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What choices we need to make after planning and before actual work starts for extension?

(17 Posts)
mum2015 Wed 14-Jun-17 10:45:22

Finally submitted our planning application for a two storey extension to council. Fingers crossed it would get approved without major changes.

I am at loss now on what to do next. Tell me what did you need to think about after planning application - boiler, where radiators will go, sockets, flooring type ??? Is it too early to think about kitchen and bathroom design?

beautifulspaces Wed 14-Jun-17 13:13:25

In most cases as an interior spatial designer I work with the architect/builder at the planning stage to ensure the interior spaces are well thought of in terms of sockets, switches, lighting, furniture layouts etc.
It is advisable to work out your spaces and furniture floor layouts from an early stage of the planning so that you know exactly where for e.g. there needs to be a plug point for that floor lamp. This forward planning can avoid costly mistakes/changes that your builder might slap you with if it is not stipulated in the proposed original agreement. Trust me they charge lots more on changes a client makes during the build process. It is wise to plan everything in detail from an early stage to avoid further costs, stress and quick snap decisions.

mum2015 Wed 14-Jun-17 14:43:18

Thanks beautiful spaces. I have worked out spaces and furniture floor layouts for all rooms and have a rough kitchen plan. I did this to make sure the new windows and doors are at right place and right height. Now looking at next stage of design.

I have started looking at pictures on houzz/pinterest etc but they seem to be too perfect and unachievable. My next idea is to look at houses on rightmove which are slightly over my house's price and nicely decorated. Atleast they look more realistic!

Are there any good websites/guides on lighting and radiator placement?

namechangedtoday15 Wed 14-Jun-17 20:34:32

Having just been through this process, its actually quite difficult until you see the space. Radiators and lighting are, up to a certain stage (before the room is plastered) relatively flexible. Things like placement of a sink / dishwasher etc (for instance if its going in a central island unit) needs to be decided - well for us as it was going in the extension part - before the concrete floor was laid.

The other thing which can affect decisions is of course budget. A fancy downdraft extractor (for hob in the middle of room) will cost more than a wall extractor. The bathroom in the same position as previously will cost less than moving things around. But I would say you need to have basic layouts to get builders' estimates and then see where / if you have to alter things.

beautifulspaces Thu 15-Jun-17 14:35:47

There are no longer guidelines as to where radiators must be placed. Traditionally radiators were placed under windows but with technological advancement the restrictions of placing them only on an exterior wall no longer applies. There are lovely designer radiators in all shapes and sizes and colours that can be placed anywhere in a room and can make a striking focal point. You could place them in alcoves etc. Having your layouts worked out, you could pretty much decide the best position for them.
The only thing to consider, is not behind any furniture unless it is a convector radiator which will emit heat from the top.
It is down to personal choice and of course to fit in with your scheme and room plan.
Lighting is a huge element of the design. Loads of factors to consider drawing up a lighting plan. Not sure if your architect could draw this up for you ....you may want to have a chat with them.
It depends on room size, function of room, room layout in terms of furniture and fixture layout, style, etc Each room will be different.
When designing the interiors of my clients houses, I consult with a lighting specialist as it is quite a big element of the overall design and look. Depending on who your builder is they may also be able to advise and draw up a lighting plan for you.
You could just google basic lighting plans. This will give you an idea of the different lighting you need to consider for each room.
Good luck with your planning

mum2015 Thu 15-Jun-17 15:51:08

Thanks namechangedtoday15 and beautifulspaces.

I dont have high budget and we need to go for basic fittings. All I can do is place everything like radiator, lights etc in best possible way so even the basic ones will do a good job. That is why I am looking for all suggestions and inputs.

