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dribble

(15 Posts)
hazeyjane Tue 12-Jul-11 05:59:51

I have posted this in children's health as well

ds (1) dribbles, a lot! He gets through tons of bibs, and if he doesn't wear them his tshirt is soaked through in about 15 minutes.

He is under investigation for global developmental delay, and I think the dribble is more than the usual teething stuff.

He has started to get a blistery rash around his neck, can anyone recommend the best thing to clear it up/prevent it.

I have also become an obsessive bib buyer! Any suggestions on the best?
(absorbancy, comfort etc)

Thankyou

wentshopping Tue 12-Jul-11 06:51:28

Dd3 dribbles a lot - she has cerebral palsy, and one of her issues is that she has a pronounced tongue thrust which helps push out a load of drool. We live in the US and I use an adapted bib called a bendana, which is a bandana sewn in half with absorbent terry towelling inside. I have actually made a couple myself.. not as neat as the bought ones though.... they are generally meant for much older kiddos than yours, though. www.bendanas.com/
On the rash, our kiddy doctor said it was the drool reacting with the skin - aquaphor gel cleared it up very quickly. (Thinking whether you can get that in the UK...) It generally comes back in cold weather, almost like getting chapped lips.

hazeyjane Tue 12-Jul-11 21:50:08

Thankyou for replying.

The bandana bibs are certainly better and nicer looking than normal bibs, I like the idea of making my own, some of them are very expensive, and we need to change ds's quite frequently!

I will ask at the chemist about the aquaphor gel, and if it isn't available here, then maybe there is an equivalent.

I am not sure whats the main reason for dribbling with ds, but his tongue is always out, I wonder if that is relevant.

1980Sport Tue 12-Jul-11 22:13:33

Hi Hazey - my friend's DS (NT) is an unbelievable dribbler. She puts a cheap bib with a waterproof backing (the asda White ones) between his tshirt and vest then puts a dribble on one round his neck www.amazon.co.uk/dribble-ons-Baby-Products/s?ie=UTF8&rh=n%3A59624031%2Ck%3ADribble%20Ons&page=1

She also uses the gel/cream that breast feeding mums use for cracked nipples to dry out his wee rash - lansinhoh I think it is.

coff33pot Tue 12-Jul-11 23:22:17

When my children were young and they dribbled and got sore chins and sore in the creases of the neck I used to put Sudocrem on by night as healer and ran a light finger of vasolene in the creases by day and the tip of the chin just to kind of moisturise but water proof it a bit when the indrustrial dribbling took hold!

growlybear Wed 13-Jul-11 15:15:26

Hi there dd has same problem.We get bandana style bibs from fledglings who make them to the right size in great colours too.We also use sudocrem as a barrier.If it becomes too much of a problem there are patches they can wear behind there ears to help dry it up a bit.

hazeyjane Sun 17-Jul-11 13:08:11

Thankyou.

I've been trying the vaseline/sudocreme thing but if anything the rash is worse, I think the bibs are kind of chafing too!

I have just given the remainder of my tube of lansinoh to a friend wh is just about to have a baby.

It seemed a silly thing to go to the drs about, but it is starting to look pretty sore, so I'll take him next week.

shaz298 Sun 17-Jul-11 13:28:28

My lo used to dribble for Scotland. Still does but not so much. he's 6 now. There's a lady on ebay who makes the bandana bibs and much cheaper than anywhere else.

However my lo has hyoscine patches which helped to dry up his drool. he had half a patch behind his ear and we changed it every 3 days. Worked a treat for him. Maybe you could ask you GP about them. xx

saltyseadog Sun 17-Jul-11 13:53:44

Ask your paediatrician for hyoscine patches. They release a small amount of the drug across the skin (like nicotinell patches) and have been genius in stopping dd's excess dribbling. We only use half a patch at a time, so a very low dose, and have seen no side effects.

saltyseadog Sun 17-Jul-11 13:54:14

Oops x post with shaz.

hazeyjane Wed 20-Jul-11 11:25:55

thankyou.

I've just made an appointment to see the gp, as one of the rashes has started to look open and a bit weepy, poor ds.

used2bthin Wed 20-Jul-11 19:57:21

Hi I am another whose dd dribbles excessively-she is nearly five and it is better than it was. As a baby I used to just change her top rather than bibs aas she was sicky too and it didn't seem much difference to wash five bibs a day or five tops iyswim.

Now she gets a bit smelly round her mouth because of it so the paediatrician recently offered tablets for it but I turned them down as she said they can cause tiredness etc as a side effect, can anyone tell me whether the patches also cause side effects?

growlybear Wed 20-Jul-11 20:07:41

Hi used2bthin we used patches a while ago,they are not as bad as the tablets and you can adjust how much of the drug they are getting by covering up part of the patch-bit fiddly though.They can dry up secretions too much which makes oral hygeine and eating difficult but like i say you can adjust it.hth

used2bthin Wed 20-Jul-11 20:25:49

Thanks growleybear will ask the paed about it. She doesn't seem to notice it and tbh its only a problem in that she always smells musty from dribbling and I worry that kids at school will be mean. I have just realised that she would go mad if I stuck something to her as she hates anything like plasters etc. But will definately find out more as hadn't heard of patches.

itseasyifunohow Wed 20-Jul-11 20:58:28

Hyoscine patches.
Please be aware that these patches can have the side effects. Some children find that they can cause the pupils of their eyes to dilate [as if you are in a darkened room]. These enlarged pupils can then affect their vision. If the child already has visual problems these patches can affect their residual vision as the child's pupils do not react as quickly to changes in light levels and when these children are taken into bright light, such as sunshine, it can be very uncomfortable for them.

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