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Quick Kitchen Island Question

(30 Posts)
Neverspeakofthisagain Sun 21-Feb-21 10:58:44

We are renovating at the moment and the electrician is coming tomorrow to plan lighting in the kitchen extension. We are getting our kitchen from Handmade Kitchens of Christchurch (much recommended on here) but there lead time is loooooooooong - June. You don't actually talk to the planner until 10 weeks before, so I am not sure exactly how big our kitchen island will be.

I am trying to calculate where to put the pendant lights over the island and I know that the units on the back wall will be roughly 65 deep, and then I want a clearance of at least 1 metre before the island starts but I don't know how deep to allow whcih I need to do in order to centre light fittings? If I wanted drawers on both sides and a 'lip' for seating - what sort of width would that be?

If anyone has followed this gobbledegook and can give me a vague answer, I'd be very grateful!

OP’s posts: |
minipie Sun 21-Feb-21 11:22:42

How deep for your island you mean?

Kitchen units are 60cm deep (whether drawers or cupboard). For a breakfast bar with seating you need 30cm overhand minimum.

So generally the minimum depth for an island with breakfast bar is 90cm - one unit plus 30cm.

My island is 1.2m x 2.5m ish. One half has two full units back to back, the other has a 60cm unit back to back with a 30cm unit which leaves 30cm for a breakfast bar. (The 30cm unit is behind the breakfasts stools so not very accessible).

Hope that helps

minipie Sun 21-Feb-21 11:28:47

If you want accessible drawers on both sides and a breakfast bar then you either need to have the breakfast bar at one end, or have an island split in two like mine, where you have drawers both sides at one end but not the other.

Africa2go Sun 21-Feb-21 11:37:59

I'd be tempted to wait until your island is in before you get the lights fitted. If the pendants are not central it will ruin the look and drive you mad (or cost more for the electrician to come back and correct).

LittleOverwhelmed Sun 21-Feb-21 11:42:57

Africa2go

I'd be tempted to wait until your island is in before you get the lights fitted. If the pendants are not central it will ruin the look and drive you mad (or cost more for the electrician to come back and correct).

I am soon to have the same dilemma...

What do you do about the first fix though? Don’t you need to know where the cables are coming out of the ceiling?

Flamingolingo Sun 21-Feb-21 11:47:09

I’m pretty sure for ours the cable was left in the ceiling and the holes drilled and lights fitted with the island in place. There are electrical connections that happen when the kitchen is fitted so it wasn’t a big deal

Midlifephoenix Sun 21-Feb-21 11:55:54

Yes he can leave extra cable up there and then after kitchen has been designed put the actual light fittings in. You may change your mind over the next couple months so don't commit yourself now. However, if you do go ahead and it's wrong it is fixable, though you will be paying to get the job done twice.

Neverspeakofthisagain Sun 21-Feb-21 12:09:17

Thanks all. Yes it's first fix. How much flexibility do I have after that?

OP’s posts: |
NoParticularPattern Sun 21-Feb-21 12:09:34

Get your electrics put in but don’t have them bring them through the ceiling. Leave it all coiled up in the roof space/under the above floorboards. One thing to be aware of is that joists/beams etc in the ceiling/floor above will to some extent dictate where the lights go- they’ll have to come down somewhere in between them. So probably worth drawing on the ceiling a rough idea of where they can go so that you can make sure they will look “right” when you’ve worked out the exact placement and dimensions of the island. For example I wanted 2 lights over our kitchen table but the way the joists are above the kitchen has meant that it looked far nicer to have 3 because then they could be more central than having 2 which would have been offset to the rest of the lighting and look weird. If they leave it all ready to just drill/core out the holes to bring the wires down then it’s just a case of doing that, attaching lights and making sure it’s all coupled up to switches etc once you’re ready for them to go in.

minipie Sun 21-Feb-21 12:15:32

Yes if you get a cable run to roughly the right place during first fix then you do have flexibility to move it around a bit at second fix. Make sure they leave plenty of length on the cable.

The limiting factor will be your ceiling joists as once the ceiling plasterboard is up it’s a bit of a PITA to get a cable past a joist.

But moving it around in the space between the joists is fine.

LittleOverwhelmed Sun 21-Feb-21 12:26:47

Thanks very much to both the OP and the people answering the thread 😊👍

Neverspeakofthisagain Sun 21-Feb-21 17:21:30

Yes. This has been really useful thanks all.

