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HFA/ASD symptoms or not? Help please.

(6 Posts)
othermother Thu 11-Jun-09 23:33:46

Ds (5) was recently dx with HFA. Still not had anything in writing but the paed was adament that it was that, and has referred him to SALT and a more local paed....appointments in next few weeks.

Now, do these symptoms/behaviours sound like HFA to you?

He has become obsessed with his Grandad Tom who died when ds was just a baby. He keeps getting books on WW2 from the library to see if he can find pictures of him, even though I assure him that he won't be in any of the books. He "sees" grandad Tom at the park, in clouds, in shadows. He also keeps telling me about when he was a tudor and a roman and an anglo saxon and about how his life was then.

He's also started asking me if things on telly are real life or not, as though he cannot tell the difference between reality and cartoon characters.

Another thing he's started doing is when i've put his coat/pants/shoes on, asking me about 5 minutes afterwards in a panic, "mum, who put this on me?" and I have to reassure him that it was me.

None of the books I've read on autism say anything about these sorts of behaviours, and I'm becoming rather confused. His licking things is getting worse, his having to touch things etc and his meltdowns are just as bad, but I think these things ARE autism related.

I'm beginning to wonder though if he has something else going on. Any wise words please?

lingle Fri 12-Jun-09 09:10:45

bump.

coppertop Fri 12-Jun-09 10:44:47

"He also keeps telling me about when he was a tudor and a roman and an anglo saxon and about how his life was then."

This bit reminded me a little of my ds2 (6yrs and with AS). He doesn't do this so much now but often used to say things like "You know before I was a baby, back when I was a grown-up..." and then talk about something that had apparently happened to him. He does seem to remember things that happened when he was a baby so it was a bit spooky at the time.

"Another thing he's started doing is when i've put his coat/pants/shoes on, asking me about 5 minutes afterwards in a panic, "mum, who put this on me?" and I have to reassure him that it was me."

My two (particularly my eldest) seem to zone out sometimes. They still go through the motions of what they are doing but it's obvious that their minds are elsewhere. When they snap out of it again they seem to be surprised by whatever it is they had been doing as it was done almost subconsciously, if that makes sense.

Ds2 is definitely still learning about the difference between reality and cartoons etc. He has a tendency to mix them up and then throw in some imagination for good measure. It means he comes out with things like "At school today Mrs X told John off for being silly. Then a big black cloud appeared over her head and lightning came out from her fingers."

The bit about John being told off is fairly likely. The rest is a mixture of things he's seen on cartoons and also his imagination.

othermother Fri 12-Jun-09 10:55:49

Thanks, that's kind of reassuring that your ds is similar. I was beginning to panic he was becoming psychotic. Last night he was showing me the lights in the clouds that kept going on and off, but there weren't any lights. Also, his teacher mentioned to me that Tom sometimes "zones out", so that could explain that one. Thanks.

magso Fri 12-Jun-09 11:56:27

My son intersperses reality and pretend too. I presumed this is because he does not understand time and complex issues like imagining are new to him. I suspect he does not have the complexity of language to express his thoughts as I would (or able to make the distinction between thoughts, hopes and real past observations!

He also has an uncomfortable interest in the aunty (my dtsis) he never knew (died before he was born). He does not have the social awareness to say appropriate things - and more specifically know what not to say!

Ds is 9 with LD and ASD.
I see these differences in imagination as part of his autism.
Ds zones out ( he is very single channelled so will simply not hear if he is busy) but is not troubled by what he is missing!

lingle Sun 14-Jun-09 11:23:46

Have just been reading (in Greenspan where else?) that these problems are very common in children who have overcome many of the more basic challenges in kids with SN.

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