I did comment on safety - I very carefully and deliberately referred to specific dangers about raising livestock, so please don't twist my words.

housinghelp101 Tue 03-Dec-19 17:09:26

^that is obviously just my opinion though, doesn't in any way suggest her mothering is in any way not satisfactory.

housinghelp101 Tue 03-Dec-19 17:07:10

I had a baby in SCBU and cannot imagine leaving it there for 3-4 days without anyone from the family even visiting it. Obviously it's needs are being cared for in hospital, but it's a newborn and one that is ill. I would expect my partner in that case to employ someone to help on the farm so he could be more at home. I assume Amanda made her own decision based on what she thought was best, which is fair enough, but not something I can relate to at all. I would have thought the hospital would frown upon that too, when my DC was in my visits were noted in his file and their perception of how I was bonding with him.

Acciocats Tue 03-Dec-19 16:59:58

I haven’t read the book so can’t comment on her leaving her baby, but having had a baby in NICU myself I completely understand that when you have older children at home they need you too. So very low to criticise Amanda for not being in hospital 24/7

However That was just one poster I think. The vast majority of criticism is about their lack of regard for their children s safety. They may well have been around the farm all their lives but most farm accidents happen to people who live and/ or work on the farm so familiarity is no safety net.

And it makes no odds whether they’ve been living on the farm all their life if the quad bike hits a rock or some other hazard and overturns - they are far more likely to be seriously hurt without helmets. It was the lack of helmets which struck me most actually. Just such a simple thing to sort- it’s a basic rule that you put it on before riding. I’m amazed anyone can think it’s ‘horrible’ to point that out

MrsPelligrinoPetrichor Tue 03-Dec-19 15:10:38

The comment about having to leave the baby in the hospital for short periods is explained in detail in the book - so pretty low to pick on her for that - she did have to balance the needs of the entire family

Having had a baby in SCBU myself I can't imagine not going home and spending time with older kids at home ,it's not like you can have loads of kids in special care visiting,is it?

thenightsky Tue 03-Dec-19 15:02:30

I used to trail around after my grandad in a timber yard with huge big lathes without guards on. I remember going up a tower crane with him in winter once and all the steps were iced up. shock I'd never let my DC do that... god knows what my mother was thinking!

Sistercharlie Tue 03-Dec-19 14:57:50

And as for being around animals and the danger - it's far less dangerous if you are there with your parents learning from when you're a toddler - to suddenly starting from scratch at 12 yrs or whatever. Livestock can be dangerous and unpredictable. You need a lot of confidence born of experience to cope properly. And you need to build strength and a good work ethic too.

Sistercharlie Tue 03-Dec-19 14:50:47

What a horrible thread. The children are lovely and are having a fantastic upbringing!

The comment about having to leave the baby in the hospital for short periods is explained in detail in the book - so pretty low to pick on her for that - she did have to balance the needs of the entire family.

And why should Amanda just confine herself to overalls if she doesn't want to?

Criticise a person for confining her children to the farm and not giving them enough holidays and experiences elsewhere. Then criticise her for having the temerity for being "in front of a camera" writing books and going on telly that will bring her the money to do those things! You can't win with some people.

MrsPelligrinoPetrichor Tue 03-Dec-19 14:37:40

Don't most children trail around after parents/grandparents helping out,I was the same as you derxa not on a farm but we had land and lots of potential dangerous equipment around and we just helped out.

derxa Tue 03-Dec-19 14:26:06

Sure, they learned the skills to actually help as they grew older but there’s no way those little ones were performing some vital function during the animal feeding. I used to trail after my dad from a very young age 'helping' and I did it because I enjoyed it. There were only two of us and mum was a full time farmer's wife.

