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Should I try and do more ms stuff with dd?

(6 Posts)
Blossomhill Wed 27-Jul-05 21:37:34

I am not sure if I am helping dd by taking her to the sn kids kingdom, swimming, gymnastics that kind of thing. As dd can do everything other children do but struggles with communication I am not sure if I should just encourage more ms or not.
I do find the sn activities quieter which is good for dd but do wonder if I am wrapping her in cotton wool too much and now need to give her more everyday life exposure.
Just wondered how everyone else was on this. Do you tend to try and do ms or go for the sn alternative?
I think a lot of the reason I do it is that it's more relaxing. I mean last week at sn swimming I turned round and dd was naked . No one batted an eyelid but if it was ms it would have been different.
I hope I am making sense

coppertop Wed 27-Jul-05 21:51:05

There's not much around here aimed specifically at children with SN so I tend to take ds1 and ds2 to m/s things. The times when I take them to ASD/SN things I do find that it's more relaxing for me though. Today both boys went to a m/s kids crafts group. They both enjoyed it but I found myself having to supervise them fairly closely in case something went wrong. When they went to an SN evening the week before it was much less stressful and I was happy to let them both out of my sight.

I think you have to think about what works best for you as well as for dd. If m/s things will leave you permanently on edge wondering whether dd will do something then it really won't be an enjoyable time IMHO.

Blossomhill Thu 28-Jul-05 12:22:30

We have it the other way coppertop in that there is always a sn alternative!

A lot of the time it is easier as dd does display some inappropriate/challenging behaviour at times!

Dingle Thu 28-Jul-05 15:00:56

I don't feel I have many alternatives locally. So although we don't do much ATM, I should imagine as time goes on, we will get Amelia involved with more and more ms activities. If they don't work out, then I will have to source out sn activities, but I think we are very limited here.

I admit that I am trying to steer Amelia away from SN environments. Even her nursery, I feel her development has come on so much since regular attendance at ms nursery. I also believe it must be very confusing for Amelia to have one set of rules for sn nursery and another completely different set of rules at ms!

I feel she has a lot of behavioural issues and although I feel very guilty about it, I do worry that by intense mixing with other children who have severe behavioural, communication and social issue, she must be getting a very mixed picture of what is right or wrong! Does that make any sense??

Amelia is such a mimic, and she will copy others behaviour, whether good or bad. So I am hoping that by reducing the amount of time at sn nursery, she will start to have a clearer picture of what is expected of her.

Feeling very mixed up and emotional ATM, I hope by saying this I don't offend anyone!

sylvm Fri 29-Jul-05 10:48:43

I do find the sn playscheme my dd attends wonderful. The helpers are brilliant with the kids and because there's such a high staff/child ratio they can spend a lot of time with them which my dd loves. She's been going to a Church Holiday Club this week for a couple of hours each morning. I know she's enjoyed it but she's also got very overwhelmed, I think by the noise. Most days, when I've picked her up, they've been having a final sing with loud instruments, all very jolly, but yesterday dd was sat in a corner with her jacket over her head! The volunteers have been brill with her though and she has apparently participated in most things. I do feel happier with the SN playscheme tho' and wish there were more things like it around here, may be afterschool, cos she's reached the age where she could manage a bit more after school.

RnB Fri 29-Jul-05 11:23:43

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