Talk

Advanced search

Here some suggested organisations that offer expert advice on SN.

AS: is it social or medical?

(17 Posts)
Swiddle Tue 30-Oct-12 12:24:59

For the secondary school admissions, I'm applying for my Aspergers son under the "social and medical need" criteria (he doesn't have a statement). But I have to tick whether it is "social" or "medical"... which is it? The support that he will need will be social, but his diagnosis is by medical professionals.
Any ideas?
(NB this is not meant to open up a philosophical debate, I just need to know what box to tick!)

WilsonFrickett Tue 30-Oct-12 12:29:14

Oh that's made my head swirl a bit. It's a medical condition, but its impacts are social. Can you tick both? If only one I'd be tempted to tick medical as medical may be treated more 'seriously' iyswim? (I'm not trying to start a debate either, I just think they might link medical to DDA which may be of more help to you).

DameMarghoulFountain Tue 30-Oct-12 12:32:47

i would also tick both, it's a neurological (medical) condition that has social implications

if you chose either that gives the both LA and PCT/HA leverage to get out of support hmm

bochead Tue 30-Oct-12 12:42:30

personally for a form like that I'd put medical for the following reasons:-

1/ The "social" side requires specialist input that's TOTALLY different from the tlc pastoral stuff you'd need for a foster child, or one who has had a recent bereavement etc (social in this context).

2/Your child may need SALT/OT/autism outreach & specialist equipment to access the curriculum not "learning mentors", "support workers", "CP" SWers etc. ie the support often comes from the medical side if only in terms of explainations of a child's difficulties via the original diagnostic report.

3/ Environmental factors due to sensory issues are easier to explain to laymen (LA officers) in medical terms and may play a significant part in your choice of school (eg small class sizes, a place out of the hustle & bustle to retreat to at lunch, journey etc). The best school on paper often isn't the best school for our children simply due to their sensory issues. (ICT expertise can play a part here too).

4/Medical carries more weight in terms of getting across that you aren't just being a pfb with a shy child if you want your child to remain with their friends from primary.

In a different context to school admissions I'd say something completely different.

troutsprout Tue 30-Oct-12 12:57:21

I'd tick medical also.

ouryve Tue 30-Oct-12 16:10:18

Definitely medical. The cause is medical. The social aspects are only a small part of the whole and are symptoms of the medical - neurological - condition

ProcrastinatingPanda Tue 30-Oct-12 16:13:03

I agree with others, it's medical but causes social problems.

zzzzz Tue 30-Oct-12 16:49:12

Medical. No different than any medical dx that impacts interaction.

Swiddle Tue 30-Oct-12 17:30:55

Thanks so much for this - Mumsnetters to the rescue, with the big deadline for admissions being tomorrow!
For the record, they ask you tick social OR medical, with no option to tick both.

bochead Tue 30-Oct-12 21:44:18

medical - a couple of sessions with a random "learning mentor" won't sort it wink

swanthingafteranother Tue 30-Oct-12 21:48:58

I ticked "medical" for ASD child with no statement.
I also included evidence though. Copy of diagnosis of HFA, and his original neurodiagnostic assessment by a consultant. That is what our LA required. I put a covering letter to explain why our first choice was suitable.
HTH

swanthingafteranother Tue 30-Oct-12 21:49:50

sorry "neurodiagnostic" not sure where that word came from confused it was something like that anyway!!!!

Swiddle Wed 31-Oct-12 12:34:26

Neurodiagnostic? Why not! I like it smile

AttilaTheMeerkat Wed 31-Oct-12 12:45:57

Swiddle

Have you previously considered applying for a Statement?.

Swiddle Wed 31-Oct-12 12:49:48

I've been told that he wouldn't get a statement. DS has never needed classroom support but needs a lot of emotional support. I almost feel sick now that a chance at a statement could have been missed, cos of course if we had one we could have our pick of secondary schools, and we've had so much angst over where he could get into.

whatthewhatthebleep Wed 31-Oct-12 12:59:53

sounds good to me...neurodiagnostic ...grin

AttilaTheMeerkat Wed 31-Oct-12 13:48:12

Swiddle

re your comment:-
"I've "been told that he wouldn't get a statement".

Who by?. If I had £1 for everytime I have read similar on here I would be wealthy by now!!.

The above is standard flannel trotted out by naysayers. You'd be wise to ignore such people and apply now. TYou are your child's best - and only - advocate.

"DS has never needed classroom support but needs a lot of emotional support. I almost feel sick now that a chance at a statement could have been missed, cos of course if we had one we could have our pick of secondary schools, and we've had so much angst over where he could get into".

Statements are there to address social and communication needs also.
No, its not too late to apply even now. Honestly, I would make such an application and asap (it can take around 6 months upwards to get one of these things fully in motion).

Use IPSEA's website www.ipsea.org.uk re the letter

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now