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When does distraction become a problem?

(15 Posts)
PurpleMinionMummy Wed 18-Oct-17 20:32:30

My dd (yr 4) had parents evening tonight.

Her teacher commented that she is easily distracted, eyes often wondering off to watch something else, is easily distracted by chatting and is often the instigator of said chat. But that when she's focused she produces great work and has a lot of potential.

DD often has to check what she needs to be doing. The teacher feels this is because she is missing some of the instructions given, they often go to her soon after starting the activity to ensure she's on the right track.

It was also mentioned that dd sometimes thinks she knows better than the teacher (cringe!)

Last year at parents evening in yr 3 we were told the same about her missing instructions, although that teacher said she was often 'daydreaming' and missing things. The teacher then went on maternity leave and the replacement teacher said it was no longer a problem, but clearly it seems it is.

I was not surprised to hear any of this, Dd is hard work. She is difficult to do homework with as I often have to bring her attention back to the task in hand. She's fidgety, extremely argumentative and generally quite explosive. Lots of people comment on how talkative she is (we get a running commentary on everything she's doing if she has nothing else to talk about) and she interrupts a lot. She often forgets/loses things and often appears to not listen as she won't respond. She also finds it hard to complete a task, I can send her to do something and she'll come back having not done so as she's forgotten/got distracted on the way, a list of tasks - do your teeth, wash your face, brush your hair stands no hope.

There is autism and spd in the family. I have wondered if she has adhd in the past but I also wonder if it could be sensory processing issues. I don't know much about autism in girls but obviously it's in my mind because of her dad. Do you think I should ask for a referral or just wait and see how things go as she gets older?

40yearsyoung Thu 19-Oct-17 21:34:36

Hi PurpleMinionMummy,
No words of advice but hoping someone more knowledgeable can step in. I came on here searching for info and could have written this exact post about my DS. Am in exactly the same situation and at a loss as to what to do next.

Tissie Fri 20-Oct-17 00:03:52

I would ask for an educational psychologist full assessment but you might not get it as schools generally have far less access now than they used to. Another route to go down is to ask your GP for a referral to speech and language (SALT). A full assessment from a SAL therapist will also highlight issues to do with short term memory and processing problems.
It sounds to me as if your daughter has issues with processing language and short term memory which would explain a lot of what you have said. If access to SALT seems exceptionally slow or not happening at all consider asking for names of private therapists (many who work for the NHS also do private work) and paying for an assessment yourself. Best of luck.

zzzzz Fri 20-Oct-17 14:52:13

I have a similar chap and what has worked wonders for us is caffeine shock. I’m not sure why that’s surprising because dh and I both find it helps when we are working hard. Caffeine increases (amplifies?) executive function. Ds is totally transformed focus wise by a large cup of tea shock

Sorry not glam or dramatic and I’m sure not what you were looking for but it’s what works for him.

Allthewaves Sat 21-Oct-17 21:34:58

You need her properly assessed but screams adhd to me.

Allthewaves Sat 21-Oct-17 21:37:43

I was not surprised to hear any of this, Dd is hard work. She is difficult to do homework with as I often have to bring her attention back to the task in hand. She's fidgety, extremely argumentative and generally quite explosive. Lots of people comment on how talkative she is (we get a running commentary on everything she's doing if she has nothing else to talk about) and she interrupts a lot. She often forgets/loses things and often appears to not listen as she won't respond. She also finds it hard to complete a task, I can send her to do something and she'll come back having not done so as she's forgotten/got distracted on the way, a list of tasks - do your teeth, wash your face, brush your hair stands no hope.

You describe my 9 year old to a T - he is diagnosed adhd and on medication. He's incredibly hard work on his none med days.

PurpleMinionMummy Sat 21-Oct-17 22:17:48

Caffeine? Interesting. It would very interesting if it didn't work the desired way lol.

I think she needs assessing too. Been there before with another dc (not for adhd) and found some people so dismissive I don't fancy facing it all again. At least school see some of it though which will no doubt help a lot.

Banjax Sat 21-Oct-17 22:47:09

I have the same problem with my 7yo. My younger boy is probably autistic and apparent;ly there is an overlap. I went to the doc last year but its actually worse and am hgoing agai next week.

Allthewaves Sun 22-Oct-17 00:44:48

undiagnosed adhd suffers often self medicate with caffeine, it's not great as short acting and not as effective as formal medication

Allthewaves Sun 22-Oct-17 00:47:10

There's qb computer rest for adhd. Iv got dc with asd and one with adhd. Adhd diagnosis was much simpler and straight forward

zzzzz Sun 22-Oct-17 07:37:52

it's not great as short acting and not as effective as formal medication
You see I would argue with that. For ds it definitely IS a great solution (at least at the moment), it’s readily available, he’s sensible so doesn’t over use, it’s unremarkable to peers, it’s effects are short lived so not a sledgehammer to crack a nut. For us it’s really helped. The real negative is that it sometimes stops having any effect at all for a few days which is tedious but we cope.

Banjax Sun 22-Oct-17 07:53:36

I talked to my husband about giving my son a small cup of coffee (he's not that big into tea) before doing homework and he's dead against it. If it's effective, I'll ask him again. I did not do nearly so well as I should have at school because I couldnt concentrate in class or in exams. I don't want this to happen to my son, and he's sitting the 11+ in two years, which means I need to get him sorted asap. Right now im not sure he'd pass tbh and he's bright.

zzzzz Sun 22-Oct-17 08:03:11

I’d try it in the morning before school and see if he feels any better. Stimulants like caffeine are what adhd meds’ are, so I’m not sure why your dh is more worried about a hot beverage than a much stronger prescription drug? What’s the plan if meds don’t help, re the 11+?

Banjax Sun 22-Oct-17 08:10:09

well, my husband simply ignores that there might be a problem! Our other son is alsmost certainly autistic and it took him 2 years to get on board. it's not that he doesnt listen, he just thinks his children are utterly perfect, this is not always helpful!

Banjax Sun 22-Oct-17 08:12:01

OP, I'd go to the GP. Worst thing, is they'll tell you to go back later, but at least your concerns will be documented which might come in handy later.

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