Advertisement

loader

Talk

Advanced search

Please be aware - Police cautions

(16 Posts)
whoknew Tue 21-Oct-08 22:32:34

Hi, first time on this site, and first post, so bear with me if this has come up before.

During the last 3 years, two of my teenage children have been detained by local police, and dealt with unlawfully.

Won't bore you with the details, but in the most serious incident recently, my 18 yr old daughter almost accepted a police caution for an offence she did not commit, as she had the impression this would be a 'ticking off' - and if she accepted a caution, there would be no record, and also no need to tell her parents that she had been detained.

She was very wrong, a caution is a very serious matter, but she did not get legal advice at the time she was detained.

My advice is, even if you think there is no chance that your kids will find themselves in this position, is to make it very clear that if they are questioned, or detained for any reason, they should take advantage of the presence of a legal advisor every time.

(My daughter called the police to help her to deal with a feuding couple, and when she tried to go home, she was unlawfully detained, shoved by an overbearing police officer, and then accused of assault herself - so that the officer could justify the push.)

To try and cut a long story short, she elected to refuse a caution, and argue her case in court. In fact, the case did not proceed due to lack of evidence and she is now suing the police.

I am a former police officer, her dad is a police officer, her grandad was, and her uncle is also a police inspector. I am not anti police, but I am so shocked by the way this has turned out, it has led me to conclude that the caution system is being grossly misused.

I think young people are particularly vulnerable to this arbitary form of justice, and once you have accepted a caution, it is on your record for life, as an admission of guilt.

Helium Tue 21-Oct-08 22:42:06

Really interesting - thanks for posting - I dont have teenagers yet (give it 12 years!) - but worth knowing anyway!!
Thanks

funkypumpkin Wed 22-Oct-08 10:17:11

Thanks for posting that very interesting.

SheSellsSeashellsByTheSeashore Wed 22-Oct-08 10:24:26

Has this just changed recently then? Because I'm fairly sure I got a least one caution as a teen )(though I was never detained) and i don't think I have a criminal record.

It was sort of a "Oh well we will just take your name and adress and let you off with a caution this time but it will be kept on file for x amount of time if it happens again"

I have no teens either but will make sure to keep this in mind. I live in a rough town with not a lot to do. So there is a chance that my dd's will have run in's with the police. Most teens here do for hanging around in groups on the streets but after the very few youth clubs close there is no where else for them to go.

TarkaLiotta Wed 22-Oct-08 10:31:08

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

livinginadreamworld Wed 22-Oct-08 10:31:53

my best mate accepted a caution, for something her ex boyfriend had done - not her, she was drunk and the police said "except the caution and you can go home" so she did. A caution shows up on a enhanced CRB check, so her chilcare qualifications are now useless and her dreams of becoming a midwife over......

childrenofthecornsilk Wed 22-Oct-08 10:34:38

Interesting post op - thanks.

SheSellsSeashellsByTheSeashore Wed 22-Oct-08 10:35:02

So can't you challenge cautions then? If they are wrongly given I mean like in livingadreamworld's friend's case?

summer111 Wed 22-Oct-08 16:12:07

As livinginadreamworld has emphasised, cautions do appear on enhanced CRB's so basically rule you out for any career working with children or vulnerable adults.

At a course I attended recently, the tutor stated that you can receive a caution witout knowing and cited an example of a woman going to the police 'claiming' that her partner had hit her. The partner may not ever know he has a caution at all until he applies for a job necessitating a CRB check. I don't know if that is the law and you can receive a caution without knowing but that's what we were told...

summer111 Wed 22-Oct-08 16:12:09

As livinginadreamworld has emphasised, cautions do appear on enhanced CRB's so basically rule you out for any career working with children or vulnerable adults.

At a course I attended recently, the tutor stated that you can receive a caution witout knowing and cited an example of a woman going to the police 'claiming' that her partner had hit her. The partner may not ever know he has a caution at all until he applies for a job necessitating a CRB check. I don't know if that is the law and you can receive a caution without knowing but that's what we were told...

summer111 Wed 22-Oct-08 16:12:46

oops!

childrenofthecornsilk Wed 22-Oct-08 16:13:22

Does this include motoring offences?

edam Wed 22-Oct-08 16:27:24

Good point, whoknew.

Summer, that story from your tutor sounds very odd. What field are they in? Because I thought someone had to accept a caution - the police can't just issue one without telling you! And the description of the tutor saying the woman was 'claiming' her partner hit her and managed somehow to get this guy a secret caution sounds like a bitter misogynist at work, tbh.

ScummyMummy Wed 22-Oct-08 16:31:49

livinginadreamworld- as long as your friend's caution was not for a violent offence or something that would obviously make her unsuitable to work with children, she may still be able to get work or get on a midwifery course. She will need to be honest and upfront about the caution. In my experience, some workers do have these sorts of things on their record and as long as they are minor offences from some time in the past on an otherwise clean sheet, employers may be more understanding than might be expected.

Upwind Wed 22-Oct-08 16:38:49

There was a case in the papers this year where, IIRC, a father slapped his unruly teen for the first time in her life as she was tormenting the neighbours. In a temper she called the police but had changed her mind by the time they showed up. They insisted on arresting him anyway and he accepted a caution, which he thought was a "ticking off" but it ended his career and meant he could not even coach kids' football. The daughter was interviewed and was very sorry about what she had done...

TheFallenMadonna Wed 22-Oct-08 16:42:09

Yes, it's the nature of the offence and not the offence itself that matters I think.

Obviously hitting a child - even an unruly one - would raise real question marks over your suitablility for working with children, and surely that would have been known to the man in question.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now