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Replacement Windows for 1930's Semi

(16 Posts)
OakCat Thu 12-Oct-17 12:58:44

Hi,

Help! We need to replace two massive original bay windows and rest of front of the house asap. I got a quote for standard upvc but just really not happy with the bulky look and also lack of character.

Was looking at aluminium and also flush casements but the local companies I've had round just seem to keep trying to sell be the bog standard upvc. Is going for aluminium going to be too £££? I just thought they might be stronger for the bays. Is it really worth getting aluminium when you only want white? Grey or black just wouldn't be in keeping with the property. Also anyone had any experience with the flush casements?

Thank you

guilty100 Thu 12-Oct-17 13:10:17

You can get aluminium in just about any colour you like! It doesn't just have to be grey - they can basically spray any RAL colour and you can have different inside and out if you want. Though there are quite a few 1930s semis in my area that have gone for grey and it looks fab.

You may need a specialist supplier/manufacturer but they aren't necessarily bank-breakingly expensive. (Some brands are, but there are others that are cheaper).

OakCat Thu 12-Oct-17 13:16:02

Thanks Guilty. Any idea on some of the better priced aluminium companies? Just seem to be so many online...

guilty100 Thu 12-Oct-17 14:41:33

I'm using Smart Systems, manufactured by a local company. I can't report back fully yet, as the windows haven't arrived, but I've been to the factory and they were extremely friendly, helpful and accommodating. There are loads of others, hopefully you'll get a good range of recs for quotes.

JoJoSM2 Thu 12-Oct-17 15:04:17

You could also consider uPVC that isn't of the ugliest , cheapest sort. There are some slimline options with different textured finishes. The best do look quite a lot like timber. You could also consider timber windows as they are great really characterful but they do tend to cost £££.

parkview094 Thu 12-Oct-17 15:11:41

We have Residence9 Flush Casement PVC Windows and our neighbour has the Evolution Flush Casement window. There is nothing to choose between them and they're a pretty good match for the original timber windows they replaced. Both are at the top end of the PVC price scale however.

Might be worth seeing if you can find a local supplier of these: www.liniar.co.uk/windows/flush-sash/

We did have a quote which worked out around £110 more (per window) than a regular non PVC window at the time.

hiddenmnetter Thu 12-Oct-17 15:46:17

Aluminium windows are awful cold bridges. I'd personally go with Upvc because you can bet less bulky than the standard and are less of a thermal bridge. Have a look around.

Also, the strength of the window support has nothing to do with what the window is made of, the wall above is supported by baypole jacks, the windows go around them.

IceCreamIceCream Thu 12-Oct-17 18:11:10

Things have moved on recently hidden, id properly check what’s out there now first.

guilty100 Thu 12-Oct-17 19:04:40

Yep - I know what you mean hidden because I had an old aluminium door that was just awful for letting the cold in. But take a look at the uvalues of the new tech! They are really, really warm these days.

hiddenmnetter Thu 12-Oct-17 19:12:27

Fair enough I haven't seen them in a while but it'll be interesting to see how they're making aluminium not conduct heat!

guilty100 Thu 12-Oct-17 19:15:13

Look up "thermally broken aluminium windows" on Google and you'll find loads of explanations/diagrams. They basically put a thick non-conductive layer between the two layers of aluminium.

IrritatedUser1960 Thu 12-Oct-17 19:20:30

I wanted Crittal windows for my 1930s semi but I'd have to win the lottery first, they are lush and now come in double glazed. I can dream.
I'd get the most expensive you can afford, the windows really are the stand out part of the house.

Tatlerer Thu 12-Oct-17 19:29:46

OP, I feel like someone should award me a masters in windows (renovating a house in a conservation area).
Firstly, are your existing bays definitely knackered? We had assumed we'd need to replace our existing timbers at the front, but upon closer inspection, the outer frames are as solid as a rock. We therefore had new double-glazed units fitted into the frames with slimline aluminium openers to replace the existing steel ones (also fully double glazed). Saved us a fortune.
We then required three new timber windows for a front-facing extension (rules of the conservation area); we had the openings measured by a local joinery company and ordered the windows online. Again, saved another fortune.
Finally, we purchased white woodgrain-effect UPVC flush casements from a local window company for the rear, older part of the house. These are called profile 22, similar to liniar that someone has linked to above. They're not fitted yet but we loved the look of them in the showroom.
Finally, the new contemporary-style extension to the rear is being glazed in anthracite aluminium (windows and bifolds). My advice would be to definitely shop around and research the heck out of it!

guilty100 Thu 12-Oct-17 19:31:36

I'm awarding you an MBA Tatlerer - Masters in Building & Alcohol wink

pericat Thu 12-Oct-17 19:36:37

We replaced windows in our 1920s house which are metal windows within a wooden frame using Met Therm Windows. http://www.metthermwindows.co.uk

They do replacements for crittall windows. We are delighted with our new windows and the cost was middling for an excellent job.

Tatlerer Thu 12-Oct-17 19:55:21

You got that right guilty!

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