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Here are some suggested organisations that offer expert advice on SN.

music therapy board/forum/book - any pointers?

(24 Posts)
lingle Tue 18-Sep-12 10:31:15

greetings ladies, hope you are all well,

Does anyone know of any literature, or any good forums like this one, about music and non-NT children? Or failing that, good resources on music therapy?

I have a particular interest in the way extreme musicality might hinder functional language comprehension, but I'm also interested in reading more widely as this term I'll be doing music work with two KS2 children with different issues (one behaviour, one struggling with literacy).

StarlightMcKenzie Tue 18-Sep-12 10:32:51

ooh. I know nothing - sorry, but am interested in the subject if you find out.

dev9aug Tue 18-Sep-12 11:02:54

and gents if I might add. smile thanks for asking.

I have no idea I am afraid.
We are starting music therapy with DS1(3) next week with the view that it might help his communication. we get wonderful eye contact with DS1 if we happen to be singing his favourite song and he has recently started copying some songs and even actions from the musical videos. so I am hoping that he will respond positively to music therapy.

I have a particular interest in the way extreme musicality might hinder functional language comprehension
I will ask the therapist and see what she can come up with and maybe recommend any boards/forums when I see her next week.

lingle Tue 18-Sep-12 13:11:20

and gents smile

StarlightMcKenzie Tue 18-Sep-12 14:39:20

ah dev, blame it on the patriarchy wot designed the autocorrect.....

StarlightMcKenzie Tue 18-Sep-12 14:40:07

or summat.

dev9aug Tue 18-Sep-12 15:26:55

"blame it on the patriarchy*
off course, tis Mumsnet after all..grin

dev9aug Tue 18-Sep-12 15:28:16

By the way,I have a question to ask you. We are using Hertfordshire music Therapy. Have you heard of them?

StarlightMcKenzie Tue 18-Sep-12 15:35:09

yep. very nice people iirc.

oliviaaah Wed 19-Sep-12 13:24:30

Have a look at Sounds of Intent. Don't know much about them, but worth a look I'd say. soundsofintent.org

JoMaman Wed 19-Sep-12 16:55:38

not exactly SN related but this book might be of interest?
daniellevitin.com/publicpage/books/this-is-your-brain-on-music/

www.bamt.org has a forum but I haven't been on it.

Music therapy was fab for ds1

porridgelover Wed 19-Sep-12 17:42:56

OP its not music therapy but Therapeutic Listening is based on the work of Paul Madaule.
He was influenced by Dr Tomatis a French Physician, the son of Opera singers (I think) who was interested in how musicality interacted with health.
Would that be along the line of what you are researching?

lingle Wed 19-Sep-12 19:05:21

thank you. sounds like I need to wheedle my way on to the bamt forum. wonder if it is public access.

tryingtokeepintune Wed 19-Sep-12 20:12:10

Nordoff Robbins, the national music charity dedicated to transforming the lives of vulnerable children and adults across the UK might be able to help as they also do research work. here

Also perhaps a music psychologist such as Dr Adam Ockelford, who worked with Derek Paravicini, the blind English autistic savant and musical prodigy, can help by pointing you to relevant research.

TheLightPassenger Wed 19-Sep-12 20:36:04

well I know little about music therapy, but I wonder if extreme musicality is part of a form of pattern recognition, where children with ASD or ASD type receptive language problem find the logic of patterns (jigsaws/numbers/letters/music) much easier than language/communication. I've always wonder if echolalia tied in with the way people can memorise a song in a foreign language, sing it seemingly convincing, but without understanding the words.

JoMaman Wed 19-Sep-12 21:40:07

hi again,
another thing I've remembered is I think this book www.amazon.co.uk/The-Einstein-Syndrome-Bright-Children/dp/0465081401 has a chapter on unusual musical gifts and SNs like ASD and visual impairment. I read it a while ago and remember I did not agree with some of the themes in the book, or i felt they didn't apply to ds1, but the part on music was very interesting.

lingle Wed 19-Sep-12 21:51:35

"well I know little about music therapy, but I wonder if extreme musicality is part of a form of pattern recognition, where children with ASD or ASD type receptive language problem find the logic of patterns (jigsaws/numbers/letters/music) much easier than language/communication. I've always wonder if echolalia tied in with the way people can memorise a song in a foreign language, sing it seemingly convincing, but without understanding the words. "

precisely!

mariamma Wed 19-Sep-12 23:36:27

the guru

lingle Thu 20-Sep-12 11:43:08

aha! I knew this person had to exist!!!!

thank you mariamma

<settles down happily>

mariamma Thu 20-Sep-12 21:30:07

grin I hear she's impressive in person as well as in writing. There seems to be a good team there as well

lingle Fri 21-Sep-12 13:12:51

thank you. do you have a background in this area yourelf?

I haven't found any of the papers to be freely available yet. But shall persevere.

mariamma Fri 21-Sep-12 19:25:54

Nope, I met one of her students!

ohmeohmy Fri 21-Sep-12 19:43:55

Google advanced brain technologies

lingle Sat 22-Sep-12 12:11:24

thanks mariamamma I think I will just have to dive straight in!

ohmeohmy, that looks interesting. It's a bit counterintuitive for me and my family. I am suggesting that extreme musicality can be part of the "extreme pattern recognition" problem for some children, that music is not always benign for all people at all times.

Perhaps the easiest example to give is that of perfect pitch. DS2 unfortunately has it, and it is a major barrier to communication with other musicians, who all have to adjust to the fact that Ds2 can hear something "wrong" in what they do when it sounds "right" to them and to other musicians.

Amyway, maybe I should try their brainbuilder programme and see how it works for me smile

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