Talk

Advanced search

Let's talk taboo topics with Modibodi - £300 voucher + £100 Modibodi voucher to be won

(289 Posts)
JustineBMumsnet (MNHQ) Sun 30-Jun-19 14:54:22

There are many topics that are traditionally considered taboo - and whether that’s discussing your period, the menopause, money whether you have it or not, or topics like incontience or sex, talking about taboo topics can sometimes be helpful, and so Modibodi would like to hear about the ways you talk about taboo topics with your friends and family.

Here’s what Modibodi has to say: “Modibodi™ is modern, protective apparel, created for real women. real bodies. real leaks! We cater to give all bodies more confidence and comfort, and a more sustainable solution to disposable hygiene. Our founder and CEO, Kristy Chong, spent almost two years working scientists and designers, developing, and testing the patented Modifier Technology™ that makes up the super stylish leak-proof knickers into the Modibodi collection. We have a UK team and warehouse, with same day dispatch, so you can get your Modibodi quickly! Modibodi also gives back to women in need through their Give A Pair program.”

“Modibodi believes that making a positive impact should be as easy as changing the undies we wear and now your swimwear too. Along with our sister brand RED, which is period proof protective undies for tweens and teens, we want all women and young girls to feel confident and be leak free. If you don’t believe us, try them for yourself with a 30-day free trial.
Modibodi offers FREE shipping in the UK and Northern Ireland, and are currently offering Mumsnet users 12% off their first order with the code ‘mumstaboo’ on their site. Offer excludes packs, gift cards and sale items.”

How would you talk to your daughter about her period? Or educate your son on what happens to women during menstruation? Are continence or ‘leak’ issues something you feel like you can’t mention, or are there topics that you’d be too embarrassed to speak about outside of a doctors office? Do you find it difficult to talk about money with others, out of fear they’ll feel judged, or that they’ll judge you? Perhaps there’s some people in your life you’d talk about anything with, regardless of how taboo the topic?

However you discuss topics that are traditionally taboo, share a comment below to be entered into a prize draw where one MNer will win a £300 voucher for the store of their choice (from a list) and one MNer will win a £100 Modibodi voucher.

Thanks and good luck!

MNHQ

Insight Terms and Conditions apply

MotherForkinShirtBalls Mon 01-Jul-19 07:55:52

Thanks for using the words women and girls in your post here and recognising our biology.

I had awful periods as a teen and was too embarrassed to talk to my mum about them. I'm trying to be much more direct and open with my dc so even though I'm on occasion squirming inside they, especially dd, don't have any hang ups or reservations. I'd have found the period pans so incredibly reassuring when I was at school. I'm glad they are an option for teenagers now.

That said, both dc are currently obsessed with death. An entirely different taboo.

VictoriaBun Mon 01-Jul-19 08:00:35

When I had a period I never hid the fact from my daughter's when they came to the loo with me. They started noticing around age 3 , just by asking questions like ' Whats that ?' I'd answer just my period. Then the questions might have moved onto why do you have them? I'd answer it's something girls have when they grow up. So periods have never been a taboo in our house.
I'm a confident person when discussing bodily issues and don't have problems with anyone in that respect.
I don't discuss personal finances with anyone accept my dh.

jacqui5366 Mon 01-Jul-19 08:08:53

How would you talk to your daughter about her period? Or educate your son on what happens to women during menstruation?

I intend to talk to my son about menstruation when he 8 or 9 (depending on his understanding or whether he is ready emotionally to hear about this)

Are continence or ‘leak’ issues something you feel like you can’t mention, or are there topics that you’d be too embarrassed to speak about outside of a doctors office?

Leak issues are something I would talk about with my friends, I am not too embarrassed, I have a very heavy flow on day 2 and 3 and have 'leak worry' on those days, so have tampons and pads on those days.

Do you find it difficult to talk about money with others, out of fear they’ll feel judged, or that they’ll judge you?

It's private, and personal to me, I don't ask others and don't expect them to ask me.

Perhaps there’s some people in your life you’d talk about anything with, regardless of how taboo the topic?

