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DS Has been referred - also on Behaviour/Development Thread.

(17 Posts)
JAKEJEM Mon 09-May-05 22:33:18

My DS aged nearly 3 has finally been referred to the child development clinic by our HV. She has said that he has "sensory" issues which I strongly agree with, I am so worried that he may be on the autistic spectrum. He has many issues - late speech (although now he has started talking he is now saying new words daily) but his most worrying symptoms are that he is so oversensitive about everything. I cannot ever leave him, even nipping to the loo he screams and cries hysterically, we have tried 2 different nurserys, each one has called us in and said he is just not ready to be left (after weeks of trying he just screams at the door for 2 hours for mummy) He is scared of birds/ducks/dogs and hides behind me if a stranger even says hello to him. He also has a problem with any types of lumpy food. Saying all this, whenever he is with mummy/daddy and baby sister he is a happy, loving, normal little boy, I am so upset/worried and just wondered if anyone else had been through ANYTHING like this, or am I the only one in the world!!!!!!!!

RTKangaMummy Mon 09-May-05 22:39:37

DEFFO BRILL well done it took me ages to work out how to connect two threads up

Hopefully somone will be along to help

Socci Mon 09-May-05 22:40:37

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JAKEJEM Mon 09-May-05 22:44:30

Cheers Kanga and Socci, I am just so confused, one minute I think he is just very very highly senstive, cause he does "normal" things, eg points at things, plays with other children, eye contact etc, then the next minute someone trys to hug him or say hello and he just goes absolutley mad!!!! I really wish that the assessment would hurry up, another mum at playschool saw what happened today (DS ran to me crying cause other boy tried to grab him) and said my son was exactly the same (he is autistic) and that was it, tears came out (and months of worry)!!!!

Socci Mon 09-May-05 22:46:22

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Socci Mon 09-May-05 22:49:16

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JAKEJEM Mon 09-May-05 22:51:56

Hi Socci, still awaiting appointment to come through, was sent from HV last week, I just cannot find his symptoms on any thread, whether it be autism or not, the autism ones say with social behaviour that the children are aloof, could this be also hysterical>? How did you feel when your DD was diagnosed (silly question) but I just want to help my little man.

JAKEJEM Mon 09-May-05 22:56:02

Well, off to bed now, thanks for listening, hope to get some more advice tomorrow

louismama Tue 10-May-05 01:23:24

Hi just wanted to say your definately not alone im right there with you my ds is 23months and i suspect he may be asd too i have an apponitment for a preliminary assessment for 26th may but the waiting list for full assessment at cdc 12months!! Its terrifying the thought of not getting any help till then when you want to do everything possible yesterday for your little one. All i have to say really is try to pace yourself and not burn out with worry as its a long haul. Thoughts and hugs to you though XX

Davros Tue 10-May-05 09:20:05

He sounds interesting Jakejem. Not much help I know! But getting new words and his ability to behave normally in a secure setting and with familiar people sounds good. I don't know what can be done about the extreme sensory issues but I'm sure something can. When is your appt?

Saker Tue 10-May-05 14:03:55

In the absence of Jimjams who usually recommends this - I will recommend the book "The Out of Sync Child" by Carol Stock Kranowitz which is all about sensory issues. I am reading it at present and have found it interesting and useful. She makes quite a lot of suggestions for helping with sensory issues. You can probably get it from the library.

coppertop Tue 10-May-05 14:25:36

Hi Jakejem.

I've been through the assessment process with both of my boys (now 2yrs and 4yrs old). Both have sensory problems but there is a lot that can be done to help. Getting the referral to the CDC is a really positive thing as an assessment will give you a good idea of what (if anything) help your ds needs.

Socci Tue 10-May-05 18:37:42

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JAKEJEM Tue 10-May-05 20:43:52

Thanks for all your messages guys, it has helped me so much by actually speaking about what is going and getting such thoughtful replies. Had HV around today to let us know that DS appt will be asap. Had another mixed day with him, he played great with other children and mums and tots and then totally freaked out tonight when I gave him some new PJ's that I bought specially for him The main question I am trying to find the answer to is that could my DS have sensory issues (Hypersensitive) without having autism or do the two come hand in hand (so to speak). Thanks again for support - very much needed and appreciated.!!

Davros Wed 11-May-05 08:48:34

Hmm, I don't see why he couldn't have sensory issues without ASD. But I don't know...... Glad to hear things are moving along though.

singersgirl Wed 11-May-05 10:48:40

Hi, Jakejem, I don't know much about this, but as my son had/has some minor sensory issues I have done a bit of surfing. There is a board on Parentcenter.com called something like "Kids with sensory integration dysfunction" and from what I recall, most of those children had sensory issues without autism - it's all very US biased though. I'm no good at links, I'm afraid, but if you try the Parentcenter Bulletin Board links and then Boards A-Z you should find it - it's under K for "Kids", unhelpfully. Hope this might help.

Saker Wed 11-May-05 12:49:31

Jakejem

As I understand it you can have sensory issues by themselves and it's called sensory integration dysfunction. You can also have sensory issues with ASD, dyspraxia, language difficulty and also with some things like fragile X. I am not saying your child has any of these things just that is the general scope as I understand it.

HTH

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