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Can anyone translate this latin sentence, dd doesn't understand her homework!

(47 Posts)
rcit Fri 10-Nov-17 20:18:00

and neither do I!

Cassia et Claudia filiae feminarum sunt.

If you can say why that would help dd also!
Thanks for help smile

Annebronte Fri 10-Nov-17 20:19:58

Cassia and Claudia are the daughters of the woman.

moreshitandnofuckingredemption Fri 10-Nov-17 20:20:37

I think it's "Cassia and Claudia are the daughters of the women / women's daughters".
If I'm honest I'm not 100% convinced about the "feminarum" bit but it's the best I can do!

IrregularCommentary Fri 10-Nov-17 20:20:52

Cassia and Claudia are the woman's daughters.

itssquidstella Fri 10-Nov-17 20:21:28

Cassia and Claudia are the daughters of the women.

Filiae = nominative plural
Feminarum = genitive plural
Sunt = third person plural, present tense, verb "to be"

moreshitandnofuckingredemption Fri 10-Nov-17 20:21:46

It's definitely plural ie women not woman

Annebronte Fri 10-Nov-17 20:22:42

Sunt means are (it’s a plural form). Verbs go at the end of sentences in Latin. Feminarum is genitive (of) plural of femina (woman). Filiae is daughters.

pollyhampton Fri 10-Nov-17 20:22:43

Cassia and Claudia are the daughters of the women smile

Florene Fri 10-Nov-17 20:22:53

Disclaimer I don't know any Latin...

But to me it looks like it is 'Cassia and Claudia are female siblings'. No idea why. Just does.

pollyhampton Fri 10-Nov-17 20:23:00

Or what they all said

Annebronte Fri 10-Nov-17 20:23:19

Sorry, of the women, not woman!

IrregularCommentary Fri 10-Nov-17 20:23:42

Sunt is the "they" form of the verb, giving you "are"

Filiae is plural, so gives you daughters.

Feminarum I got as female, and presumably its case shows it's the possessive, though my memory doesn't stretch that far to be specific!

IrregularCommentary Fri 10-Nov-17 20:23:45

Sunt is the "they" form of the verb, giving you "are"

Filiae is plural, so gives you daughters.

Feminarum I got as female, and presumably its case shows it's the possessive, though my memory doesn't stretch that far to be specific!

moreshitandnofuckingredemption Fri 10-Nov-17 20:25:10

They are definitely not siblings smile

Andrewofgg Fri 10-Nov-17 20:26:41

Omnia scit rete matrum!

Crumbs1 Fri 10-Nov-17 20:27:09

Gosh Filiae is first declension feminine. Feminarum is plural genitive - women. Sunt - third person present tense active - are
Literally means daughters women are. So yes, C and C are the women’s daughters.

rcit Fri 10-Nov-17 20:29:15

Thank you everyone very much so it looks like Cassia and Claudia are the daughters of the women.

So dd now gets that that the genitive "of the women" bit
but why is "filiae" nominitive? Are Cassia and Claudia, their actual names not the nominative? But filiae also is nominitive confused

BastardTart Fri 10-Nov-17 20:32:34

Cassia and Claudia are the women's daughters.

If it helps I think feminarum is the plural of the genetive case (genetive is belonging to, like David's dog = the dog that belongs to David/the dog of David) . If it was singular it would be the daughters of the woman, but because it is plural it is daughters of the women but that sounds clunky in English so change it to the women's daughters)

SushiForBreakfast Fri 10-Nov-17 20:36:03

Yes it’s what’s called an appositive noun phrase:

Summary from a grammar website:

“An appositive is a noun, a noun phrase, or a noun clause which sits next to another noun to rename it or to describe it in another way. (The word appositive comes from the Latin for to put near.)”

For example:

“Don't leave your shoes there, or my dog, Ollie, will munch them.”

(In this example, the appositive is Ollie. It is in apposition (as it's called) to my dog.)

SushiForBreakfast Fri 10-Nov-17 20:36:54

You can have more than one noun (or something in the nominative case) in one Latin sentence

BastardTart Fri 10-Nov-17 20:38:26

Their names are nominative first declention ( mensa, mensa, mensam, etc)

BlaWearie Fri 10-Nov-17 20:39:27

'to be' takes the nominative in Latin & English.

treaclesoda Fri 10-Nov-17 20:40:14

This makes me want to appreciate my Latin classes more than I did at the time.

Why are things that bored me at school so much more interesting now?

qwerty1972 Fri 10-Nov-17 20:42:03

From what I remember (from a long time ago) when we are told what something is in Latin, the new noun takes the nominative and is called the complement.

Just looked it up 'The nominative is used rather than the accusative because the verb 'to be' is telling us more about the same person rather than describing something done to someone else.' (Latin to GCSE)

rcit Fri 10-Nov-17 20:43:24

OK, wonderful thank you so much
We get it now, with thanks to Ollie the dog grin

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