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What does a multi-agency meeting do?

(9 Posts)
Queenofthestress Sat 10-Feb-18 20:07:26

I'm a bit confused, I'm based in NE Lincs school requested the early years officer from the hospital to come observe DS (4) He has a full diagnosis of GDD and functions at the age of 2.5 .
Strategies were suggested and implemented in an IEP, but now he's going into full time in September school have requested a multi agency meeting.
I have no idea what a multi - agency meeting is or what the outcomes are, is there anyone that can explain?

BackforGood Sat 10-Feb-18 23:50:25

Well, I'm not in NE Lincs., but a multi agency meeting anywhere will be 'what it says on the tin'..... a meeting at which everybody in the Team Around the Child (often just called 'TAC') is invited to.
It is absolutely in the spirit of Early Support, on which a lot of the legislation in the 2014 SEN/D Code of Practice / Children and Families Bill is based. The idea being that 'Education', 'Health', and {where applicable} 'Care' all talk to each other and the parents / family of the child aren't expected to be explaining things separately to different people who might be supporting or assessing one area of the child's life.

Where I live / work, a 'TAC' (or multi agency) meeting would realistically only be called if it was felt that the time had come to request a Statutory Assessment for an EHC Plan.
In theory, it would be a nice idea if it were to happen on a regular basis before that, but, resources being what they are.....

So, given the limited information about your dc, obviously I am only guessing, but my guess would be that is the next step - or 'the outcome', if you will - that they will be requesting an EHC Assessment for him.
That said, surely this has been discussed with you first ?

Queenofthestress Sun 11-Feb-18 06:12:17

I know school want an ECHP otherwise they're not going to be able to cope with his needs when he goes up to full time but no ones actually explained what goes on in the meeting at the end of the play sessions

BackforGood Sun 11-Feb-18 17:05:56

Oh, right. Well I can tell you what happens where I work - maybe others can say if it is the same of different in different parts of the country.

Prior to the meeting, everyone involved - the 'TAC' (Team Around the Child) is asked to provide as much up to date, factual information about the child as they can, according to their speciality (so a SaLT would obviously be commenting on the Speech and Language, and a physio on their gross motor skills and physical developments, and so on). 'Education' would be the Nursery or school they attend.
Sometimes the Parents are asked to fill in a one page profile "My Story" before the meeting, and sometimes they are completed at the meeting.
The meeting is then to bring all these reports together, and read through them, and (if not done previously to write up the Parents' perspective - or young person for an older child), and to check that they present a true and accurate picture of the child. Technically it is to make the decision to put a formal request in to the Local Authority, to ask them to assess the child. In reality, they only hold the meeting if that is what is needed.
The local authority panel, obviously don't know your child, so the information this meeting put together, is what they make their judgement on, so it is important to make sure all the information is there.
Before the meeting (if you haven't already been asked for your views) it makes sense for you to write down anything that might be relevant..... from pregnancy / birth history, to when you first had concerns...... from any adjustments you make for your child that others might not have to make for theirs (this might be about dietary needs or seeming fussiness, it might be about sleep patterns, it might be about you avoiding public toilets because f the noise of hand driers, it might be about people outside the family not being able to understand speech, it might be about only being interested in one thing, it might be about anything. Most probably a list of things, but give it some thought beforehand because families have sometimes become so used to the adjustments, they don't really think about them any more.
Where possible, try to quantify things - so, instead of saying {just as an example} 'He's a poor sleeper', try to say 'We put lights out at 7.30, then he wakes at 11, 1, and 3,30, but only for 5 - 10 mins each time', or whatever the pattern. Instead of 'he's a fussy eater', say 'He will only eat foods that are beige coloured, and nothing that has been touching another food', and so forth.
When you are in a meeting, it can be easy to forget things, hence me thinking it makes sense to make a few notes beforehand.

They will also ask you about your hopes and aspirations....... what would you like him to be able to do in 2 years time ? etc., so worth thinking about that (the Chairman of the meeting will guide you, don't worry, but it is nice to know what you will be asked before a meeting sometimes smile

Ask away if there is anything else you need to know. There are loads of helpful posters on MN.

Queenofthestress Sun 11-Feb-18 19:51:10

In 2 years time I'd like him to be able to dress himself and use the loo lol still not potty trained, it's a nightmare

BackforGood Sun 11-Feb-18 20:10:04

I work in Early years, and that is a very, very common thing for parents to put down smile
It also gives the panel a better idea of 'where he is' - if you are hoping that your 4 yr old might be able to be toilet trained in 2 years time, and to be able to dress himself, then that gives them a good idea of where is is now, and the rate of progress people expect. It's really helpful.

Queenofthestress Sun 11-Feb-18 20:59:24

Near enough all of the professionals at the meeting have been involved since he was 10 months or for the past two years in terms of schooling

BackforGood Sun 11-Feb-18 23:15:03

Yes, but it isn't the professionals that know him that sit on the panel. That is why they have the TAC (or multi agency) meeting. It is to put down all the information about him, which then goes to panel.

Queenofthestress Sun 11-Feb-18 23:41:14

Ahhh, I forgot the pead might not be there, probably not, I always see a new one each time
DP thinks the idea of starting a list ready for the meeting is brilliant, thank you! Its at the end of March so plenty of time to think about it

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