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anyone have an ASD child who can't be alone?

(5 Posts)
iwearflairs Thu 11-Sep-08 22:01:07

except for occasions (about 30 mins daily) when he becomes absorbed in a game he is interested in, DS wants to talk and play games with me ALL DAY? Did I say ALL day? Is this ASD or is it 4 year olds?

I set the timer for 10 mins and set him a task of something he can do quite easily or say we are going to have quiet time for 10 mins but we rarely get to 5.

Anyone know more about why he needs to do this than me (not hard)?

silverfrog Fri 12-Sep-08 07:49:32

yep, dd1 pesters all day for chat/games/stories. I try to see it as great that she wants me that involved, form a social point of view, but it is incredibly wearing at the same time.

If I do manage to get her settled with a book/building blocks etc, then it is usually after a huge fuss, and leaves me feeling guilty for rebuffing her attempts at being social. <sigh>

To be fair to dd, she wouldn't understand the concept of 10 minutes peace (severe language delay) but there are things she can do without my input if she would only allow it. On bad days, she still wants hand-over-hand supprt for toys like shape sorters which she has been successfully completing for a few years!

sarah293 Fri 12-Sep-08 08:06:50

Message withdrawn

silverfrog Fri 12-Sep-08 08:12:33

really? oh, that is reassuring. with dd1 being my oldest, I find it really hard to separate what might be "normal" and what is ASD.

So, in 2 years time dd2 will be doing exactly the same? <considers running for the hills while I still have a chance>

dd2 has hit the "what's that" stage of pointing randomly, and continually, and I was just saying to dh last night that I've been waiting for years for dd1 to start asking "why", and will crack open the champagne when she does, but am NOT loooking forward to dd2 getting there grin

sarah293 Fri 12-Sep-08 08:26:17

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