Advertisement

loader

Talk

Advanced search

Cost of extensions - is it stupid to get ground floor only and then 1st floor at a later date?

(14 Posts)
Tinker Mon 10-Sep-07 13:30:09

I know it must be more cost-effective to do all together but what "needs" to be done is a little bone of contention between us. That and lack of any money...But ground floor really does need to be extended (well kitchen at least)

So, what's teh split in costs between ground and 1st floor - 66%/33%??

And if teh 1st floor was done later woudl this end up being a lot more than teh original 33%?

I know, how long is piece of string....

Kaloo20 Mon 10-Sep-07 13:31:59

As long as you ensure the foundations are deep enough to take a second floor at a later date I'm sure it would be a viable (but not very cost effective), way of extending. if you don't extend the upstairs it's a good selling point for the next buyers as well

NAB3 Mon 10-Sep-07 13:38:16

Double the amount of upheaval if you do it in two stages.

Notquitegrownup Mon 10-Sep-07 13:42:52

We went for ground floor only and kept the option open for doing first floor later. We couldn't afford both at the same time, but now the costs of doing the second floor are just silly. If you can possibly afford to do both, do it in one go. If you wait, you may find it cheaper to move house, rather than extend again.

Tinker Mon 10-Sep-07 18:10:11

All good points

McEdam Mon 10-Sep-07 18:12:50

I haven't actually built my extension yet, but we asked the architect who came round to advise us about this. He pointed out the 'two sets of disruption' argument but said we could have the ground floor extension built in such a way it would support a later first floor extension. As well as foundations, I think you need to consider whether the new roof (if you are having a flat roof) can bear the weight of a second storey).

We'll probably go ground floor only for now as we are skint!

HTH

McEdam Mon 10-Sep-07 18:14:10

But yes, it would be more expensive to do it twice than to get it over all in one go.

Architect also said if we do go for the later extension, we could do that in timber frame to save time/money/weight as opposed to brick and block on ground floor.

Tinker Mon 10-Sep-07 19:41:08

I don't think you can have a flat roof extension here so that's a point; would be paying for one roof only to remove it again. Nothing is ever simple is it?

LizP Wed 12-Sep-07 19:04:22

Also building regulations change. You may find the foundations you put in now may not be considered good enough in a few years time. We had to have part of our house rebuilt as it was no longer considered compliant and know my mum had the same problem - brought a house with a flat roof single extension and then discovered the building regs had changed and it was going to be way to much money and hassle to do the second floor bit.

Tinker Wed 12-Sep-07 19:13:14

Excellent point, thank you.

chipkid Wed 12-Sep-07 19:19:28

I am pretty confident that you will not feel like undergoing a second extension when you have lived through the first. Mine was relatively straightforward and we lived elsewhere-but the upheaval and stress involved in building works is not to be underestimated. I am now a year on and still the pain haunts me !!!!!

erm1ntrud3 Wed 12-Sep-07 20:17:09

Hi, we are thinking the same thing, we need to have an extension built but cant afford it at the moment. We have decided to wait 3 years to a. save some money and b. wait until house prices have gone up so we can remortgage and raise more money.

we are having the same discussion whether to go for groud floor followed by first floor later on, but the costs are SO different. for ground floor only is around £1000 per sq meter for 2 storey is £1500 per sq meter - so it is half the price in real terms.

we are in consultaion with our next door neighbours to bring down the cost as they want the same kind of extension as we do, so we can save some money but will have to work to a compromised work schedule is that something you could do? could you wait a few years? all things to consider - it's all so hard

Celia2 Thu 13-Sep-07 19:13:17

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Tinker Thu 13-Sep-07 19:15:35

I think a one-storey one is a no-goer then unless funds are really tight.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now