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Dyslexia question

(4 Posts)
Throgglesprocket Thu 07-Dec-17 13:00:21

My DD (14) has had an assessment at school and I am confused as the SENCO has said:

"has a difficulty, not a special educational need"

What on earth is the difference?!!! Her CTOPP2 scores were generally all well-below average, although WRAT and DASH were all average.

I feel as though we are battling to get any support for our DD - we just had a meeting today, and basically we were told that we had to tell DD to go and find out what works best for her. I feel like they're washing their hands of her as academically she's achieving okay, so they probably don't feel the need to work hard for her.

Has anyone else had this experience at all?

Tainbri Sun 28-Jan-18 17:14:05

You could seek more in depth and professional advice from someone such as an educational psychologist, who would give you much more detail and suggest strategies that might help. A special education need is only when they really are struggling and intervention is required just to access the curriculum rather than just finding things tough, so without knowing the exact scores it's hard to comment on what they could or should be doing.

chattycathy1 Tue 06-Feb-18 17:58:54

We would call dyslexia, for example, a specific learning difficulty - SpLd(dyslexia), as opposed to an SEN which could be a range of difficulties contributing to a Special Educational Need (SEN)
We would teach pupils strategies to overcome her difficulties as well as using any ICT which could help access the curriculum. Often pupils have found their own strategies by the time they reach your daughter’s age.

Throgglesprocket Wed 07-Feb-18 16:34:20

The school seem to be unwilling to help teach strategies, leaving it up to her to find her own way which is less than helpful.

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