Badweekjustgotworse Thu 15-Jun-17 15:51:29

Mum we're at this stage ourselves. Planning should be approved soon and our architect will then do the working drawings for us to put out to tender. I am literally torturing the poor man with endless queries. As ppp have aid it'll cost more to have to make changes once he price with your builder is agreed and they'll stick the arm in for anything that wasn't included in the original tender. Electrical layout, lighting plan , specify the windows and doors , don't let them just supply you as they'll mark up whatever they buy (they buy whatever is cheap and easy for them)

Toomanycats99 Thu 15-Jun-17 15:54:33

We did a loft conversion and placement of radiators, lights, light switches and plugs was fairly late in build process. Basically just before insulation and plaster boarding. Only consideration before that for us was how many were included in quote and how many we wanted.

wheresmyphone Thu 15-Jun-17 23:06:18

Do as much as you can and start now!!! It will take way longer than you think. Say you are looking at taps: there are a million different sorts, styles, makes. A thing that should be quick and simple will trigger loads of research and queries (see numerous posts on here for e.g.!). Once you start your builder will suddenly turn round and say have you got the radiators? need them
Tomorrow! what have you chosen? you do not want to making a decision in a rush. Do as much research as you can now. We have refurbed loads of houses and I still am shocked at how long it takes to decide.

OnePlanOnHouzz Fri 16-Jun-17 06:47:52

I agree with previous posts - use this time to research and plan as much as you can - also ask your builder for their timeline so you can preempt when they need certain things and diarise delivery of said items - if space is limited you may want to hire storage for these items - so they are available without being in the way - accidental damage can occur when things need to be constantly moved around a build site !
Most of all, try to enjoy the process !

ihatethecold Fri 16-Jun-17 07:02:41

This is a very useful thread.
We have just submitted planning for a kitchen extension, small barn conversation and garage conversation.
We have chosen our windows already.
Lighting baffles me. I get overwhelmed with choice.

Does anyone have any links to radiators.

I need 2 small ones right now for my Victorian living room.
Then more which are more modern for the extension.

mum2015 Fri 16-Jun-17 09:44:25

when you say choosing windows, do you mean just size and type like upvc double glazed white frame or have you actually chosen from where are you going to buy as well?

I sort of know the sizes now and we need to keep the windows similar looking to the existing windows of the house so not much choice in terms of style but haven't even thought about from where will we get it...

ihatethecold Fri 16-Jun-17 10:26:10

We went to a local company that has been recommended by the architect. we took our plans with us. they then quotes based on the style of frames we want.

They are not cheap but the building is south facing and gets alot of weather (sun, wind,rain) thrown at it.

We are using a company called Kloeber.

www.kloeber.co.uk

ShortLass Fri 16-Jun-17 16:53:38

As I am nearing the end of my refurbishment project, I would seriously suggest doing as much research as you can and making as many decisions as you can ahead of time.

This is because there will be a hundred things to do while the project is in process. You may suddenly realise, for example, that you need to order your flooring. If you'll already done the work ahead of time, then this will be a quick job. Otherwise you could be rushed into a decision which you should take more time over.

I know it sounds crazy but knowing what worktops or radiators you're likely to want ahead of time will save you time and stress later on.

mum2015 Fri 16-Jun-17 17:01:55

thank you. really good advice, specially for me who takes hours to choose just a duvet cover!

LWade Mon 19-Jun-17 10:48:41

I refurbish my rental properties in London all the time. Have you chosen your kitchen yet? If you are tight on budget you could try Howdens, they might also offer a free kitchen planning/design service, IKEA do this too and they are also a good price point and I have been happy in the past with both companies. Start as early as you can, work out if you want spot lights, wall lights etc and think about cabling, TV aerial points might be needed even in a bedroom, phone points, etc, etc. A good building company like the guys I use will help me with where radiators, sockets etc need to go and they also have window suppliers so they match the windows for me. My chap is called Clive (07966 476862) but they only work in London or the Home Counties.

LWade Mon 19-Jun-17 10:56:29

I refurbish my rental properties in London all the time. Have you chosen your kitchen yet? If you are tight on budget you could try Howdens, they might also offer a free kitchen planning/design service, IKEA do this too and they are also a good price point and I have been happy in the past with both companies. Start as early as you can, work out if you want spot lights, wall lights etc and think about cabling, TV aerial points might be needed even in a bedroom, phone points, etc, etc. A good building company like the guys I use will help me with where radiators, sockets etc need to go and they also have window suppliers so they match the windows for me. My chap is called Clive (07966 476862) but they only work in London or the Home Counties.

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