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How do you use your beauty buff

(8 Posts)
daffodilssoon Tue 17-Jan-17 16:28:47

YouTube is full of gorgeous, dewy skinned beauties who don't even need foundation, I need a middle aged woman to demonstrate.

I dampen it the am supposed to pat or roll the foundation on.
Does it go on my face first, or on the sponge then apply directly?
So far I seem to have patted it all away.

Any handy hints?

hollinhurst84 Tue 17-Jan-17 17:10:23

I dampen mine - run under tap and then squeeze all the water out
Then put foundation on the back of my hand. Dab sponge in it and dab/pat on face
You can put foundation on face then blend but I just find it easier that way

hollinhurst84 Tue 17-Jan-17 17:12:18

Couldn't find you a middle aged woman grin but I did find this, and the video shows someone with vaguely normal skin using it
https://www.birchbox.com/magazine/article/how-to-use-a-beautyblender-like-a-pro-makeup-artist

daffodilssoon Tue 17-Jan-17 17:17:02

Thanks for that, it's the rolling motion I struggle with.
That clip looks easy to follow.
MN should have a YouTube S&B channel, lots of people would follow it.

TeethDrama Tue 17-Jan-17 17:18:06

If you have a medium-full coverage foundation and want a slightly less heavy look then dampen. For full coverage, don't dampen. If I had a light-medium foundation, I wouldn't dampen.

I find it easier to apply dots on my cheeks, nose, chin and forehead, smudge it in slightly and then use the blender. Otherwise you get an intense blob of foundation on the sponge which sinks in and also it's harder to distribute from dabbing off a small blob.

Far easier is a Kabuki brush. I have flat head one by Sigma. For that, I would apply from foundation off the back of my hand. Instead of painting the foundation up and down, buff gently in circles all over your faces. Don't do it hard, but don't be too timid or delicate either! Just brush all over until everywhere is covered evenly. You can go back to apply areas that might need a bit more coverage such as the chin and cheeks. The coverage a Kabuki brush gives is very good and I personally find there's less waste than with a sponge.

If you have undereye circles, you can apply some liquid concealer under your eyes and then use the same brush to blend in. (just close one eye at a time!) Or for this, the sponge is pretty good for precise areas. You would do this just after applying foundation.

Hope this helps!

TeethDrama Tue 17-Jan-17 17:20:54

PS if you have moisturised and primed face, or at least well moisturised, I wouldn't dampen as all the water does is water the foundation down. Dampening doesn't work that well with oil-based foundations either, I mean it'll look fine but it won't last/blend as well.

daffodilssoon Tue 17-Jan-17 17:43:22

Fantastic advice, thank you Teeth, I'll try the dot, smudge, blend technique.
I think I might've had the sponge too damp as it was just rubbing off.

If it doesn't work I'll be back to ask you more about your brush. I did try a brush at one time but got a face full of brush strokesblush

TeethDrama Tue 17-Jan-17 22:47:40

That's ok daffodil smile

I used to get brush strokes with a normal foundation brush (as in the ones which look like a big paintbrush) but a flat-head kabuki brush (google it) is very densely packed soft hairs which you buff the foundation on with (a bit like the job a shaving brush does). The hairs are packed so tight and they are so soft, they can't leave brush strokes as such.

But if you feel comfortable with a sponge, they are very good!

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