Talk

Advanced search

Here are some suggested organisations that offer expert advice on SN.

Q to all re dc who regressed after MMR + Q on mylien

(9 Posts)
PipinJo Sat 04-Jun-11 23:00:10

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

nightcat Sun 05-Jun-11 10:09:09

PJ, my ds had neuro symptoms consistent with thinning of myelin and I was also too scared to do vit A as that can be toxic. In the end I settled for 80% GAPS diet plus flax seeds plus addressing Zn/vit B deficiencies and I would say it has made a significance difference.
I briefly considered chelation/biomed but was put off by the required long-term drs supervision and needles so did GAPS instead.
Have you read the GAPS diet book?
Myelin can be destroyed in autoimmune process, which in my ds was linked to gluten.

PipinJo Sun 05-Jun-11 10:26:56

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

nightcat Sun 05-Jun-11 11:02:03

My ds was older when we started (12) and neurologically not well at all, but he has significantly improved. GAPS is not that hard, I don't do it all, but was fired up after seeing initial improvement.
Just do what you are comfortable with.
Malnourished suggests low aminoacids too, another thing that drs never bother to mention, try to remove carbs and up the protein, the book explains that too smile yes, same author.
My ds was px high doses of vits/minerals but I wasn't comfortable doing that so went along with foods. It all stared quite dramatic as I was in tears and told him that as there was nothing else we could do, we had to try diet and asked him to co-operate to see if it helps. He did and we went from there, now he is just as vigilant and v aware when he accidently eats eg. gluten and notices a setback - but setbacks are not as severe as he was back then, barely walking and talking.

PipinJo Sun 05-Jun-11 12:19:55

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

nightcat Sun 05-Jun-11 18:47:29

PJ, I haven't read Breaking the vicious cycle, was talking of GAPS by dr Natasha Campbell McBride. Both are worth reading, tho I'd say GAPS updates SCD to the next level. Also, any lecture by the author is worth hearing, youtube etc.
As for malnourished, aminoacids, I'd say foods, foods, foods, things like caseroles, soups etc - I used to liquidise meat in them to get him proteins (after a number of years when he had rejected any meat). I was a total idiot allowing him self-restrict to veg foods as aminoacids are better absorbed from animal protein and best to limit carbs as much as you can. Veggie is fine if you are an adult who maybe finished growing and built the body, but not so good for a young child, unless you want to live off supplements. It's hard to overdose on real nutritious foods.

PipinJo Sun 05-Jun-11 21:14:44

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

bochead Sun 05-Jun-11 21:27:47

Pipn - you want a bod who has the job title clinical dietician so they are properly qualified to advise. A nutritionist can be someone who has done the weight watchers course leader training - not what you are after methinks! Good luck!

nightcat Sun 05-Jun-11 22:32:37

PJ, I just shove the skinned meat plus loads of diff veg into a pot, add a bit of water & a tin of tomatoes and let it stew... but do look up recipes online.
Soups even easier, but I always use meat on the bone lots of veg too.
I also had worries about ammonia with my ds and you don't need much protein to start off with, the thing about soups/caseroles is that aminoacids from meat get dissolved into liquid and they are v easy to absorb/digest. Otoh veg-based proteins are harder to digest as plant cells are made with celulose humans generally are unable to break down so some of the goodness they have are locked in fibre.
You need to get crafty with foods, my ds didn't eat broccoli until I made it into cauli and broccoli soup. GAPS book has some recipes, but there are loads online too, eg Nigella, as long as you stay off wheat/gluten.
In the GAPS link above there are some ideas, I'd say do what you can handle first and don't feel overwhelmed, it's an ongoing process.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now