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If you are over 45, how do you stay fashionable?

(157 Posts)
Destinysdaughter Mon 13-Mar-17 18:07:32

Or do you? I love fashion but tend to just wear clothes that suit my shape/colouring these days. I feel quite confident in my look and as I've always been quite busty, I've had to accept that a lot of fashionable clothes are cut for a completely different body shape and would look ridiculous on me.

So I try and stay current with accessories, shoes, jewellery etc. Wondered how other pp deal with this...?

AFierceBadRabbit Mon 13-Mar-17 19:35:13

But busty-ness isn't really age related is it?
I'm only 43, so still really young, but I imagine when I'm 45 I won't be doing all that much differently.
If a person has interest in fashion/style, you adapt it to your needs as you grow (older and/or wiser).

Less tat, more thought.
That's that.

Floisme Mon 13-Mar-17 19:47:22

Bustiness can be age related. I was flat chested till I hit 50 smile

I'm not so bothered about fashionable but I do like to look modern. I also still enjoy the silliness of fashion and I try and keep an open mind about anything new although very little is actually new for me these days. I'm always up for trying things on, even if it's only for a laugh (although leather leggings weren't so funny) because it's very easy to get stuck in a style rut.

It's good to know what suits you but what suits you isn't set in stone. I sometimes read posters on s&b who talk as if they've got their style all figured out now that they're 40. But the real game changer isn't turning 40, it's the menopause. There's a good chance you'll have a different body at 50 and different again at 60 and so on. Fashion can be good for getting you to rethink things every so often.

FrustratedFrugal Mon 13-Mar-17 20:21:39

I love fashion but I think I am learning to be more selective about it. I'm 44 and tend to integrate some trends into what I am wearing - only in colors and styles that suit me - but I also wear old favorites a lot.

Following a few key people on Instagram and a couple of blogs helps. Right now I am enjoying the 1990s revival. We know all about the 1990s, don't we wink

MaQueen Mon 13-Mar-17 20:58:34

I'm 6. A couple of months ago I realised I was very stuck in a rut when it came to fashion. And, I was sliding, alarmingly, down the slippery slope of White Stuff/FatFace frumpiness.

A kind soul on here directed me toward the 'My Fashionable 40s' blog, and she has become my style guru. I must have bought 2 dozen items recommended by her. I love her style, because she's quite casual, and wears lots of grey/back/pink but puts outfits together in a slightly quirky way, but still simple/classic.

Before reading her blog I wouldn't have thought of wearing black skinnies with leopard print ballet flats, or a black denim shift dress with mink ankle boots. But I love them. She's also got me shopping in Newlook and H&M and Zara, which I'd been avoiding assuming they were for teenagers. She's breathed some much needed fresh air into my wardrobe smile

MaQueen Mon 13-Mar-17 20:59:01

Errr, I'm not 6 FFS...I'm 46 grin

Niminy Mon 13-Mar-17 22:02:43

I've got more interested in clothes and fashion as I've got older, but the kinds of things I like have changed. I'd say my style has got less and less feminine and (sadly) my tastes now favour much more expensive clothes, which means that I try on about 25 things for every one that I buy.

KenDoddHairdo Mon 13-Mar-17 22:28:31

-Avoid middle aged choppy haircuts.
-Avoid the Breton top cliché. They make you look like a brick shit house (especially side on in photos sad )
-Avoid wearing scarves to "jazz" things up
-Don't fall into the capsule wardrobe trap; it's a bag of crap.

GertyTheGert Mon 13-Mar-17 23:34:56

I very much agree with KenDoddHairdo!!!! NO sodding "jazz you up" scarves - it looks bluddie awful - look at woss'erface from Birds of a Feather - someone has told her exactly that so she keeps wearing chiffony scarves ALL THE TIME - NOOOOO! Scarves per se, fine, but as a disguise, NO! Capsule wardrobe - yes its a trap, defo! And yes, choppy haircuts actually make us older gals look like we have "tried too hard". I'd say go for a softer haircut, espec a bit longer (its NOT ageing, its soft!). I also agree with MaQueen - leopardskin / giraffe / zebra pattern flatties "make" an outfit - espec in a sort-of clashy way eg with say maroon/green/blue togs. With a matchy handbag it all sort of links the outfit together! I am no fashion expert (being porky and old!) but I buy (ahem) Look magazine even though say 2 out of 4 mags are not filled with my age group stuff (its for say 18-30 yr olds??!!!), often there are fab fashion tips!! I am determined not to go frumpy and WILL dye me barnet as pale hair doesnt suit me, not cos I hate grey!!!!!

PickAChew Mon 13-Mar-17 23:40:33

I never was all that fashionable! If anything, I dress a lot better now than I did in my 20s.

And definitely not busty in my 20s. I didn't even bother with a bra for half of them. I'd trip over my boobs if I let them hang free, these days! I'm one of those awkward small band moderately large cup sizes that you can't even get in most high street shops.

PickAChew Mon 13-Mar-17 23:45:51

Before reading her blog I wouldn't have thought of wearing black skinnies with leopard print ballet flats, or a black denim shift dress with mink ankle boots.

I still wouldn't. My style is probably what HoC would describe as natural, though, so a lot of my wardrobe is Fat Face and Seasalt tops and tunics - usually teamed with some robust M&S skinnies which knock all the lumpy bits into shape. White stuff is a bit crap, for the price and make my eyes bleed so I don't bother.

I also wouldn't be able to walk in ballet flats. My feet never recovered from the last time that sort of unsupportive slip on shoe was fashionable.

PickAChew Mon 13-Mar-17 23:46:53

All I wear scarves for is to keep my neck warm. Most of the time, they make me too bloody hot!

