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1-2-1 at secondary school

(6 Posts)
TLSP Mon 06-Mar-17 21:28:47

Hello everyone,

Wonder if anyone can give me some advices on the transition from primary school to secondary school for children with ASD. My little man is autistic and attends a mainstream primary school with full time 1-2-1 TA because he has a statement. We will be looking to put in an application for secondary school this Autumn for Autumn 2018.

We are looking to apply for mainstream secondaries and wonder whether we can expect to have full time 1-2-1 for him there and during the school open evenings, what questions should we be asking especially if we can't have the 1-2-1.

Another major milestone for the little man and want to do the best I can for him. Thanks.

lougle Mon 06-Mar-17 21:31:33

Would you definitely want him to have 1:1? Would he benefit from opportunities to develop some independence?

Does he have a statement (or EHCP?) Does it specify 1:1? If so, he should get 1:1 at secondary too. You should ask to meet the SENCO and check re arrangements with TAs. At my school, the pupils who need 1:1 get 1:1, but not always with the same TA (for the pupils' benefit - to get them used to working with different people)

Oh, but please don't refer to him as your little man to secondary teachers grin

wannabestressfree Mon 06-Mar-17 21:51:44

Not at ours he wouldn't sorry, The lsa's are seconded to classes with children ear marked - could have five with ehcp in bottom set English.

Brokenbiscuit Mon 06-Mar-17 21:56:10

I don't have any personal experience but a little boy from dd's class at primary school still has 1:1 support at secondary. He also has asd. I saw his mum a while ago, and he seems to be thriving in the new environment. smile I imagine a lot depends on the school.

TLSP Tue 07-Mar-17 21:16:12

Many thanks to everyone for their advice. It looks like it depends on the school but at least I know that 1-2-1 is a possibility and I will definitely question the schools about this provision. I expect my dd would still need the 1-2-1 support in getting around between the various classrooms as well as the actual learning as he tends to zone out in his own world without help to bring him back to reality.

The SEN policies of the schools I looked at tend to focus on physically disabilities rather than mental disabilities.

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