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Teething affecting babie's sleep

(11 Posts)
WendyPan1992 Wed 22-Feb-17 17:42:04

My 11 months old baby boy keeps waking up crying during the night. He screams until someone goes to get him from his cot. I usually offer him some milk and as I try to put him back to bed, he starts crying again...Sometimes I leave him to cry and he goes back to sleep. Last night, for the first time ever, I had to let him sleep in our bed. He had gone to bed at 10pm, and this was 2 in the morning when we woke up crying. He usually has 1h nap in the morning and 2h afternoon. But, when he has terrible nights like this one, I let him sleep longer during the day to compensate. But then he ends up going to bed later than what he is meant to. I feel stuck and am pretty sure everything I am doing is wrong! He cries nearly every single night...first I though it was separation anxiety but now I dont know if its teething or a combo of both. I give him calpol when he seems more bothered with his teeth and teething gel but this seems to do nothing about his sleep!
My partner leaves home for work at 3.30am so I am the one who has to deal with it all. Sometimes I can hear him scream in my head even when he is not screaming...
He only slept one hour after lunch today, so had to give him a 3rd nap after tea (something i always avoid for fearing he will go to sleep later that hes supposed to!).
On top of this hes eating less than usual (hes generally a very good eater).

I am curious to know if everyone else had similar situations. And what did they do to overcome it.
Anyways I am so sorry but I need to vent about all of this!

FATEdestiny Thu 23-Feb-17 20:08:30

What do you normally do when he wakes up in the night?

Heirhelp Thu 23-Feb-17 20:13:34

Ibuprofen is better than calpol but you can give both. Anbesol liquid, from behind the counter to the chemist is the better than gel.

Heirhelp Thu 23-Feb-17 20:14:59

Is there a reason why you can't just bring him into bed with you when he wakes up?

WendyPan1992 Thu 23-Feb-17 21:30:14

When he wakes up I usually go to him and comfort him. I also offer him some milk has hes not drinking much before bed (i believe due to teething). After that i change his nappy and put him back to bed. I just lay him in his cot, say goodnight and leave. He sometimes doesnt cry but there are days where he screams and i just go back to get him. I then let him lay in our bed with us for a few min until i try again.
The reason i dont want him in our bed is because i dont want him to get used to it.
Last night i decided to not let him cry anymore. What i did was place him in his cot and pat his back to sleep. It took me like 10min! No cry at all and he seemed so calm. I feel that letting him cry is affecting the way he feels towards his room, making him more anxious about bed time. I do not want that at all! Patting to sleep seems to work and is a good compromise as i still dont pick him up, but comfort him with words and by stroking, but i am not just leaving him.

I have heard that ibuproben is better for teething so i am definatly getting some! I will also look into anbesol liquid!

Beansprout30 Fri 24-Feb-17 21:35:29

Does he drink his milk when you offer it to him?

WendyPan1992 Sun 26-Feb-17 22:15:59

Yes he does. Sometimes not all of it though. But i find that he drinks some even on the days that he has it before bed. I think the milk is kind of like a conforter for him.

He wakes up every single night screaming. This has been happening for a few months now. I honestly dont think it could be teething :s can they have it for that long? I am more inclined towards it being separation anxiety or night terrors...

Beansprout30 Mon 27-Feb-17 19:56:58

Bless him. I'm no expert, I'm a FTM and my dd is only 7 months, does he have a teddy/comforter with him at night? Perhaps that may help calm him when he wakes. Does he have a nightlight?

WendyPan1992 Mon 27-Feb-17 21:58:00

He does have a teddy and a night light plus his dummy. I have also recently put some lullabyes as background noise but honestly he still sometimes wake up screaming 🙁 I honestly dont know if its time to take him to the GP...this has been going on for so many months! But it doesnt not happen during his daytime naps, only at night time and always arround the same time.

Beansprout30 Mon 27-Feb-17 22:44:03

was also going to suggest some background noise. I'd be inclined to get him checked by doctor I think just to rule out anything pain related

FATEdestiny Mon 27-Feb-17 23:05:21

When he wakes up I usually go to him and comfort him. I also offer him some milk has hes not drinking much before bed (i believe due to teething). After that i change his nappy and put him back to bed. I just lay him in his cot, say goodnight and leave. He sometimes doesnt cry but there are days where he screams and i just go back to get him. I then let him lay in our bed with us for a few min until i try again.

I think this is just a reassurance issue. Not a medical or pain issue.

Firstly - assuming the milk you mention is a bottle or beaker, he doesn't need it. I would stop it completely. It's not good for baby's teeth to have anything other than water at night. It doesn't matter that he didn't have milk at bedtime anymore, older babies often drop this. I very much doubt he is hungry or thirsty.

Secondly - taking him out of his bedroom is not a good idea. Neither is changing his nappy, unless absolutely necessary.

I would do all the settling in the cot. And not leave. I think he's screaming because he wants your reassurance. Best way to deal with tat is to give It, as much as he needs. Then once be a feeling more secure that you'll always be there for him, as long as he needs, he'll then be better able with you weaning weaning off how mych reassurance he needs.

So when he wakes, I would go in to him, but avoid picking him up. Lay him back down and lean into the cot. Better still lie down next to the cot on a mattress, if there is space. Stay with him. Llits of caring, compassion, shushing, lieing him back down when he gets up, tickling, patting etc.

It will take a long time initially. So get comfy and set yourself some realistic expectations. But over time, he will gradually accept that he has to stay in h8s cot and lie down. And he will gradually increase his trust that you'll always give him reassurance when he needs it.

Once you get to those acceptances, then start gradually withdrawing the amount of reassurance you need to give. Until in the end you get to being able to resettle him amd leave without any fuss most of the time.

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