Talk

Advanced search

AIBU to think MN shouldn't be advertising such dangerous shite?

(74 Posts)

MNHQ have commented on this thread.

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 20:36:58

home dopplers are bad enough - they can provide false reassurance to women who aren't trained to identify an accurate FHR, never mind the panic they can cause when a HR can't be found.

but FHR APPS ?! I'm fucking horrified that mn would allow a FHR app to be advertised on their pages. I've literally managed to get a healthy FHR reading from my FOOT.

They are SO dangerous. I'm sure I'll get replies saying 'oh it's just a bit of fun, no one would think its medically accurate'. Some women WILL think it's accurate, and not seek further reassurance from their midwife or hospital triage number.

angry

Soubriquet Thu 13-Oct-16 20:38:54

Yanbu

They should never have been sold to the public. They can cause huge panic and anxiety when a heartbeat isn't located and false securities when they are

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 20:42:49

yep. home use dopplers are bad enough. apps are even worse. I downloaded one just to see how accurate they were and I got a very reassuring healthy fetal heart rate on my first attempt!

I'M NOT FUCKING PREGNANT

CurlsLDN Thu 13-Oct-16 20:42:51

Hi OP, when an advert has the blue arrow at the top like that that means it's placed there by google - so MN provide the space and google fill it with whatever their algorithm decides is appropriate for you.

So, I'm not defending the advert/product, but this is not mumsnets choice

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 20:44:08

ah I see curls I didn't realise that

Shallishanti Thu 13-Oct-16 20:48:50

may not be mumsnet's choice, but they have a duty of care

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 20:52:04

agreed shall

MoggyP Thu 13-Oct-16 20:52:48

No, I don't think they have a duty of care (other than to their employees).

But they can and do have certain ads excluded from Ad Choices (or whichever supplier it is) and this does look like one that should be expunged.

PeachBellini123 Thu 13-Oct-16 20:53:06

I don't think these should be sold full stop. Got to admit as a first time and anxious mum to be I was tempted to buy one: until a friend told me some women's babies have reduced movement, they use the doppler and hear the heartbeat so think everything's fine but in fact baby's in distress sad

I stay well cleae other than use by a midwife!

mum2Bomg Thu 13-Oct-16 20:55:16

I got one and it was great. I asked the midwife to explain the difference in my heartbeat and the babies and she was happy to. She still advised me to seek help if reduced movement/pain but personally I loved it.

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 21:00:36

mum I'm really surprised your midwife endorsed home use. That goes against her professional training

neonrainbow Thu 13-Oct-16 21:01:18

They're a legitimate product available on the market and of interest to pregnant women. I fail to see the problem. The one i bought came with prominent warnings about not relying on it for reassurance.

ItsAllGoingToBeFine Thu 13-Oct-16 21:03:48

So, I'm not defending the advert/product, but this is not mumsnets choice

Actually, I'm pretty sure they can and do reject certain adverts.

I think people might be getting confused between a Doppler and the phone app which the OP is referring to.

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 21:05:08

neon it's great that you read the 'don't rely on this' warning and heeded it but there are many women who would see that as a warning in the same vein of 'warning: contains nuts' on a pack of peanuts; a warning that's required by law to avoid lawsuits but in reality it doesn't matter if you listen to it

AgathaMystery Thu 13-Oct-16 21:11:02

I tell you what's great. When women use these apps or dopplers they have purchased themselves.

It's REALLY great when they use them in later pregnancy to reassure themselves when their baby's movements start to slow down.

It's even better when these women know that a fetal heart rate is significantly higher than a human heart rate - you know, so the women KNOW they are hearing the baby not their own heart.

It's awesome when they seek reassurance on FB about a change in movements: 'aw yeah babe, totally normal, your little one hasn't got so much room now, mine was the same'.

But my absolute favourite thing is when these women finally come into hospital because the baby really isn't moving much - it's more a rolling feel, not a kick or anything for a day or so - but it's okay they tell us, I've heard it on my app.

They are definitely hearing a raised heart rate. It's their own raised heart rate because they have an infection, because their baby died 2 days ago you see. sad

So no, these apps should not be advertised ever. Especially here on MN. And any midwife who advises women about them needs reporting to the NMC.

BoopTheSnoot Thu 13-Oct-16 21:15:46

My midwife, during both of my pregnancies, told me that home Doppler shouldn't be used for all the reasons mentioned above. I hadn't even asked about them, but she said they were discussing it with all newly pregnant women as it was becoming a problem. I think they're more trouble than they're worth personally, I'd rather have a professional listen in to my baby and be able to interpret any readings properly. Always best to trust your midwife or obstetrician over a bit of kit bought online.

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 21:16:51

fucking hell agatha that killed me. I agree that a midwife condoning app/home doppler use has some serious explain to do.

It's so SAD and avoidable

Crunchymum Thu 13-Oct-16 21:20:16

Peanuts are not nuts though? <misses point by a mile>

SanityAssassin Thu 13-Oct-16 21:21:04

I used a Doppler with both of mine and loved listening to them however this was mostly before movements would have been felt anyway - once I felt them there was really no need (except for a sneaky listen!)

If people are stupid enough to ignore lack of movement then unfortunately that's their lookout. You can't ban everything just because some people chose to rely on it before common sense - and besides some people find them reassuring whilst still monitoring movement.

The Doppler (or App) isn't dangerous it's the stupid uneducated future parents.

Floggingmolly Thu 13-Oct-16 21:23:16

What actual use is it if it explicitly warns you not to use it "for reassurance"? confused. Is it a toy??

PikachuSayBoo Thu 13-Oct-16 21:24:50

I'm a midwife. No way would I "explain" to a woman how to tell the difference between a FH and a woman's hb.

A fh can be low as 60bpm if there's problems. Conversely a woman's hb could be over 100.

Even if you're 100% happy it's fh you're hearing how do you know it's normal for your baby. It's too simplistic to say anything between 110 and 160 is ok. For an individual baby a fh of 150 could be a tachycardia hypoxic baseline. Or 120 could be a baseline bradycardia.

toastytoastbear Thu 13-Oct-16 21:25:22

*If people are stupid enough to ignore lack of movement then unfortunately that's their lookout.
The Doppler (or App) isn't dangerous it's the stupid uneducated future parents.*

Well good for you. You're educated. Many many women are not

SanityAssassin Thu 13-Oct-16 21:29:31

Well good for you. You're educated. Many many women are not

Well maybe they should consider making themselves so before they bring another life in to the world. Information is freely available - use it.

bibbitybobbityyhat Thu 13-Oct-16 21:30:08

"The one i bought came with prominent warnings about not relying on it for reassurance."

So what is it for then?

LRDtheFeministDragon Thu 13-Oct-16 21:31:38

If people are stupid enough to ignore lack of movement then unfortunately that's their lookout.

That's an awful thing to say.

I cannot see why you imagine that a less intelligent, less educated woman is more deserving of going through the heartbreak of discovering her child has died in the womb. Which is the logical conclusion of what you are saying.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now