GertyTheGert Tue 14-Mar-17 00:02:05

PS Just to further say, just cos we are over 45 it doesn't mean we cannot follow fashion! I personally avoid vibrant colour clothes but if the same "in" style comes in softer (not necessarily paler) shades I will wear what I think (ta Look mag!) is in fashion IF I can find that item AND I like it AND it suits my porkier outline (believe me, I am also older than you fellow posters!). I am no expert and make errors but at least I am trying (for myself, NOT for others!) I like the fashion for statement earrings so got some really nice ones from TopShop and Simply Be. An acquaintance who was VERY fashionable @ 20 yrs ago suddenly started wearing gilets, zip up tops, jeans/trousers and trainers nearly all the time - its sort of draining her personality away (how dare I say that!) but obvs its horses for courses. BTW I have various health probs so I'm not a simpering oldy with nil to think about but trying to be young - I just really like (some!) fashion!

GertyTheGert Tue 14-Mar-17 00:26:54

PPS PickaChew I do agree with you - I can't wear ballet flats any more! I wear what I call "flatties" but they aren't totally flat, they have a teeny tiny bit of a "heel" as such - how do I describe something that isn't really a heel at all???!? (see Hotties flats?) and I mainly wear the canvassy ones once winter/early spring has come to an end (so I curse rain in spring/summer!!!). I am no fan of Lulu but I like the way she generally dresses/has softer hair (NOT the sodding hats she wears tho!) - also Sandie Shaw - in fact yes, I put Sandie above Lulu - oops, no I put Cathy McGowan 2nd, THEN Lulu !!!! They don't strike me as muttony yet they are sort of fashionable and are older than me!

thelikelylass Tue 14-Mar-17 07:35:29

Hi i"m 40's and tend to stick to a uniform for work - M and S fitted black jacket, their skinny black trousers with gabor shoes/sandals in summer. I will wear slinky little vest tops or cotten sleeveless tops(boden) and cheapish blouses underneath (river island, h and M) and wear a jaeger coat/trench (bought in outlet) over dependent upon time of year. Very simple and all low maintenance, jazzed up with chunky silver necklaces (usually M and s)
For going out - skinny jeans (h and m, M and S, never more than £20) with heels, either wedges,courts or kitten heels, again I find H and M and River Island have great tops (wrap overs/blouses) and although cheap ( and I could afford more expensive) they can look great. Again, a nice camel coat (expensive) over jeans with boots or a tweedy/denim skirt.
Dresses - usually coast, I am a size 14 and quite busty, they sell great dresses in the sale at good prices. Hobbes style but much cheaper.
A good haircut and colour, light fake tan on face, clinique nude lipstick or poppy pop for going out. find a look and stick with it!

0dfod Tue 14-Mar-17 08:55:56

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

0dfod Tue 14-Mar-17 09:02:05

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MuseumOfCurry Tue 14-Mar-17 09:08:24

I tend to wear cashmere jumpers and skinny jeans with cute flats, it's not revolutionary but it works for me.

I also always have my hair blown dry professionally, and I do not cut it shorter than shoulder length - I feel that longer hair suits me and keeps me youthful. I have cut way back on highlights thanks to baleyage, which looks great grown out, and this has restored my hair nicely.

I carry a big expensive bag and try to keep the makeup to a minimum.

I steer clear of any trends, apart from jeans, really.

AuntieStella Tue 14-Mar-17 09:13:07

The over 45s stay fashionable in exactly the same way as people of all ages stay fashionable.

It's really not an age-related characteristic.

It's about looking at your size and shape, looking at what clothes suit you and you like, choosing colours you love etc.

You might be interested in fast fashion, or a classic style, or the hippie version, or whatever. You may have lost or gained weight, lost or gained tone and/or waistline, but that can happen at any age.

I suppose that sagginess is more associated with aging though. But a good bra solves droopy boobs, and looking for things with sleeves is a challenge for all age groups that want them.

MumBod Tue 14-Mar-17 09:14:17

42 here.

I'm finding that lines need to be cleaner as I get older. Too much faff (scarves etc) is ageing.
I also find that making sure you present yourself, rather than flinging a pair of jeans and a t-shirt on, helps you look like your finger's on the pulse. So, a certain style of jean, with thought-through trainers/shoes, etc. Effort.
Longer hair. I tried a pixie crop when I turned 41. It felt massively ageing and I've spent the past year growing it out.
A really good pair of big sunglasses, for days when it's all gone to shit.
Pick out a style icon who's a similar age and keep an eye on what they're doing. I think Victoria Beckham is looking bloody ace lately.
Remember who you are. I do all the above, but I still have my nose piercing. It's just that it's a real diamond now wink

Floisme Tue 14-Mar-17 09:16:06

I get very cranky over the short hair / long hair debate. And with all the other edicts. We don't all start looking the same just because we've hit middle age.

Ehsamy Tue 14-Mar-17 09:27:37

I find these threads bewildering - like the "how do I look sleek" ones.
But I keep reading them smile

Fatface can look frumpy or not, surely it depends on the item or how it's worn? And, my God, there is a load of shit in Zara.

And the hair thing, surely we work with what we've got and some suit long, others short but neither is necessarily ageing. I've never thought Annette Bening or Sharon Stone looked crap with short hair.

Floisme Tue 14-Mar-17 09:36:45

Exactly. We all suit different things. The only rule I follow is that my body is changing and I want my clothes to keep up.

pho3be Tue 14-Mar-17 09:42:38

I think it's harder as you get older to look good if you're overweight.. I'm 4 stone overweight & look awful in almost anything where I used to be able to wear my weight iyswim

MaybeDoctor Tue 14-Mar-17 09:43:19

Oh Odfod, that was so 'me' too!

Velvet jacket
Long flowing skirt
Ankle boots
Muslin embroidered tops
Long necklaces

I loved being me at 16!

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