My sister - I can talk to her about anything . - and vice versa

Belmo Mon 01-Jul-19 08:14:47

I’ve been totally open with my son and my daughter about periods since they were tiny - I really don’t want them to think it’s something embarrassing to talk about (unlike my dh - he is ridiculous about it, I don’t think he can even bare to say the word!)

fedupntired Mon 01-Jul-19 08:26:03

Good to see. We are very open in our family, except for my dd who hates anything biological!!!

bellinisurge Mon 01-Jul-19 08:36:30

My dd has just started her periods. We talked about it in advance and she only uses reusables- unless there is an emergency. I saved up and bought her a week's worth of modibodi knickers for school. I have bought but also make her some cloth pads - she decides what they look like; there are loads of fab patterns out there and some are free. We have reused some clothes that are too small for her too. Or I buy fat quarters. Or we look in the children's section of charity shops for funky cottons.

Gazelda Mon 01-Jul-19 09:08:18

I feel a tiny bit uncomfortable talking about periods to people I'm not very close to. But found myself in a situation recently where I needed to discuss menstruation while a 10yo boy was present.
I was delighted to notice that he wasn't uncomfortable, mildly interested maybe but not blushing or rapt with curiosity. A very healthy attitude and I commend his parents.
With my DD, I talk openly, factually and truthfully. It's a fact of life but sometimes not pleasant.
Taboo subjects when I was growing up was my mother's death. I'm determined that this will not be a taboo topic for my daughter.

BristolMum96 Mon 01-Jul-19 09:13:55

We are a fairly open family but I also don't see the need to discuss personal things with all and sundry.

JanuarySun Mon 01-Jul-19 09:16:24

I feel really awkward talking about periods. Intellectually I know it's perfectly normal and natural, but I still cringe.

JC4PMPLZ Mon 01-Jul-19 10:06:55

I try not to let anything be taboo. We discuss everything, but in factual ways and try to keep it calm and unfrightening. Where things, like death, are scary, we talk of how it is part of a cycle of life.

Blazedout Mon 01-Jul-19 10:23:16

My ds's ages 11, 8 and 4 all know that once a month I have a period and they know when as my box of sanitary goodies moves to the bathroom. When the box first came out they asked questions so I answered them, I have never hid anything and my four year old giggles when I wear a 'nappy for grown ups'

APurpleSquirrel Mon 01-Jul-19 10:23:43

I talk to my friends more about periods, i think because we're all becoming more conscious of the plastic/waste issues surrounding it.
I also talk to my husband.
I've already started talking to my daughter about it a bit (she's 4) when she's asked questions about sanitary products in the house. I'll also tell my son when he's older so that he understands.
I think it can be uncomfortable, but its a normal biological function of our bodies and needs to be talked about more openly.

cupoftea84 Mon 01-Jul-19 10:56:18

Periods were a taboo subject when I grew up. I wish it'd been easier to say something when mine started.
As a result of not having sanitary products I had a super embarrassing leak that made me fear them for years. I still find it stressful worrying about leaks.
I intend to be much more open with my child. Make it a non issue.

Batsypatsy Mon 01-Jul-19 11:20:02

I'm an only child and my mum was embarrassed talking about anything to do with the body. It made me feel very awkward all my life and has definitely affected relationships. I was determined my children wouldn't feel like that and have always talked openly to them about anything and everything, although I found it incredibly difficult - but I feel it was good for me too. Consequently my now mostly adult children come to talk to me about everything, my youngest was able to come out to me etc. I feel very strongly about this as it had such an effect on all my life. I've lived abroad in Europe and it seems many British are very repressed compares to many Europeans - a generalisation I know but it seems that way ime.

Noeuf Mon 01-Jul-19 11:30:41

I have three boys. I keep san pro in the bathroom and downstairs loo cabinets and they know about periods because I've always explained it - they've sometimes glimpsed blood in the loo or a pad somewhere. I'm not easily embarrassed by explaining how bodies work - we've covered sex, masturbation, periods, nose picking, ear wax, threadworms etc etc in our time. It's harder to talk drugs and alcohol tbh.

differentnameforthis Mon 01-Jul-19 13:04:20

My dd is 10, she has autism and severe sensory issues. She recently started her period. I bought a pair of Modibodis thinking they would help with her sensory issues.

She cannot not wear them. The seams are far too bulky and irritate her too much. Please look into this.

