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5050 in my mind for ASD

(10 Posts)
eeniemeenieminiemoe2014 Sat 03-Jun-17 09:45:08

Dd has an assessment on monday for SALT as part of a wider process for ASD.

Half the time I think she is and then half the time I think she isnt but then I wrote all my concerns down and had three full sides of a4 when typed :/

she is 2.5 and here are my biggest worries:

*she never clapped, gestured, babbled, waved or pointed until 18 months. she never had seperation anxiety, she never cared if someone left or entered

* she had about 50 words this time last year and then lost all except maybe three and is now back up to about 30. in the last fortnight she has just started using two words together

* If baby brother or I are obviously crying she doesnt notice and if she hurts him or I she laughs

* she bolts, massively and comstantly its horrendous

* she head bangs, against walls during extreme meltdowns or she will pick a hard object up and hit her head with it. wven when she is calm of there is something behind her she bangs her head and if we are holding hands she will bang her head into my hand.

* constantly makes herself fall with no concept of safety

* absolutely no stranger awareness she bolted in a shop the other day and i caught up to her in a strangers arms wanting to go with her

* hates being restrained

* weird repetitive noise she makes

* licks and sucks anything remotely wet

* very aggressive

* sleep is horrendous

* her play seems very limited to what I have taught her. lines things up constantky and always has had an obsession with putting things in boxes and bags

* also obsessed with taking things off: clothes off her dolls, stickers on any surface, wont allow plasters on her skin, anything that can be taken apart is

however

she is incredibly friendly and cuddly, will cuddle anyone possible

her eye contact seems ok to me

she seems incredibly happy

she is incredibly intelligent, scarily so

wish there was a definitive answer

Polter Sat 03-Jun-17 10:17:41

she is incredibly friendly and cuddly, will cuddle anyone possible

her eye contact seems ok to me

she seems incredibly happy

she is incredibly intelligent, scarily so

Autistic people are and can be all those things smile

Hopefully the assessments will shed some light and help you find ways to help support her. Good luck flowers

eeniemeenieminiemoe2014 Sat 03-Jun-17 12:30:07

thats good, I just worry her life with be difficult sad

out of interest at 2.5 should she understand if i say to stop because shes hurting me? she loughs rough play but I can never get her to stop

Polter Sat 03-Jun-17 16:57:22

Rough play can be very exciting and stimulating, and of course she's focused on how it feels for her not you! If she's hurting I would re-direct hands, maybe have cushions and a blanket handy to direct any too rough stuff.

zzzzz Sat 03-Jun-17 17:08:02

She sounds lovely. Lots of what you describe is like my ds who has ASD. It's different not dreadful. Like planting a daffodil and getting an orchid.


Or perhaps a Triffid grin

eeniemeenieminiemoe2014 Sat 03-Jun-17 17:36:37

I'm very at ease with the strong likliehood she will be diagnosed as ASD, it doesn't change her and she is still incredible. I'm more fearful the diagnosis will put up more barriers than those it takes down.

She was just trying to rough play with her 8 month old brother by trying to jump on him.. luckily he thought it was hilarious but I think I'm going to have a stressful few years haha.

One of the things I'm finding hard to deal with is how I didn't notice sooner. It is so obvious now I have a brother just how much she didnt do as a baby and I feel a wally for not realising!

zzzzz Sat 03-Jun-17 17:42:46

I'm more fearful the diagnosis will put up more barriers than those it takes down.

In what way?

Justanothersingledoutnumber Sat 03-Jun-17 19:03:36

I'm more fearful the diagnosis will put up more barriers than those it takes down.

If your child is autistic she will be autistic with or without a diagnoses, wouldn't you rather have a doorway open to help you get supported for her?

eeniemeenieminiemoe2014 Sun 04-Jun-17 07:06:20

Im a bit rubbish at explaining it but I want it to be a part of her but not defined by it or have people stereotype her.

mummytime Sun 04-Jun-17 07:39:23

I think you need to work towards not caring so much what other people think, and it is really hard. But accept her for what she is.
In some ways getting a diagnosis at 2 1/2 will be great - as you won't try to or feel you have to try to force her to conform to societal norms, but accept her for who she is.

I'll explain, when my DD started school I had a lot of moments of thinking "why can't you be like the others" eg. on school walks, at parties. When we finally got her diagnosis it did mean I learnt to no longer force her as a square peg into round holes.
And actually now for my DD the future is pretty bright. Although I still have worries, and certain circumstances cause "difficulties".

I really wouldn't worry about the label - but use it to get you the advice and support you need.

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