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Timber framed first floor extension

(11 Posts)
Mallowmarshmallow Thu 21-Jan-21 20:14:03

Has anyone opted for a timber framed extension?

We're considering it as potentially a cheaper alternative to a brick built extension. It would be first floor on top of an existing single storey extension we built a few years ago.

OP’s posts: |
Dinosauraddict Thu 21-Jan-21 20:15:03

You'd need to consider difficulties with resell

CaurnieBred Thu 21-Jan-21 20:24:04

Timber ones seem to be more popular in Scotland: there were a few on my parents' estate. Was not even an option given by our builder in London.

Maybe try Scotsnet section if no joy here.

MyCatShopsAtAldi Thu 21-Jan-21 20:32:25

It’s classed as non-standard construction so you’d want to look into implications around mortgages, insurance and so on quite carefully. It was suggested to us that we do a single story extension with a timber frame but we decided against it for those reasons.

DevilDamo Thu 21-Jan-21 20:54:57

MyCatShopsAtAldi

It’s classed as non-standard construction so you’d want to look into implications around mortgages, insurance and so on quite carefully. It was suggested to us that we do a single story extension with a timber frame but we decided against it for those reasons.

Better let all those major house building developers know tomorrow hmm

MyCatShopsAtAldi Thu 21-Jan-21 21:23:28

@DevilDamo, very happy to stand corrected - that is what we were told by a structural engineer when our architectural technician at the time suggested that we build our extension using timber frame construction. It may be that we were wrongly advised, but I had concerns about building a timber framed extension onto a brick house. This is why I suggested OP look into it, rather than taking some random in the internet’s word as gospel.grin

DevilDamo Thu 21-Jan-21 21:34:05

There are many varying factors that would dictate a timber frame over traditional build. When people say timber frame, it also usually means the internal skin is timber and still retaining a brick or rendered block facade.

As mentioned, you’ll probably find the majority of the larger housing developments are timber frame so there wouldn’t be many issues with mortgages, insurances, etc... I’m also quite sure these houses that feature on DIYsos are insulated timber frame panels. Again, it wouldn’t be the adopted method if there were to be major financial implications.

Ylvamoon Thu 21-Jan-21 21:43:04

We had one built on top of our garage ( bathroom & bedroom) No issues, has all been singed off by structural engineer - to ensure foundations are safe. No issues with building regulations and planning either.
Your sticking point will be the suitability of the foundations from your single storey extension.
If it all has the correct paperwork, there should be no issues with mortgage or selling the home on.

Pugliandreamer Thu 21-Jan-21 21:45:27

Oakwrights would be a good company to speak too. Very high quality architects etc, great build quality. Not sure if they do second storey but always worth a phone call.

PresentingPercy Thu 21-Jan-21 23:18:23

Oakwrights are oak framed buildings and not remotely the same as timber framed. A totally different product and waaay more expensive.

Timber framed is now considered perfectly normal however many engineers will describe it as non standard because most houses are still bricks and mortar. So timber framed is different but still a perfectly valid form of construction and often quicker to build. Builders whack them up quickly so build costs are less.

You do need to ensure your foundations are suitable for another storey. You must consider how it will join to the existing building. Will the frame shrink and what would that mean for joints? You don’t want cracks. It won’t cause a problem for mortgages.

Pugliandreamer Fri 22-Jan-21 11:34:54

Ah apologies, I misunderstood.

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