Otherwise, she knew all about what was happening to her, we talk freely an openly about periods, what it is to be a woman and why we have periods. It was especially important to me as no one really talked to me about it.

user1496959500 Mon 01-Jul-19 13:39:30

I can talk about periods more easily than I can about sex - periods is biology and you have little control over how heavy or regular they are (other than meds!) - sex is more down to you and I feel more stigma attached to good / bad sex lives as it’s largely down to the people involved rather than external forces like periods. I discuss different products and contraception options with friends, especially with drive for reusable stuff in the rest of life. My toddler DS thinks I use a “plug” for my mooncup and a “nappy” when I use pads, so will have some way to go when talking about it with him in the future!

FreshAprilStart Mon 01-Jul-19 14:04:58

I am absolutely discussing periods with my teenage daughter, and also my own menopause. Very open about this and her father is too, though not intrusive. Think this is helped hugely, and reflective of, current society attitudes.

Where the difficulty comes is with urine leakage. This shows quite a different impact in terms of openness and honest discussions. This is much more taboo and shameful and I tend to find anonymous places like MN is the place for a real conversation.

MargoLovebutter Mon 01-Jul-19 14:14:29

My DC are nearly grown up now, but I tried to talk to them about how our bodies work in an age sensitive, open way. We chat about most things without embarrassment, although given I grew up in a very repressed household, it isn't always easy for me. Both my DS and my DD have a much more open attitude and will happily chat about bodily functions in a way that I certainly never could.

I am so thankful for the internet, because I can chat happily about everything on here, where I'd still find a face to face conversation with anyone other than my DC, about everything that leaks excruciating.

ohdannyboy Mon 01-Jul-19 14:20:30

When I was at school, periods were taboo - not discussed, and embarrassing, thankfully things have moved on, and we are a much more open and less embarrassed about them. I can vividly remember putting rolled up toilet paper in my underwear when my tampon leaked, and the horrible feeling of using a pad how your period felt, so leakage was and still is a fear of mine.
So when my DS asked what my tampons were for in the bathroom cupboard, I told him in a way he would understand. He is not embarrassed and hopefully will empathise with his female peers.

Montydoo Mon 01-Jul-19 14:27:25

How would you talk to your daughter about her period? Or educate your son on what happens to women during menstruation?

As girls start their periods at an earlier age (or seem to from when I was at school). I think 8 or 9 - and have a brief chat about a period - but not too graphic.

Are continence or ‘leak’ issues something you feel like you can’t mention, or are there topics that you’d be too embarrassed to speak about outside of a doctors office?

I used to be very embarrassed about discussing leakage, but after having children - will discuss it with any health professional, my friends, partner and some work colleagues.

Do you find it difficult to talk about money with others, out of fear they’ll feel judged, or that they’ll judge you? Perhaps there’s some people in your life you’d talk about anything with, regardless of how taboo the topic?

I will only discuss my finances (lack of) and tax credit claims with my DH who looks after the finances - I will discuss pretty much anything with him.

Whathappenedtothelego Mon 01-Jul-19 15:07:09

I have friends that I can discuss anything with.
Some things are private, you don't need to talk about them with everyone- but it's good to have someone you can talk with.
I hope my daughter will be able to talk about periods etc with a friend or friends, as well as with me.

ButterflyOfFreedom Mon 01-Jul-19 15:31:01

We are quite open about discussing anything & everything in our house. Recent topics have included various body parts, cancer and death! I try to be honest without giving unnecessary detail which the D.C. may become worried or scared about or simply that they wouldn't understand.
I feel.its important to keep the communication channels open though and hope they can ask anything they want to.

Fumnudge Mon 01-Jul-19 15:54:33

Most of my generation found our first few periods tough as our mums just didn't discuss it, we vaguely knew from school but it was thoroughly embarrassing.
I've been open in my use of san pros (like a mum ever gets to have the bathroom door locked anyway hmm) so this has promoted open discussions. Now my eldest is 11 and, although still finds it scary, is prepared and knowledgeable.
I'm definitely going to buy her period pants and for myself too. I'm a heavy bleeder and would love the security of a tampon gush being contained by pants, and for my daughter it would just take so much anxiety away.
First time I've ever been excited about a period grin

Join the discussion

Registering is free, quick, and means you can join in the discussion, watch threads, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Get started »