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DD not overweight, but can see her getting that way

(13 Posts)
circular Wed 03-Aug-11 13:00:04

DD1 nearly 14, a healthy size 10 to 12, ~ 5ft 3" and 8.5st.
So not exactly overweight, but getting a bit of a tummy.

Eats very well - too well, a real foodie. Good quality home cooked food (bith DH and her love cooking), too large portion sizes. But could be heavier on the veg and fruit.

Much less active than she used to be, partly due to a physical problem, which has meant she has had to give up most forms of physical activity. All she does now is swimming a maximum of once a week, and a few daily exercises from her physio.

I suspect she will stop growing in height fairly soon (started periods 18 months ago). Although she is still smaller than both DH and I.

DH doesn't see a problem, but I think he sometimes still sees her as the very prem baby she was. As it took years before she was eating properly, he is thankful that she does now.

DD herself is beginning to notice bulges, and has asked if I think she is overweight. I always so NO - but she needs to start getting more active and tone up. I also hint that perhaps less butter, cream and fat in her cooking would help. As would going easier on the cakes and chocolate. But the last thing I want to do is spark off an eating disorder.

ragged Wed 03-Aug-11 13:09:48

She's the age when girls stop being scrawny sticks and get their true curves. It can feel like flabby pudge rather than becoming womanly.
I guess if it were me the next time she asked (or maybe sooner) I'd show her BMI charts (for her age) on several websites; I wonder if there's a way for her to verify that her clothing size is about right, too.

Being toned to me should be more about feeling strong and energetic in your own skin, maybe I'd tackle it that way, rather than about how she "looks".

colditz Wed 03-Aug-11 13:14:56

Talk to her about how her periods mean she should move to a more 'adult' way of eating - and model a very good reasonably low fat diet, and get her to join you in it.

circular Wed 03-Aug-11 13:21:30

Ragged - According to the calculators her BMI is healthy for her age, although at the higher end percentile wise.

Colditz - that made me laugh. Her and DH together poo-poo my healthy, low fat eating. Mealtimes in our house are often them vs me - with 8 year old DD2 changing sides regularly.

I feel it's more the lack of activity that needs addressing. At the moment, everything hurts her.

CMOTdibbler Wed 03-Aug-11 13:22:08

How about going on a healthy cooking course together ? Our local cookery school does them, so its lovely food, just lower cal.

Also, how about talking to her physio about other ways to exercise - could she do pilates/yoga or aquaaerobics ?

If she will have restricted activity long term, then the combination of that and being a foodie is a bad combination weight wise

ragged Wed 03-Aug-11 13:25:27

Does even swimming hurt? There must be a way to take the edge off, something she can do with friends or that she'll adore enough to put up with some discomfort (like horse-riding).

circular Wed 03-Aug-11 13:45:09

Swimming is fine, she does a little but does not really enjoy it.

Basically cannot do anything high impact or where she has to twist. Mainly knees, and ankles slightly.

She used to enjoy hockey, netball and football at school. And ice-skating with friends. All these are out now. She also did karate from age 5, was a brown belt at 9 or 10, then could not progress. It is possible that the karate contributed to her problems. We have discussed with the physio whether she could return to this, but she now says she would not want to anyway.

Horse riding is definitely out for a number of reasons.

When she starts D of E later this year, she will need a physical activity. Looks like it will have to be archery or table tennis lol.

CMOTdibbler Wed 03-Aug-11 13:53:48

Cycling or a water based activity would be good then - my mum has terrible back/hip problems, but can do aquafit to her hearts content as long as she is in deeper water. Or canoeing ?

startail Wed 03-Aug-11 14:02:26

Aqua fit is normally adults only, but as she's as tall as many adults she could do it. Some pools do deep water keep fit too. Talk to your GP as the pool may relax age rules on medical grounds.

circular Wed 03-Aug-11 14:15:24

The aquafit sounds great - must make some enquireis.

Cycling definitely out as her knees are affected most.

Canoing, we have considered but not sure what's avaialble locally. or whether it requires much knee bending like rowing does?

ragged Thu 04-Aug-11 15:37:18

kayaking definitely puts no stress on knees ime.

debrs4 Fri 05-Aug-11 13:19:22

I am at a complete loss as to how to tackle these issues. Have 2 daughters, now aged 23 and 15. With first one followed all the advice - reassurance, not making food an issue, etc. With second took completely different approach - constant nagging about what she ate, pointing out overweight people and loudly voicing disapproval of such. They are now both exactly the same height, weight and build (about a stone heavier than they should be). Go figure.

debrs4 Fri 05-Aug-11 13:20:09

I am at a complete loss as to how to tackle these issues. Have 2 daughters, now aged 23 and 15. With first one followed all the advice - reassurance, not making food an issue, etc. With second took completely different approach - constant nagging about what she ate, pointing out overweight people and loudly voicing disapproval of such. They are now both exactly the same height, weight and build (about a stone heavier than they should be). Go figure.

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