OP’s posts: |
AdventureIsWaiting Sun 21-Feb-21 17:32:45

Something else to consider OP is light fitting vs. surface colour. Our worktop is very, very pale, almost white. We went for spotlights all around the 'walkway' area, but due to the room width they are over the worktop at the side of the room. Something we didn't realise at the time is that, with such a pale surface, if you're standing and working you can get blinded by the reflection of the light on the surface. If we'd had a pendant over the island worktop I think it would be very annoying to stand there cooking for any period of time.

Neverspeakofthisagain Sun 21-Feb-21 21:11:22

AdventureIsWaiting

Something else to consider OP is light fitting vs. surface colour. Our worktop is very, very pale, almost white. We went for spotlights all around the 'walkway' area, but due to the room width they are over the worktop at the side of the room. Something we didn't realise at the time is that, with such a pale surface, if you're standing and working you can get blinded by the reflection of the light on the surface. If we'd had a pendant over the island worktop I think it would be very annoying to stand there cooking for any period of time.

This is a good tip. Whatever we have will be on a dimmer, so hopefully this will negate some of the glare, but I'll certainly consider it - thanks!

OP’s posts: |
Qc16 Tue 23-Feb-21 09:47:02

I’m in almost the exact same position as you @Neverspeakofthisagain - kitchen ordered from HKOC but ours is coming in April. We have had plans drawn up as we had to delay two previous deliveries but now there has been a change in the architects drawing so the island will be moving.
I’m attaching our original plans but I want a couple of changes as part of that central wall is being removed so I want the island moved over closer to the cooker. In addition I’m moving the fridge over on to the long run between the larder top and the drawer unit to the right of the cooker.

Neverspeakofthisagain Tue 23-Feb-21 17:23:05

@Qc16 So are you having to move electrics? How is that working out? April - lucky you!

OP’s posts: |
Qc16 Tue 23-Feb-21 19:33:48

@Neverspeakofthisagain - we’re doing an extension so no electrics in as yet.

HasaDigaEebowai Tue 23-Feb-21 19:42:13

I am about to cancel my HMK order. I've heard a couple of horror stories lately and the DIY kitchens lead time (and pricing) is much better. Its well worth sacrificing the £350 deposit, particularly if you don't need unusual sized units.

Qc16 Tue 23-Feb-21 20:02:50

Hopefully DIY kitchens are going to be cheaper as they’re not in the same league - there’s a reason HKOC have a long lead time.

HasaDigaEebowai Tue 23-Feb-21 20:27:28

That’s why I initially went with them but my kitchen designer is not impressed and has had issues and and so advised against them. I’m torn but do trust the designer

Qc16 Tue 23-Feb-21 20:41:57

HKOC have their own designers. They did our design for us.
Does the designer not recommend any other bespoke in frame kitchens that are comparable.

Neverspeakofthisagain Tue 23-Feb-21 22:38:23

I did the virtual design meeting with DIY and got some sample doors sent. The chap was very nice and the kitchens looked ok on the screen. He helped with my layout and made some useful observations. But they do very few 'in frame' options, and the ones they do have beading that is moulded and a bit plastic looking. Door samples arrived and they just didn't compare with the quality of my friend's HKOC.

Fingers crossed I won't regret my choice.

OP’s posts: |
Qc16 Wed 24-Feb-21 09:18:27

@Neverspeakofthisagain - did you go to any showrooms - we had been to Neptune, Harvey Jones and Holloway’s kitchens before going to HKOC and quite frankly there was little or no difference in the quality- only the price! What you do get with this other companies is that they fit and paint the kitchens but they are more than double the cost and were out of our price range!
I’m sure we will both love our kitchens when they are fitted.

SollaSollew Wed 24-Feb-21 09:31:21

Hi @Neverspeakofthisagain I had a DIY kitchens kitchen in my last house (4 years ago) and a HMKOC kitchen this time. You're right in that you really can't compare them, the quality is just totally different hence the difference in price.

In terms of electrics, have you thought about sockets on your island. We have a couple on our peninsular and some on the inside as it's where I have the microwave and power from for the wine fridge. Hope this isn't too late!

Neverspeakofthisagain Wed 24-Feb-21 10:05:28

Yes. Sockets in island covered - thanks though!

I'm sure I'm going to be happy with my HKOC. My friend's is beautiful.

I think DIY is better than Wren/Benchmarx and deffo B&Q etc but I don't think you can compare with solid timber.

OP’s posts: |

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