MrsPelligrinoPetrichor Tue 03-Dec-19 14:19:27

Sure, they learned the skills to actually help as they grew older but there’s no way those little ones were performing some vital function during the animal feeding

I get it ,but I don't think there is anything wrong with kids helping out while their parents work as long as they're safe

Acciocats Tue 03-Dec-19 13:15:13

MrsPelligrinoPetrichor I think maybe you misunderstood my point, which is that there is nothing different in principle to kids trailing around a warehouse and trailing around a farm. Both are potentially dangerous workplaces. People only have a sentimental romanticised view of the latter because it’s seen as wholesome and it’s outdoors. The fact is, the children should not be operating or working on machinery when they are too young (and there are regulations about this) and they should not be riding around on quad bikes without helmets or piled on vehicles designed for a single user

And of course there’s nothing wrong with learning to feed the sheep! My point there was simply in response to someone saying they were helping out on the farm. It was pretty plain that the tiny children were carted around because both parents were working and had no free babysitter on tap while the elder girl was at school. Sure, they learned the skills to actually help as they grew older but there’s no way those little ones were performing some vital function during the animal feeding.

derxa Tue 03-Dec-19 12:54:56

BUT in principle this is no different to having your kids trailing after you in a warehouse, climbing on shelves etc It is. The kids would just be playing in a dangerous place in a warehouse. On the farm the Owens are anticipating danger every minute.
My kids were brought up as townies and I was a nervous wreck walking them along a pavement and crossing roads.
Actually one of the greatest problems in farming is poor mental health and suicide.

MrsPelligrinoPetrichor Tue 03-Dec-19 12:45:03

The younger kids were chucking hay out for the sheep but quite honestly it wasn’t anything the parents couldn’t do themselves (or get others to do if they bought in help)

Why shouldn't they learn how to feed the sheep?

Acciocats Tue 03-Dec-19 12:31:48

Derxa I have no idea of their finances, my point was that they have a responsibility towards their children and also to anyone working on the farm. Some farmers do have farm hands either on a casual or long term basis.

The fundamental issue though (which was why I didn’t understand your pp) is that the principle is exactly the same whether it’s a farm, or whether they are living over the shop or running a factory. The younger children aren’t born knowing how to help; it was clear that they were only there out of necessity when they were small (when elder girl not available to child mind) Yes as they got older they were being trained up to do jobs BUT in principle this is no different to having your kids trailing after you in a warehouse, climbing on shelves etc. Gradually they would learn some helpful skills but that doesn’t justify putting them in unsafe situations. I think it’s only because it’s the wholesome outdoors and not a factory that some people defend them

derxa Tue 03-Dec-19 12:11:51

or get others to do if they bought in help Are you being serious here?
Farming is not a well paid endeavour especially not hill sheep farming.
The point is that the they are teaching the kids how to farm and farming is often repeated mundane tasks.
Would I allow my child to go on a quad without a helmet? Possibly. Would I put that on TV if it was my business/livelihood? Most certainly not. Good point.
Anyway I don't know why I'm defending Amanda so much. I don't even like her grin
Much more realistic farming programmes are ones like This Farming Life That featured a buffalo farmer who was gored by one of his animals. No health and safety rules can stop that.

housinghelp101 Tue 03-Dec-19 11:44:56

Sorry for your loss Derxa As i said I don't know anything about farming and although they appear to have a lovely life, I'm going on the link above stating that farming is the most hazardous place of work and it probably isn't in their best interest to advertise their breaches of H&S on national tv. Would I allow my child to go on a quad without a helmet? Possibly. Would I put that on TV if it was my business/livelihood? Most certainly not.

Acciocats Tue 03-Dec-19 11:42:19

Today 10:26 derxa

If the Owens owned a factory and showed multiple children on forklifts indoors, or children climbing high shelving units I don't think their reaction would be the same.

That wouldn't happen because they would be in the way.

I don’t really understand the above point. No doubt the kids are in the way a lot of the time on the farm. Apart from the older lad who came in handy fixing machinery, the little kids were basically being carted around out of necessity. When the older girl was at school they had no on tap baby minder. The younger kids were chucking hay out for the sheep but quite honestly it wasn’t anything the parents couldn’t do themselves (or get others to do if they bought in help)

derxa Tue 03-Dec-19 10:37:32

I'm probably the wrong person to discuss this. My brother (a farmer) was killed by a car while he was a pedestrian

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